News Archive

Kaiser Health Tracking Poll: April 2014    Tuesday, April 29, 2014
The enrollment surge at the end of March in the health insurance exchanges, created by the Affordable Care Act (ACA), was widely covered in the news, as was the announcement that at least 8 million people have used the new marketplaces to sign up for coverage.  The news got a fair amount of attention from the public, with over half saying they followed the enrollment numbers “very” or “fairly closely.” But the latest Kaiser Health Tracking Poll finds that this news did little to change the public’s impressions of the law, with overall opinion remaining exactly where it was last month (46 percent unfavorable, 38 percent favorable). While over four in ten correctly identify the number of people who have signed up for insurance1, enrollment levels do not register as a success for most Americans. Nearly six in ten (including half of those who correctly identified the 8 million figure) believe enrollment fell short of the government’s expectations, and the same share believe the rollout problems indicate that the law is not working as planned. Still, more want the government to give the law a chance than want to scrap it and start over; nearly six in ten would prefer their representative in Congress work to improve the law, while just over a third want them to repeal and replace it. When asked why they haven’t gotten coverage yet this year, over a third of the uninsured say they tried to get coverage but it was too expensive, while smaller shares say they didn’t know about the ACA’s requirement to have insurance or didn’t think it applied to them. Just 7 percent of the uninsured say they would rather pay the fine than pay for coverage. This month’s tracking poll also finds public support for the ACA’s requirement that private health insurance plans cover the full cost of birth control, including a majority who believe that for-profit companies should be subject to this requirement even if their owners object to birth control on religious grounds. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted April 15-21, 2014 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,504 adults age 18 or older, including 754 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: Bipartisan Support for Increased U.S. Sanctions against Russia    Monday, April 28, 2014
As the Obama administration announces new economic measures against Russian officials and companies, the public supports increased U.S. economic and diplomatic sanctions by a 53% to 36% margin. But by roughly two-to-one (62% to 30%), Americans oppose sending arms and military supplies to the Ukrainian government.The new national survey by the Pew Research Center and USA TODAY finds that only about a third of Americans (31%) think that what happens between Russia and Ukraine is “very important” to the United States; 36% say events in the region are somewhat important to the U.S. while 29% say they are not too important or not at all important. The survey finds only modest partisan differences in opinions about U.S. policy toward the crisis in Ukraine. Comparable percentages of Republicans (55%) and Democrats (58%) favor increased sanctions against Russia and majorities in both parties oppose arming the Ukrainian government. There are much larger partisan differences in opinions about Barack Obama’s handling of the crisis. More than half of Republicans (55%) say Obama has not been tough enough in dealing with the situation in Ukraine, compared with 33% of independents and 23% of Democrats. These views have remained steady over the past month. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted April 23-27, 2014 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,501 adults age 18 or older, including 901 cell phone interviews.


Reason-Rupe April 2014 National Survey    Tuesday, April 08, 2014
Americans don’t paint a pretty picture of their public servants in the new national Reason-Rupe poll. Americans tell Reason-Rupe that 75 percent of all politicians are “corrupted” by campaign donations and lobbyists.  And they say 70 percent of politicians use their political power to help their friends and hurt their enemies. No wonder just 17 percent approve of the job Congress is doing.  Or that President Obama’s approval rating is just 43 percent, with 51 percent disapproving. And while the Supreme Court just struck down limits on campaign contributions to federal candidates, the new Reason-Rupe poll finds Americans are actually more concerned about how elected officials misuse their power and taxpayer money once they’re in office than they are worried about campaign contributions.  Asked, which is a “more serious” problem — “special interest groups spending private money on campaigns to elect the politicians they favor” or “elected officials enacting policies and spending taxpayer money that benefit the special interests they favor” — 63 percent of Americans said officials enacting policies and spending taxpayer money for special interests was a more serious problem. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted March 26-30, 2014 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,003 adults age 18 or older, including 503 cell phone interviews.

Kaiser Health Tracking Poll: March 2014    Friday, April 04, 2014
As the open enrollment period for new coverage options under the ACA comes to an end, the most-closely followed health policy news story this month was coverage of how many people have enrolled in these new options, with about half (48 percent) saying they followed this story “very closely” or “fairly closely.” Attention to this story trailed far behind the top two non-health news stories this month: the Malaysia Airlines flight that went missing over Southeast Asia (77 percent) and the conflict between Ukraine and Russia (68 percent), and just behind discussions in Washington about the federal budget and the veto of a bill in Arizona that would have given business owners the right to refuse service to gay people (51 percent each). Somewhat smaller shares report closely following other health-related news stories, including an upcoming change to food nutrition labels (46 percent), the announcement that some people who had their health plans canceled because of the ACA will be allowed to keep those plans for 2 more years (43 percent), a report finding a decline in the obesity rate for young children (40 percent), and news about a baby born with HIV who is apparently free of the virus after 9 months (33 percent). The least-closely followed health policy story asked about this month was news of the state of Arkansas’ alternative to Medicaid expansion, with only about one in ten (11 percent) saying they followed it “very closely” or “fairly closely.” Arkansas’ alternative to Medicaid expansion received national attention because it was the first state to win federal approval for a “private option”, which uses federal Medicaid money to help low-income people purchase private insurance, and because there was a contentious debate this month over continued funding. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted March 11-17, 2014 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,504 adults age 18 or older, including 751 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: America’s New Drug Policy Landscape    Wednesday, April 02, 2014
The public appears ready for a truce in the long-running war on drugs. A national survey by the Pew Research Center finds that 67% of Americans say that the government should focus more on providing treatment for those who use illegal drugs such as heroin and cocaine. Just 26% think the government’s focus should be on prosecuting users of such hard drugs. Support for a treatment-based approach to illegal drug use spans nearly all demographic groups. And while Republicans are less supportive of the treatment option than are Democrats or independents, about half of Republicans (51%) say the government should focus more on treatment than prosecution in dealing with illegal drug users. Support for Move Away from Set Drug TermsAs a growing number of states ease penalties for drug possession, the public expresses increasingly positive views of the move away from mandatory sentences for non-violent drug crimes. By nearly two-to-one (63% to 32%), more say it is a good thing than a bad thing that some states have moved away from mandatory sentences for non-violent drug offenders. In 2001, Americans were evenly divided over the move by some states to abandon mandatory drug terms. The survey by the Pew Research Center finds that support for the legalization of marijuana use continues to increase. And fully 75% of the public –including majorities of those who favor and oppose the legal use of marijuana – think that the sale and use of marijuana will eventually be legal nationwide. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted February 14-23, 2014 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,821 adults age 18 or older, including 1,340 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: Concerns about Russia Rise, But Just a Quarter Call Moscow an Adversary    Tuesday, March 25, 2014
In the wake of Russia’s annexation of Ukraine’s Crimea region, public concern about Russia has increased, according to a new Pew Research Center survey. Even so, when given the choice, more describe Russia as a serious problem but not an adversary (43%) than say it represents an adversary (26%). Just 22% say Russia is not much of a problem. Since last November, the percentage viewing Russia as an adversary has risen eight points (from 18%) while the share saying it is a serious problem has increased seven points (from 36%). The number of Americans who do not think of Russia as much of a problem has fallen by almost half – from 40% then to 22% today. Public Still Reluctant to See U.S. Get Too Involved in UkraineMost of the increase in the view that Russia is an adversary has come among Republicans. Currently, 42% of Republicans describe Russia as an adversary, up from 24% four months ago. Just 23% of independents and 19% of Democrats view Russia as an adversary, little changed from November. But increasing numbers of Democrats and independents describe Russia as at least a serious problem. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted March 20-23, 2014 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,002 adults age 18 or older, including 501 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: Nearly Half of Public Says ‘Right Amount’ of Malaysian Jet Coverage    Monday, March 24, 2014
The public followed news about the missing Malaysia Airlines plane more closely than any other story last week. While the story has attracted extensive news coverage, especially from cable TV outlets, most Americans do not feel there has been too much coverage of the missing jetliner. The latest national survey by the Pew Research Center finds that 44% followed news about the missing Malaysian jetliner most closely, far surpassing interest in any other story. Russia’s annexation of Crimea was a distant second, with 15% following that news most closely. Nearly half of Americans (48%) say news organizations are giving the right amount of coverage to the investigation into the missing jetliner; another 12% say there has been too little coverage of this story. A third (33%) think the investigation into plane’s fate has received too much coverage. However, more people think that the missing jetliner has received too much news coverage than say that about two other stories last week – Russia’s actions in Crimea and the rollout of the 2010 health care law; just 14% each view those stories as over-covered. For the most part, the public sees the amount of coverage of Russia and Crimea as appropriate (56% right amount). But fewer (40%) say that news about the rollout of the health care law has gotten the right amount of coverage. Nearly four-in-ten (37%) say implementation of the health care law has been under-covered by news organizations – the highest percentage of the three stories asked about. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted March 20-23, 2014 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,002 adults age 18 or older, including 501 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: Most Say U.S. Should ‘Not Get Too Involved’ in Ukraine Situation    Tuesday, March 11, 2014
As Russian troops remain in Ukraine’s Crimea region and Crimea’s Parliament has set up a secession vote, Americans prefer the U.S. to not get too involved in the situation. By a roughly two-to-one margin (56% vs. 29%), the public says it is more important for the U.S. to not get involved in the situation with Russia and Ukraine than to take a firm stand against Russian actions. The new national survey by the Pew Research Center, conducted March 6-9, 2014 among 1,003 adults, find more disapprove (44%) than approve (30%) of the way the Obama administration is handling the situation involving Russia and Ukraine, while roughly a quarter (26%) offer no opinion. Opinions about the administration’s handling of the situation are divided along partisan lines. A majority of Republicans (67%) disapprove of its handling of the situation, while most Democrats (56%) approve. Independents by roughly two-to-one (52% to 24%) disapprove of how the administration has handled the situation involving Russia and Ukraine. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted March 6-9, 2014 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,003 adults age 18 or older, including 502 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: Millennials in Adulthood    Monday, March 10, 2014
The Millennial generation is forging a distinctive path into adulthood. Now ranging in age from 18 to 33, they are relatively unattached to organized politics and religion, linked by social media, burdened by debt, distrustful of people, in no rush to marry— and optimistic about the future. They are also America’s most racially diverse generation. In all of these dimensions, they are different from today’s older generations. And in many, they are also different from older adults back when they were the age Millennials are now. Pew Research Center surveys show that half of Millennials (50%) now describe themselves as political independents and about three-in-ten (29%) say they are not affiliated with any religion. These are at or near the highest levels of political and religious disaffiliation recorded for any generation in the quarter-century that the Pew Research Center has been polling on these topics. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted February 14-23, 2014 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,821 adults age 18 or older, including 1,340 cell phone interviews.

Three-quarters of American adults support hydropower    Wednesday, March 05, 2014
Americans view hydropower as a clean, reliable and renewable resource, and support hydro-specific initiatives for tax credits, federal reinvestment in facility upgrades, and federal  investment in research and development. “Hydropower is already the nation’s largest source of low-cost renewable electricity,” said Linda Church Ciocci, Executive Director of the National Hydropower Association. “These poll results demonstrate that Americans believe that this invaluable clean resource should be maintained, expanded, and supported through targeted federal policy.” Hydropower enjoys a strongly positive reputation as an energy source. Nearly four-in-five Americans (78%) believe hydropower is cleaner than other current forms of energy, and roughly the same number (77%) think of hydropower as an environmentally-friendly resource. Moreover, hydropower is also seen as renewable (74%) and reliable (72%) by nearly three-quarters of Americans. With all of these attributes there is broad bipartisan consensus that they describe hydropower well – with majorities of Democrats, Republicans and Independents in agreement. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted January 9-12, 2014 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,006 adults age 18 or older, including 504 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: Hillary Clinton’s Strengths: Record at State, Toughness, Honesty    Tuesday, March 04, 2014
If she runs for president in 2016, Hillary Clinton would bring a number of potential strengths to the race, from her tenure as secretary of state to her perceived toughness and honesty. Fully 67% of Americans approve of the job she did as secretary of state, while majorities say she is tough (69%) and honest (56%). The public also rejects the notion that Clinton is unlikable – a change from the 2008 Democratic primary campaign. In a memorable moment from that contest, then-candidate Barack Obama turned to Clinton during a debate and said sarcastically, “You’re likable enough, Hillary.” Today, just 36% say Clinton is “hard to like”; a majority (57%) says that phrase does not describe her. During the 2008 primary season, about half of voters found Clinton hard to like (51% in March 2008). However, the new national survey by the Pew Research Center and USA TODAY, conducted Feb. 27-Mar. 2 among 1,002 adults, finds that Clinton is not widely seen as having new ideas. About half (49%) say the phrase “having new ideas” describes Clinton, while 40% say it does not; 11% offer no opinion. And while Clinton’s performance at the State Department is viewed positively, her handling of the 2012 attack on the U.S. consulate at Benghazi, Libya registers as a negative aspect of her background. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted February 14-23, 2014 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,821 adults age 18 or older, including 1,340 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: Public Divided Over Increased Deportation of Unauthorized Immigrants    Thursday, February 27, 2014
Immigration legislation is stalled in the House, but the public continues to broadly support a path to legalization for undocumented immigrants. At the same time, however, Americans are evenly divided over the growing number of undocumented immigrants who have been deported from the U.S. in recent years, with as many viewing this as a good thing as a bad thing (45% each). The total number of deportations reached a record number of 419,384 in fiscal year 2012, according to the Department of Homeland Security. With roughly three years left in Barack Obama’s second term, more than 1.6 million undocumented immigrants have been deported since he took office. In former President Bush’s eight years in office, two million were deported. While opinion about the growing number of deportations is divided along partisan lines – with Republicans more supportive of the practice than Democrats – Chart showing number of deportations of illegal immigrants per yearthere also are sizable differences between Hispanics and whites. By 60% to 35%, most Hispanics view the increased number of deportations negatively, while whites are more likely to see this trend as a good thing (49%) rather than bad (42%). The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted February 14-23, 2014 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,821 adults age 18 or older, including 1,340 cell phone interviews.

Kaiser Health Tracking Poll: February 2014    Wednesday, February 26, 2014
Amid the recent media focus on “narrow network” health insurance plans, the latest Kaiser Health Tracking Poll finds that those who are most likely to be customers in the Affordable Care Act (ACA)’s new insurance exchanges (the uninsured and those who purchase their own coverage) are more likely to prefer less costly plans with narrow networks over more expensive plans with broader networks. Narrow network plans are a tougher sell among those with employer coverage, who tend to pay less of their health care costs directly since their employers pick up much of the cost. Overall opinion of the ACA remains about the same as it has been since November, with just under half the public viewing the law unfavorably (47 percent this month, 50 percent in January) and just over a third having a favorable view (35 percent this month, 34 percent in January). Still, more Americans want Congress to keep the law in place and work to improve it rather than repeal it. Among those who are currently uninsured, unfavorable views of the law continue to outnumber favorable ones by a large margin as they did in January. Lack of awareness about key aspects of the law also continues among the uninsured – just about a quarter are aware of the March 31st deadline to sign up for coverage, and just over six in ten say they know little or nothing about the ACA’s health insurance exchanges. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted February 11-17, 2014 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,501 adults age 18 or older, including 751 cell phone interviews.

February 2014 Bankrate Financial Security Index charts    Tuesday, February 25, 2014
Bankrate's monthly survey measures how secure Americans feel about their personal finances compared with 12 months ago.  This month, the index fell to 99.3, the same level seen in November. Workers with full-time jobs were more likely to report higher levels of credit card debt. Thirty-six percent of full-time workers said they had a greater amount of credit card debt, compared with 24 percent for part-time workers and 21 percent for people who were not employed. Retirees were more likely to report higher levels of savings. Sixty-four percent of retired respondents said their emergency funds or savings accounts were greater than their credit card debt. That compares with 51 percent for those who weren't retired. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted February 6-9, 2014 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,004 adults age 18 or older, including 502 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: Mixed Views of Economic News Persist    Tuesday, February 11, 2014
Over the past year, the unemployment rate has fallen, but so too has the share of Americans in the labor force. The stock market rose during much of 2013, before falling at the start of this year. Through it all, the public’s perceptions of economic news have changed very little. Currently, 61% say the news they are hearing about the economy is a mix of good and bad, 33% say it is mostly bad and just 5% say it is mostly good. The public appears to view economic indicators – both good and bad – with a measure of caution. For example, 21% say they are hearing mostly bad news about the stock market while 13% say it is mostly good; 49% say it is mixed. Last June, opinions were more positive – 24% said the stock market news was mostly good while 16% said it was mostly bad. Yet half said the stock market news was mixed, virtually the same as today. The new national survey by the Pew Research Center finds that views about news on other economic sectors are mostly unchanged since December. More are hearing good news about real estate values (25%) than bad news (19%); while it is the only economic sector registering more good news than bad news, a 44% plurality still says it is hearing mixed news. Regarding the job situation, more of the public is hearing mostly bad news (42%) than mostly good news (12%). The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted February 6-9, 2014 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,004 adults age 18 or older, including 502 cell phone interviews.

The Rising Cost of Not Going to College    Tuesday, February 11, 2014
For those who question the value of college in this era of soaring student debt and high unemployment, the attitudes and experiences of today’s young adults—members of the so-called Millennial generation—provide a compelling answer. On virtually every measure of economic well-being and career attainment—from personal earnings to job satisfaction to the share employed full time—young college graduates are outperforming their peers with less education. And when today’s young adults are compared with previous generations, the disparity in economic outcomes between college graduates and those with a high school diploma or less formal schooling has never been greater in the modern era. These assessments are based on findings from a new nationally representative Pew Research Center survey of 2,002 adults supplemented by a Pew Research analysis of economic data from the U.S. Census Bureau. The economic analysis finds that Millennial college graduates ages 25 to 32 who are working full time earn more annually—about $17,500 more—than employed young adults holding only a high school diploma. The pay gap was significantly smaller in previous generations. College-educated Millennials also are more likely to be employed full time than their less-educated counterparts (89% vs. 82%) and significantly less likely to be unemployed (3.8% vs. 12.2%). Education and Views About Work Turning to attitudes toward work, employed Millennial college graduates are more likely than their peers with a high school diploma or less education to say their job is a career or a steppingstone to a career (86% vs. 57%). In contrast, Millennials with a high school diploma or less are about three times as likely as college graduates to say their work is “just a job to get [them] by” (42% vs. 14%). The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted October 7-27, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 2,002 adults age 18 or older, including 1,523 cell phone interviews.

EKINS: Polling the real-world effect of a minimum-wage hike    Saturday, February 08, 2014
President Obama wants to “give America a raise.” He’s raising the minimum wage for federal contractors to $10.10 an hour and is urging Congress to raise the federal minimum wage from $7.25 to $10.10. Politico also reports, “the Obama administration wants to make raising the federal minimum wage a centerpiece of Democrats’ 2014 midterm election efforts.” They hope the national push and planned ballot initiatives in several states will mobilize key Democratic-leaning constituencies that might not normally turn out in non-presidential elections. Advocates for raising the minimum wage believe this is a slam-dunk issue for them. First, they are equipped with numerous polls finding what appears to be overwhelming support. For example, Gallup recently found 76 percent favor raising the minimum wage, while only 22 percent oppose it. A recent Reason-Rupe poll found 72 percent of Americans in favor of increasing the minimum wage to $10.10 per hour, including 53 percent of Republicans, 72 percent of independents, and 87 percent of Democrats. The Reason results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted December 4-8, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,011 adults age 18 or older, including 506 cell phone interviews.


Pew Poll: Public Skeptical of Decision to Hold Olympic Games in Russia    Tuesday, February 04, 2014
With the 2014 Winter Olympics approaching, more say it was a bad decision (44%) than a good decision (32%) to hold the games in Russia. About one-in-four (24%) say they don’t know. Concerns about terrorism and safety are foremost among those who think it was a bad decision to hold the Olympics in Russia. In an open-ended question, 62% of those who say it was a bad decision to hold the Winter Olympics in Russia mention terrorism or general security in Sochi as a reason they feel this way. Most Plan to Watch At Least Some of the Sochi OlympicsFar fewer (5%) mention the Russian government or President Vladimir Putin as reasons why it was a bad decision to hold the games there, while 4% say Russia’s treatment of gays and lesbians make the country a bad choice to host the games. Most adults are planning to watch either “a lot” (18%) or some (37%) of the Olympics, according to the new national survey by the Pew Research Center. About one-in-four adults (26%) say they plan to watch “very little” and 19% say they will not watch at all. Nearly one-in-four of those 50 and older (23%) plan to watch a lot, compared with 14% of those younger than 50. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted January 30 - February 2, 2014 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,003 adults age 18 or older, including 502 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: More Now See Failure than Success in Iraq, Afghanistan    Thursday, January 30, 2014
After more than a decade of war in Iraq and Afghanistan, the public does not think the United States has achieved its goals in either country. About half of Americans (52%) say the U.S. has mostly failed to achieve its goals in Afghanistan while 38% say it has mostly succeeded. Opinions about the U.S. war in Iraq are virtually the same: 52% say the United States has mostly failed in reaching its goals there, while 37% say it has mostly succeeded. In both cases, evaluations of the wars have turned more negative in recent years. In November 2011, as the U.S. was completing its military withdrawal from Iraq, a majority (56%) thought the U.S. had achieved its goals there. Similarly, the public’s critical assessment of U.S. achievements in Afghanistan stands in contrast to opinion in June 2011, shortly after Osama bin Laden was killed in neighboring Pakistan. At that time, 58% answered a forward-looking question by saying they thought the U.S. would achieve its goals in that country; the question in the current survey asks whether the U.S. has achieved its goals. The national survey finds more positive views of the original decision to take military action in Afghanistan than about whether the U.S. has achieved its goals. About half (51%) say the decision to use military force was the right one while 41% say it was the wrong decision. However, the share saying the war was the right decision has fallen five points since November (from 56%) and 13 points since January 2009 (64%), shortly before Barack Obama took office. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted January 15-19, 2014 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,504 adults age 18 or older, including 902 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: Deficit Reduction Declines as Policy Priority    Tuesday, January 28, 2014
For the first time since Barack Obama took office in 2009, deficit reduction has slipped as a policy priority among the public. Overall, 63% say reducing the budget deficit should be a top priority for Congress and the president this year, down from 72% a year ago. Most of the decline has come among Democrats: Only about half of Democrats – 49% – view deficit reduction as a top priority, down 18 points since last January. The Pew Research Center’s annual survey of policy priorities, conducted Jan. 15-19 among 1,504 adults, finds that the public’s agenda continues to be dominated by the economy (80% top priority), jobs (74%) and terrorism (73%). As in past years, the lowest-rated priorities are dealing with global warming (29%) and dealing with global trade (28%). (Click here for an interactive showing the public’s priorities since 2002.) Deficit reduction had surged as a policy priority during Obama’s first term: Between 2009 and 2013, the share citing the deficit as a top priority rose 19 points. In the current survey, majorities of Republicans (80%) and independents (66%) continue to say reducing the budget deficit should be a top priority for the president and Congress. However, just 49% of Democrats view this as a top priority, the lowest percentage since Obama took office. A year ago, 67% of Democrats rated cutting the deficit as a top policy goal. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted January 15-19, 2014 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,504 adults age 18 or older, including 902 cell phone interviews.

January 2014 Financial Security Index charts    Thursday, January 23, 2014
Bankrate's monthly survey measures how secure Americans feel about their personal finances compared with 12 months ago. The results of Bankrate's Financial Security Index have a margin of error of plus or minus 3.5 percentage points. This month, the index rose to 102.6, up 2.2 points from December. Younger people were more likely to splurge: 18 percent of people between 18 and 29 spent more than expected, compared with 9 percent of those 65 years old and older. Big earners had trouble keeping to their holiday budget: 23 percent of those with at least a $75,000 income spent more than expected. That's compared with only 11 percent of those who made $30,000 or less. Those with less education were more likely to be frugal: 30 percent of people with a high school diploma or less spent less than expected. Nineteen percent of those with a college degree spent less than expected. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted January 2-5, 2014 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,005 adults age 18 or older, including 505 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: Most See Inequality Growing, but Partisans Differ over Solutions    Thursday, January 23, 2014
There is broad public agreement that economic inequality has grown over the past decade. But as President Obama prepares for Tuesday’s State of the Union, where he is expected to unveil proposals for dealing with inequality and poverty, there are wide partisan differences over how much the government should – and can – do to address these issues. Partisans Agree Inequality Has Grown, But Differ Sharply over Gov’t ActionThe new national survey by the Pew Research Center and USA TODAY, conducted Jan. 15-19 among 1,504 adults, finds that 65% believe the gap between the rich and everyone else has increased in the last 10 years. This view is shared by majorities across nearly all groups in the public, including 68% of Democrats and 61% of Republicans. Yet there is a sharp disagreement over whether this gap needs government attention. Among Democrats, 90% say the government should do “a lot” or “some” to reduce the gap between the rich and everyone else, including 62% who say it should do a lot. But only half as many Republicans (45%) think the government should do something about this gap, with just 23% saying it should do a lot. Instead, nearly half of Republicans say the government should do “not much” (15%) or “nothing at all” (33%) about the wealth divide. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted January 15-19, 2014 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,504 adults age 18 or older, including 902 cell phone interviews.

E-Reading Rises as Device Ownership Jumps    Thursday, January 16, 2014
The proportion of Americans who read e-books is growing, but few have completely replaced print books for electronic versions. The percentage of adults who read an e-book in the past year has risen to 28%, up from 23% at the end of 2012. At the same time, about seven in ten Americans reported reading a book in print, up four percentage points after a slight dip in 2012, and 14% of adults listened to an audiobook. Though e-books are rising in popularity, print remains the foundation of Americans’ reading habits. Most people who read e-books also read print books, and just 4% of readers are “e-book only.” Audiobook listeners have the most diverse reading habits overall, while fewer print readers consume books in other formats. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted January 2-5, 2014 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,005 adults age 18 or older, including 505 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: Christie Story Attracts Little Public Interest    Tuesday, January 14, 2014
The public paid far more attention to last week’s cold snap than to the controversy swirling around New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie. There also has been little short-term change in opinions about Christie: 60% say their opinion of Christie has not changed in recent days, while 16% now view him less favorably and 6% more favorably. The national survey by the Pew Research Center finds that just 18% paid very close attention to Christie’s apology on Jan. 9 for the highway lane closures ordered by his aides. By contrast, 44% very closely followed news about the cold winter weather that gripped much of the U.S. and 28% tracked news about the economy. The release of a book by former Defense Secretary Robert Gates that criticized the Obama administration drew even less interest than news about Christie. Just 11% followed news about Gates’ book very closely. Winter Weather Leads News InterestThe survey finds that majorities of Republicans (69%), Democrats (55%) and independents (60%) say that their opinion of Christie has not changed lately. Among Republicans, about as many say their opinion has become more favorable (9%) as less favorable (10%). More Democrats say their opinion has become less favorable (25%) than more favorable (3%). Among independents, 14% say their opinion of Christie has become less favorable and 6% more favorable. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted January 9 - 12, 2014 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,006 adults age 18 or older, including 504 cell phone interviews.


Public’s Views on Human Evolution    Friday, January 03, 2014
According to a new Pew Research Center analysis, six-in-ten Americans (60%) say that “humans and other living things have evolved over time,” while a third (33%) reject the idea of evolution, saying that “humans and other living things have existed in their present form since the beginning of time.” The share of the general public that says that humans have evolved over time is about the same as it was in 2009, when Pew Research last asked the question. About half of those who express a belief in human evolution take the view that evolution is “due to natural processes such as natural selection” (32% of the American public overall). But many Americans believe that God or a supreme being played a role in the process of evolution. Indeed, roughly a quarter of adults (24%) say that “a supreme being guided the evolution of living things for the purpose of creating humans and other life in the form it exists today.” These beliefs differ strongly by religious group. White evangelical Protestants are particularly likely to believe that humans have existed in their present form since the beginning of time. Roughly two-thirds (64%) express this view, as do half of black Protestants (50%). By comparison, only 15% of white mainline Protestants share this opinion. There also are sizable differences by party affiliation in beliefs about evolution, and the gap between Republicans and Democrats has grown. In 2009, 54% of Republicans and 64% of Democrats said humans have evolved over time, a difference of 10 percentage points. Today, 43% of Republicans and 67% of Democrats say humans have evolved, a 24-point gap. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted March 21 - April 8, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,983 adults age 18 or older.


Kaiser Health Tracking Poll: December 2013    Monday, December 30, 2013
The Latest Kaiser Health Tracking Poll finds a 13 percentage point rebound in support for the Affordable Care Act (ACA) among Democrats this month, but no overall movement in support or opposition to the ACA since the November poll found a negative shift in views following the problem-plagued rollout of the law. In December, 34 percent have a favorable view of the ACA and 48 percent have an unfavorable view.  The share of Americans that expect to see no personal impact from the law reached a new high in Kaiser polling this month and now stands at nearly half the public. Still, the public is more likely to attribute negative consequences to the law (believing it has increased the federal deficit and caused many people to lose their insurance coverage) than to say it has had positive effects (such as lowering prescription costs for seniors, eliminating cost-sharing for preventive services, and providing rebates to consumers whose health plans spent too much on administration).  Americans are divided on what they would like Congress to do next with the law, with about four in ten wanting the law to be expanded or kept as is and a similar share wanting to see it repealed (either being replaced with a Republican alternative or repealed and not replaced). This month’s survey also highlights some of the problems the uninsured continue to experience in accessing and paying for health care; for example, the uninsured are about twice as likely as those with insurance to report problems paying medical bills, and four times as likely to say they had trouble getting medical care in the past year. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted December 10-15, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,206 adults age 18 or older, including 604 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: In Deficit Debate, Public Resists Cuts in Entitlements and Aid to Poor    Thursday, December 19, 2013
As President Obama prepares to sign a bipartisan budget agreement that its proponents describe as a modest step toward addressing the deficit, the public shows little appetite for making some of the spending cuts often discussed as part of a broader “grand bargain” on the budget. Spending for Entitlements, Aid to Poor Favored over Deficit ReductionThe latest national survey by the Pew Research Center, conducted Dec. 3-8 among 2,001 adults, finds majorities say it is more important to maintain spending on Social Security and Medicare and programs to help the poor than to take steps to reduce the budget deficit. Nearly seven-in-ten (69%) say it is more important to maintain current Social Security and Medicare benefits than to reduce the deficit, while 59% prioritize keeping current levels of spending for programs that help the poor and needy over deficit reduction. There is greater public support for cutting military spending in order to achieve deficit reduction. About half of Americans (51%) say reducing the deficit is more important than keeping military spending at current levels, while 40% say deficit reduction is more important. Views of tradeoffs between government spending and deficit reduction are divided along partisan lines, and the differences are especially pronounced when it comes to programs that aid the poor and needy. Fully 84% of Democrats say it is more important to keep current spending levels for these programs than to reduce the deficit. A majority of Republicans (55%) say cutting the deficit is more important than maintaining current spending for programs to help the poor. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted December 3-8, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 2,001 adults age 18 or older, including 1,001 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: No Improvement in Public’s Views of Economic News    Wednesday, December 18, 2013
As the Federal Reserve meets to discuss whether to keep up its $85-billion-a-month bond-buying program, the public’s perceptions of recent economic news have shown little change. Six-in-ten (60%) are hearing a mix of good and bad news about the economy. Far more say they are hearing mostly bad news about the economy (31%) than mostly good news (7%). These views have not changed much over the past two years, although the percentage hearing mostly bad news is up five points since August. The new national survey by the Pew Research Center, conducted Dec. 12-15 among 1,000 adults, finds that perceptions of recent job news remain more negative than positive. Currently, 40% are hearing mostly bad news about jobs, while just 14% are hearing mostly good news; 41% say the news is mixed. These views also have changed little over the past year. News about prices for food and consumer goods also is seen as more bad than good: 45% say recent news about prices has been mostly bad while just 9% say it has been mostly good, with 40% saying it has been mixed. The stock market has made major gains in 2013, but just 17% are hearing mostly good news about financial markets; 28% say the news is mostly bad and 46% say it is a mix of good and bad. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted December 12-15, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,000 adults age 18 or older, including 500 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: Republicans More Optimistic than Democrats about Midterms    Friday, December 13, 2013
Less than a year out from the 2014 midterm elections, Republicans are more optimistic than Democrats about their party’s electoral prospects. But the “expectations gap” is far more modest now than it was prior to the 2010 election, when Republicans were brimming with confidence, or 2006, when most Democrats anticipated a midterm victory. The new national survey by the Pew Research Center and USA TODAY, finds that 55% of Republican and Republican-leaning registered voters expect the GOP to do better than it has in recent elections, 33% think it will do about the same, while just 5% say it will do worse. Democrats and Democratic leaners are less confident: 43% say the party will do better than in recent elections, 43% about the same and 9% worse. Partisans’ predictions are more closely divided than during either the 2006 or 2010 midterm election cycles. At a later point in the 2010 campaign (June 2010), fully 72% of Republican voters were confident in their party’s chances to do better in the midterms. By contrast, just 29% of Democrats thought their party would do better in 2010 than in recent elections. At this point in the 2006 election, Democrats were highly confident of victory. In December 2005, 64% of Democratic and Democratic-leaning voters expected their party to do better in the 2006 midterms than in other recent elections; just 16% of Republican voters felt the same way about the GOP’s prospects. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted December 3-8, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 2,001 adults age 18 or older, including 1,001 cell phone interviews.

Reason-Rupe December 2013 National Survey    Friday, December 13, 2013
At a recent event, President Barack Obama said the health care law is here to stay and vowed, "We aren't going back.” But 55 percent of Americans say they’d prefer to go back to the health care system that was in place before the Affordable Care Act, while 34 percent prefer the current health care system.  The latest Reason-Rupe national telephone poll finds the Affordable Care Act’s troubled launch has made 47 percent of Americans less confident in government’s ability to solve problems. Forty-one percent say the troubles have made no difference and 11 percent say the health care law’s launch has given them more confidence in the government. “This is the most transparent administration in history,” President Obama has declared. However, 57 percent of Americans tell Reason-Rupe that the Obama administration is not the most transparent administration in history, while 37 percent agree with the president’s statement.  A majority of Americans, 52 percent, say they disagree with President Obama’s views about the proper size and power of government, while 38 percent agree with the president. Fifty-four percent of those surveyed feel government is generally a “burdensome part of society that impedes the ability of people to improve their lives,” while 41 percent feel “government is primarily a source of good and helps people improve their lives.” The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted December 4-8, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,011 adults age 18 or older, including 506 cell phone interviews.

Poll: End Workplace Discrimination Against Gays    Wednesday, December 11, 2013
A strong majority of Americans say they support the Employment Non-Discrimination Act, legislation that would ban most private businesses from workplace discrimination based on sexual orientation or gender identity, according to the latest United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection Poll. A plurality of Republicans dissent, the survey found, but their objections fade if the measure applied only to sexual orientation. The numbers underscore the degree to which public opinion has swung in favor of expanding gay rights, even if support lags for transgender men and women. And they demonstrate the predicament facing Republicans, who more often than not now find themselves on the losing end of the culture war. Like immigration, some types of gun control, and—increasingly—gay marriage, the GOP opposes legislation that draws support from a majority of the country. In November, 10 Republicans joined with Democrats to approve ENDA in the Senate. But the GOP-controlled House has shelved the legislation, and there's little hope among its supporters that it will receive a vote on the floor. In the poll, respondents were told the Senate had passed legislation that supporters "say is necessary to ensure that all workers are treated equally whether they are heterosexual or homosexual," while opponents "say it will lead to unnecessary lawsuits and impinge on religious freedom." They were then asked if they supported the measure and if it should include transgender people.The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted December 5 to 8, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,002 adults age 18 or older, including 501 cell phone interviews.

Majority of Americans Say Bag Sequestration    Tuesday, December 10, 2013
As congressional negotiators work toward a budget deal to avoid another government shutdown, a majority of Americans appear to want some sort of agreement to be struck that would avoid triggering another round of automatic government budget cuts. According to the most recent United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection Poll, a commanding majority of those surveyed, 61 percent, would undo all or some of the automatic sequester cuts, which remain the law of the land. Just 18 percent favored enacting all of the required cuts. Should Sen. Patty Murray and Rep. Paul Ryan, who cochair the budget conference committee, fail to reach a deal before the end of the week, it's possible Congress will be forced to pass a resolution to fund the government at the spending levels called for by the sequester, which sits at $967 billion for the current fiscal year. Should they reach a deal, it could fund the government at a higher level and reverse some of the sequester cuts. But the public remains divided on how to pay for increased spending if some of the sequester cuts are to be avoided. In fact, just 29 percent of those who oppose the automatic cuts say that the savings should come from cuts to Medicare, Medicaid, and Social Security. A solid 73 percent of those surveyed instead believe the savings should be secured by raising taxes on the wealthy by eliminating tax credits and deductions—a strategy that Republicans have rejected. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted December 5 to 8, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,002 adults age 18 or older, including 501 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: Obama Job Rating Regains Some Ground, But 2013 Has Taken a Toll    Tuesday, December 10, 2013
For the first time since last spring, Barack Obama’s steadily declining job rating has shown a modest improvement. And while his signature legislative accomplishment – the 2010 health care law – remains unpopular, Obama engenders much more public confidence on health care policy than do Republican leaders in Congress. The flawed rollout of the health care law has registered with the public, with an increasing number of Americans saying its effect on the country so far has been negative. However, assessments of the law’s future impact are little changed and, if anything, have become slightly more positive. The national survey by the Pew Research Center and USA TODAY finds that despite the recent uptick in Obama’s job rating, his standing with the public is much worse today than it was at the start of the year. The percentage viewing Obama as “not trustworthy” has risen 15 points since January – from 30% to 45%. There has been a comparable increase in the share saying he is “not able to get things done” (from 37% to 51%). Yet, Obama’s job rating has reversed a six-month slide. Currently, 45% approve of the way he is handling his job as president while 49% disapprove. In early November, amid the widely criticized rollout of health care exchanges and the Healthcare.gov website, 41% approved of his job performance and 53% disapproved. His job rating had been as high as 51% in May and 55% in December 2012, shortly after he won reelection. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted December 3 to 8, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 2,001 adults age 18 or older, including 1,001 cell phone interviews.

Majority of Republican Men Support Universal Background Checks on Gun Sales    Friday, December 06, 2013
A majority of Republican and Republican-leaning men, 53 percent, would be "very pleased" or "somewhat pleased" if legislation requiring universal background checks on all gun sales was passed by Congress and signed by the president, according to the latest United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection Poll. The results quantify the broad popularity of expanding background checks on firearms purchases across the political spectrum, even among a segment of the public usually opposed to gun-control measures. Support for universal background checks ranges from mild among Republican men to strong among Republican women to almost wild among Democrats. Three-quarters of Democrats said they would be "very pleased" to see background-check legislation enacted—more than the 64 percent of Republicans who said they would be "very pleased" if the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, was repealed. At first glance, the political downside to background-check legislation is virtually nonexistent: Just 14 percent of all Americans and just 19 percent of Republicans said they would be "very disappointed" if such a law was enacted. Among Republican women, just 12 percent said the same. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted November 21-24, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,003 adults age 18 or older, including 503 cell phone interviews.

Americans See Little Chance of Better Obama-Congress Relationship in 2014    Thursday, December 05, 2013
Americans say the relationship between President Obama and Congress was more frayed than usual in 2013—and, if anything, only likely to get worse next year. The first year of Obama's second term has been marked by a government shutdown, no significant legislative achievements, and incessant bickering between the administration and Capitol Hill, prompting 57 percent of Americans to say the White House and Congress are cooperating less than usual, according to the latest United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection Poll. Only 5 percent of Americans said Obama and Congress cooperated more than usual this year. The survey has a margin of error of plus or minus 3.6 percentage points. With Congress on track to pass the fewest new laws this year since at least 1947, Americans are even more pessimistic about a renewed cooperative spirit emerging in 2014, when the congressional midterm elections will be held. While 16 percent of poll respondents said they expected more cooperation next year, 60 percent said the level of cooperation would stay as bad as it is today, and 23 percent predicted relations would deteriorate even further. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted November 21-24, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,003 adults age 18 or older, including 503 cell phone interviews.

November 2013 Financial Security Index charts    Monday, November 25, 2013
Bankrate's monthly survey of six questions measures how secure Americans feel about their personal finances compared with 12 months ago. This month, the index rose to 99.3, up 1.9 points from October. 29 percent of people making at least $75,000 prioritize paying down debts, compared to 16 percent of other respondents. 52 percent of people making less than $30,000 are focused on staying on top of bills, versus just 28 percent of people earning more than that. 27 percent of 18-29-year-olds are concentrating on saving, while just 15 percent of those 30-and-older say the same thing. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted November 7-10, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,003 adults age 18 or older, including 502 cell phone interviews.

Pew Forum: Views on End-of-Life Medical Treatments    Monday, November 25, 2013
At a time of national debate over health care costs and insurance, a Pew Research Center survey on end-of-life decisions finds most Americans say there are some circumstances in which doctors and nurses should allow a patient to die. At the same time, however, a growing minority says that medical professionals should do everything possible to save a patient’s life in all circumstances. When asked about end-of-life decisions for other people, two-thirds of Americans (66%) say there are at least some situations in which a patient should be allowed to die, while nearly a third (31%) say that medical professionals always should do everything possible to save a patient’s life. Over the last quarter-century, the balance of opinion has moved modestly away from the majority position on this issue. While still a minority, the share of the public that says doctors and nurses should do everything possible to save a patient’s life has gone up 9 percentage points since 2005 and 16 points since 1990. The uptick comes partly from a modest decline in the share that says there are circumstances in which a patient should be allowed to die and partly from an increase in the share of the public that expresses an opinion; the portion that has no opinion or declines to answer the survey question went down from 12% in 1990 to 8% in 2005 and now stands at 3%. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted November 7-10, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 4,006 adults age 18 or older, including 2,002 cell phone interviews.

Kaiser Health Tracking Poll: November 2013    Friday, November 22, 2013
The latest Kaiser Health Tracking Poll finds the public’s views souring on the Affordable Care Act (ACA) in November, with about half having an unfavorable view of the law and a third having a favorable view, a gap that was seen only once before, during the Republican presidential primaries in 2011. This negative shift in opinion comes amid heavy news coverage of the website problems plaguing the law’s online health insurance exchanges and stories about individuals being dropped from their insurance coverage because their plans don’t meet minimum requirements set by the ACA, stories that were followed closely by more than half the American public this month. The partisan divide on the law continues, but support among Democrats dropped sharply this month after rallying in September and October. Views among women also shifted this month, and for the first time in Kaiser tracking, the share of women with an unfavorable view outnumbered those with a favorable view by a large margin (48 percent versus 32 percent). Visibility of the health insurance exchanges increased among the public overall in November, but reaching the uninsured with information remains a challenge – about four in ten uninsured say they’ve heard nothing at all about the new marketplaces to date, and two-thirds say they still don’t have enough information about the law to know how it will impact them. Still, nearly six in ten of those who currently lack coverage say they plan to get insurance in 2014. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted November 13-18, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,204 adults age 18 or older, including 602 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: Philippines Disaster Draws Limited Interest, Donations    Tuesday, November 19, 2013
The aftermath of Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines is drawing less attention from the American public than a number of other major international disasters in recent years. About one-in-three Americans (32%) say they are very closely following news about the deadly typhoon that struck the Philippines on Nov. 8. By comparison, 55% of the public closely followed the aftermath of the 2011 tsunami in Japan, 58% followed the tsunami that struck coastlines around the Indian Ocean at the end of 2004, and 60% followed the 2010 Haiti earthquake. In the new national survey, Typhoon Haiyan tied with economic news as the second-most closely followed story this week. The health care rollout was the public’s top story, with 37% following it very closely. Attention to the Philippines typhoon is similar to the levels of interest in the 2008 earthquake in China (30% followed closely) and the 2010 earthquake in Chile (27%). One-in-Three Plans to Donate to Philippines ReliefUp to this point, the share of Americans making donations to the Philippines trails donations to natural disasters that got more attention: 14% say they have donated to storm relief efforts. The share of the public that has donated so far is somewhat less than after the disasters in Haiti, Japan or the Indian Ocean. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted November 14-17, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,013 adults age 18 or older, including 506 cell phone interviews.

Public Agrees on Obesity’s Impact, Not Government’s Role    Tuesday, November 12, 2013
Most Americans (69%) see obesity as a very serious public health problem, substantially more than the percentages viewing alcohol abuse, cigarette smoking and AIDS in the same terms. In addition, a broad majority believes that obesity is not just a problem that affects individuals: 63% say obesity has consequences for society beyond the personal impact on individuals. Just 31% say it impacts the individuals who are obese but not society more broadly. Yet, the public has mixed opinions about what, if anything, the government should do about the issue. A 54% majority does not want the government to play a significant role in reducing obesity, while 42% say the government should play a significant role. And while some proposals for reducing obesity draw broad support, others are decidedly unpopular. The new national survey by the Pew Research Center finds that two-thirds (67%) favor requiring chain restaurants to list calorie counts on menus. But just 31% support limits on the size of sugary soft drinks in restaurants and convenience stores – 67% oppose this idea. More than half (55%) favor banning TV ads of unhealthy foods during children’s programming, but barely a third (35%) supports raising taxes on sugary soft drinks and unhealthy foods. On each of these policies, Democrats and women are more supportive than Republicans, independents and men. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted October 30- November 6, 2013 by 2,003 adults age 18 or older, including 1,002 cell phone interviews.

Why Minorities Are More Optimistic About the Value of College    Friday, November 08, 2013
Jason Parkinson, a 29-year-old electrician from Cleveland, doesn't consider it much of a handicap that he never obtained a four-year college degree after high school. "It doesn't do any good anymore," he says. "You get a four-year degree, you work at a fast-food restaurant. You can go to trades and manufacturing…. I'm not big on going to college for a career that might not even be there in 10 years." Those contrasting responses from Parkinson, who is white, and Stathas, who is Hispanic, point to one of the most intriguing findings in a new College Board/National Journal Next America Poll. While minorities worry more than whites about affording the cost of higher education, they are more likely to see a payoff from the investment for themselves and for the country overall. The survey, which measures assessments of the pathways to opportunity, found broad agreement among whites, African-Americans, Hispanics, and Asian-Americans that the U.S. still provides young people from any racial background an adequate chance to succeed—and that the primary and secondary schools in their neighborhood are preparing them to do so. But on several fronts, the poll said minorities were considerably more optimistic than whites that more access to education will mean more opportunity, both personally and throughout the economy. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted October 14-24, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,272 adults age 18 or older, including 675 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: Most Say Monitoring Allied Leaders’ Calls Is Unacceptable    Monday, November 04, 2013
In the wake of reports that the National Security Agency (NSA) has been listening to phone calls of German Chancellor Angela Merkel and other heads of state, a 56% majority of Americans say it is unacceptable for the U.S. to monitor the phones of allied leaders, while 36% say the practice is acceptable. There are virtually no partisan differences in these opinions. Roughly equal shares of partisans — 57% of Republicans, 53% of Democrats and 56% of independents — say that the practice is unacceptable. News reports indicate that President Obama was unaware of the program to tap Merkel’s phone and that he might ban future eavesdropping of allied leaders. The new national survey by the Pew Research Center finds that 22% say they very closely followed reports about the U.S. government’s phone and internet surveillance programs. That is similar to the share that paid very close attention to stories about government surveillance in September and over the summer. Attention was highest in mid-June, when 35% said they were following reports about the initial disclosures by Edward Snowden. The public followed reports about the government’s surveillance programs less closely than news about the new health insurance exchanges (32%) and the U.S. economy (31%). By comparison, 16% followed baseball’s World Series very closely. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted October 31 - November 2, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,002 adults age 18 or older, including 501 cell phone interviews.

Photo and Video Sharing Grow Online    Monday, October 28, 2013
A new study by the Pew Research Center’s Internet Project shows that 54% of internet users have posted original photos or videos to websites and 47% share photos or videos they found elsewhere online. The mobile landscape has also added to photo- and video-sharing. Apps like Snapchat and Instagram have capitalized on the ubiquity of cell phones and smartphones that make it simple to upload and share images. Some 9% of cell phone owners use Snapchat and 18% use Instagram. This is the first time the Pew Internet Project has asked cell owners about Snapchat and Instagram. “Sharing photos and videos online adds texture, play, and drama to people’s interactions in their social networks,” said Pew Internet’s Maeve Duggan, author of a report on the new findings. “Pictures document life from a special angle, whether they relate to small moments, personal milestones, or larger news and events. Mobile connectivity has brought these visuals into countless lives in real-time. This all adds up to a new kind of collective digital scrapbook with fresh forms of storytelling and social bonding.” The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted October 3-6, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,000 adults age 18 or older, including 500 cell phone interviews.

October 2013 Financial Security Index    Tuesday, October 22, 2013
Bankrate's monthly survey measures how secure Americans feel about their personal finances compared to 12 months ago. The results of Bankrate's Financial Security Index have a margin of error of plus or minus 3.7 percentage points. This month, the index declined to 97.4, down 2.1 points from September. 81% of parents with kids under 18 say they have reasons to limit their spending, versus 68% of people who don't have kids younger than 18. There were no major differences in how people of different income classes answered this question. 34% of people 65 and older say they have no reason to limit their spending, compared to 26% of those who are younger. Job fears are what's most holding down spending for 10% of respondents earning $75,000 a year or more, compared to just 4% of respondents making less than $30,000. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted October 3-6, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,000 adults age 18 or older, including 500 cell phone interviews.


Nearly half say replace everyone in Congress    Monday, October 21, 2013
The impasse that shut down much of the federal government for 16 days has left Americans in the sort of throw-the-bums-out mood that presaged two recent tumultuous elections in which control of the House of Representatives shifted from one party to the other. In a nationwide USA TODAY/Princeton Survey Research Poll, just 4% of those surveyed — equal to the margin of error — say Congress would be changed for the worse if nearly every member was replaced next year. Nearly half say it would work better. About four in 10 say a wholesale overhaul wouldn't make much difference. Those findings are similar to the public's views in previous years when voter dismay cost one side or the other control of the House. In 1994, when Democrats lost their majority, 40% said Congress would be better off if most members were replaced. In 2006, when Republicans lost control, 42% held that view. Now 47% say Congress would work better if nearly every seat changed hands next year. (The question wasn't asked in 2010, when Republicans regained control.) Among Republicans and Republican leaners, a 52% majority say Congress would be better off if most of the current members were replaced — even though the GOP now controls the House and holds most of those seats. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted October 17-20, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,001 adults age 18 or older, including 501 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: Partisans Dug in on Budget, Health Care Impasse    Tuesday, October 08, 2013
Nearly a week into the first government shutdown in more than 17 years, most Americans express frustration and concern about the situation. Yet on the core issue dividing Republicans and Democrats in Washington – whether cuts or delays to the 2010 health care law should be part of any budget deal – there is little support for compromise among members of either party. The national survey by the Pew Research Center, conducted Oct. 3-6 among 1,000 adults, finds 44% say Republican leaders should give ground on their demand that any budget deal include cuts or delays to the 2010 health care law. Nearly as many (42%) say it is Obama who should give ground, by agreeing to changes in the health care law. Even when asked if the only way to end the shutdown soon is for their side to give ground on the health care issue, most are unwilling to back down. A majority of Democrats (58%) say it would be unacceptable for Obama to agree to cuts or delays in the Affordable Care Act, even if this is the only way to resolve the shutdown soon. Roughly the same share of Republicans (54%) say it would be unacceptable for GOP leaders to agree to any deal that does not include cuts or delays to Obamacare. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted October 3-6, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,000 adults age 18 or older, including 500 cell phone interviews.

Don't Tie Shutdown to Obamacare Funding    Monday, October 07, 2013
Americans are divided on who deserves blame for the government shutdown, but one thing's certain: A solid majority thinks it's wrong to demand changes to Obamacare as a price for reopening the government. The latest United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection Poll finds little consensus on whom to blame for shutting down the government—38 percent say it's the Republicans, 30 percent say it's President Obama, and 19 percent say it's both. But public opinion is clearer on the House GOP's approach: Overwhelmingly, Americans think Congress should fund the federal government and deal with health care separately; and just as strongly, Americans oppose including GOP priorities—even those with which they otherwise agree—in a bargain to raise the debt ceiling. The results portend political risk for Republicans should they continue to employ their current approach. Americans oppose those tactics, the data show, and if the government breaches its debt limit, triggering broad-based economic turmoil, Americans could hold Republicans responsible. Half of the poll's respondents disapprove of Obama's handling of negotiations over the shutdown, according to results from the same survey commissioned by the Pew Research Center. But congressional GOP leaders still score worse on this measure: 69 percent disapprove of the way they are handling the budget negotiations, while only 19 percent approve. Congressional Democrats fall in between: 29 percent approve and 58 percent disapprove. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted October 3-6, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,001 adults age 18 or older, including 500 cell phone interviews.

Republican Rebranding Shows No Sign of Working    Tuesday, October 01, 2013
Despite months of Republican talk about rebranding the party to broaden its appeal, nearly half of all Americans say the GOP hasn't changed much since it lost the 2012 presidential election. According to the latest United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection Poll, 46 percent of respondents said "there has been no change" in the Republican Party's views since the 2012 election. Thirty-two percent of respondents said the GOP is "further from representing" their own views, twice as many as those who said the party has gotten closer to them (16 percent). Not surprisingly, Democrats were most likely to say the GOP has moved further away from their views, but a majority of independent voters (52 percent) said they had seen no changes in the GOP's views since the last election. In the months after the 2012 election, the Republican National Committee planned an "autopsy" of the party's electoral failures. Part of the report's goal was mechanical: President Obama's win demonstrated that the Democratic Party's get-out-the-vote and targeting techniques had outstripped the GOP's, and party leaders wanted to close the gap. But another goal was to lay the groundwork for a more inclusive Republican Party. Presidential nominee Mitt Romney essentially matched his party's best-ever showing by a challenger among white voters, but it was not enough to win the White House, partly because Obama matched Democrats' best-ever performance among Hispanic voters. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted September 25-29, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,005 adults age 18 or older, including 503 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: Anger at Government Most Pronounced among Conservative Republicans    Monday, September 30, 2013
With a possible government shutdown just hours away, public anger at the federal government is as high as at any point since the Pew Research Center began asking the question in 1997. Anger is most palpable among conservative Republicans – 41% say they are angry at the federal government, the highest among any partisan group. The new national survey by the Pew Research Center finds that 26% overall say they are angry at the federal government, while 51% feel frustrated. Just 17% say they are basically content with the government. The share of Americans who say they are angry at the federal government has risen seven points since January and now equals the high reached in August 2011, a few weeks after the widely criticized debt ceiling agreement between the president and Congress. As in the past, substantial majorities across the political spectrum are either angry or frustrated with the federal government. But anger at the government is far more widespread among conservative Republicans than other partisan groups. This marks a change from 2011, when political independents (30% angry) were about as likely as conservative Republicans (32%) to express anger at the federal government. In the new survey, 41% of conservative Republicans say they feel angry at the government, compared with 27% of independents. Conservative Republicans are roughly twice as likely as liberal Democrats to say they are angry with government (41% vs. 18%). The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted September 25-29, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,005 adults age 18 or older, including 503 cell phone interviews.

Huge Majority Thinks Washington Can Reduce Gun Violence    Tuesday, September 24, 2013
Americans overwhelmingly think there is something Washington can do to reduce gun violence, but pronounced splits on the specific legislative fix underscore the difficulty Congress would face passing a bill. In the wake of the mass shooting at the Washington Navy Yard, 71 percent of respondents in the latest United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection Poll agreed that "there's something that can be done through public policies" that would help seriously reduce mass shootings. The sentiment was broadly popular across gender, race, and party lines; only 24 percent of respondents disagreed. Among whites, men without college educations were most likely to oppose that statement, but most (64 percent) still supported it. The results echo President Obama's appeal to the country to not view gun violence as inevitable after a string of high-profile mass shootings. "Sometimes I fear there's a creeping resignation that these tragedies are just somehow the way it is, that this is somehow the new normal," Obama said in a memorial speech on Sunday. Later, he said: "I do not accept that we cannot find a commonsense way to preserve our traditions, including our basic Second Amendment freedoms and the rights of law-abiding gun owners, while at the same time reducing the gun violence that unleashes so much mayhem on a regular basis." The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted September 19-22, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,003 adults age 18 or older, including 500 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: Blame for Both Sides as Possible Government Shutdown Approaches    Monday, September 23, 2013
If the federal government shuts down because Republicans and the Obama administration fail to agree on a budget, there will be plenty of blame to go around. About as many say they would blame the Republicans (39%) for such a standoff as say they would blame Obama (36%), with 17% volunteering that both would be equally to blame. This parallels the divided sentiment on the eve of the budget standoff in the spring of 2011, which was ultimately averted. But opinions are notably different today than they were during the budget battle of 1995. A November 1995 Washington Post/ABC News survey asked a similar question and found that 46% said a shutdown would mainly be the fault of the Republican Congress; just 27% said the bulk of the blame would fall on the Clinton administration. The Pew Research Center survey finds that the public is divided over whether a budget deal will be reached by the Sept. 30 deadline for shutting down the government: 46% say the two sides will reach a budget agreement, 45% say they will not. As in past congressional showdowns over fiscal issues, most Americans (57%) want the lawmakers they agree with on this issue to be more willing to compromise, even if it means passing a budget they disagree with. Just a third (33%) wants lawmakers to stand by their principles, even if the federal government shuts down. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted September 19-22, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,003 adults age 18 or older, including 500 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: Public Backs Diplomatic Approach in Syria, But Distrusts Syria and Russia    Tuesday, September 17, 2013
As U.S. and Russian diplomats reached an agreement over the weekend to dismantle Syria’s chemical weapons stockpiles, the public expresses support for a diplomatic approach to the crisis but is skeptical about its effectiveness. By a 67% to 23% margin, the public approves of Barack Obama’s decision to delay military airstrikes and pursue a diplomatic effort to convince Syria to give up its chemical weapons. However, just 26% think Syria will give up control of its chemical weapons, while 57% think it will not. More generally, the public has little trust in Syria. Just 8% say the United States can trust Syria a great deal or a fair amount, while 63% say Syria cannot be trusted at all and another 22% say it can’t be trusted much. The public is skeptical of Russia as well: just 24% say the United States can trust Russia even a fair amount, down from 33% last year. The latest Pew Research Center survey was conducted as the United States and Russia concluded an agreement providing for inspection of Syria’s chemical weapons this fall, with destruction of the arms slated to begin next year. Because of the timing of the poll, it did not specifically ask about the U.S.-Russia agreement. The Obama administration has reiterated that military airstrikes are still possible if Syria does not cooperate fully with the disarmament process, but the public remains, on balance, opposed to the use of force even under these circumstances. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted September 12-15, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,002 adults age 18 or older, including 501 cell phone interviews.

Pew/USA Today Poll: As Health Care Law Proceeds, Opposition and Uncertainty Persist    Monday, September 16, 2013
As a key step in the implementation of the Affordable Care Act approaches, public views of the 2010 health care law are as negative as ever, and many are unaware of the elements of the law that will be going into place. While opposition to the law runs deep, critics are divided over whether the effort should be to make the law work as well as possible or to make it fail. With health insurance exchanges set to open on Oct. 1, the latest national survey by the Pew Research Center and USA TODAY finds that 53% of Americans disapprove of the law while 42% approve. Overall approval of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) ticked up last July in the wake of the Supreme Court’s decision to uphold most of the law (47% approved, 43% disapproved), but opinions are now as negative as they have been any point since the bill’s passage. The 53% of the public who disapprove of the law are divided over what they would like elected officials who oppose the law to do now that the law has begun to take effect. About half of disapprovers (27% of the public overall) say these lawmakers “should do what they can to make the law work as well as possible,” but nearly as many (23% of the public) say these officials “should do what they can to make the law fail.” This strategic question is a particular point of conflict within the Republican Party. Overall, just 13% of Republicans and Republican-leaning independents approve of the law while 85% disapprove. Fewer than half of all Republicans and Republican leaners (43%) want elected officials who oppose the law to do what they can to make it fail; 37% say they should try to make it work as well as possible. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted September 4-8, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,506 adults age 18 or older, including 755 cell phone interviews.

Reason-Rupe September 2013 National Survey    Monday, September 16, 2013
Public says Obama disappoints on transparency, Congress passes too many laws, split on Snowden, Facebook trusted less than the IRS on privacy, and no bailout for Detroit. With the federal government expected to hit its debt limit in mid-October, 70 percent of Americans oppose raising the debt ceiling, the latest Reason-Rupe poll finds. In fact, 55 percent of Americans say they do not support raising the debt ceiling even if it causes the U.S. to default on its debt. If equal spending cuts accompany an increase in the debt ceiling, 45 percent say they'd support raising it and 46 percent would oppose. Thirty-five percent favor raising the debt ceiling in exchange for cutting off funding to the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, with 56 percent opposed. Nearly two-thirds, 63 percent, of Americans feel members of Congress are out of touch with their constituents when it comes to federal spending.  Seventy-six percent of Americans believe the federal government spends too much money, 11 percent say it spends the right amount, and 7 percent say it spends too little. In response to open-ended questions, Americans told Reason-Rupe the government wastes 60 cents out of every dollar they pay in federal taxes and they'd cut federal spending by 30 percent across the board. Rep. Paul Ryan's (R-WI) 2013 budget plan aims to balance the federal budget over 10 years, but Reason-Rupe finds the public wants it done sooner than that. In fact, 40 percent of Americans say Congress should balance the budget immediately, 32 percent say the budget should be balanced over five years, 16 percent feel it should be balanced over 10 years, and 7 percent say Congress should not worry about balancing the budget. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted September 4-8, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,013 adults age 18 or older, including 509 cell phone interviews.

Americans Oppose Syria Strike, but Won't Punish Lawmakers for Supporting It    Thursday, September 12, 2013
Lawmakers have hemmed and hawed this month about whether to support a military strike against Syria, anxious to avoid the political repercussions of either decision. But it turns out most voters wouldn't care enough either way to throw their representative out of office. Fifty-five percent of Americans say if their member of Congress voted for a proposed strike, it would not affect whether they would support the lawmaker's reelection, according to the latest United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection Poll. That's a testament to the issue's overhyped political implications, despite this month's fervent public debate over its merits. In any case, President Obama's decision Tuesday night to delay the vote while he seeks a diplomatic solution to Syria's use of chemical weapons might make the point moot. Despite the public's apathy, many lawmakers had already declared they would not support the resolution, and it looked to face long odds in the House. More adults did say supporting the strike would make them less likely to back their incumbent. Just 13 percent of men and women said backing it would make them more likely to support the lawmaker; double that number, 26 percent, said they'd be less likely. Five percent of respondents said they didn't know how to answer or refused to do so. If there's any risk with taking a stance on Syria, it comes from Republican primary voters. Thirty-five percent of GOP members said they would be less inclined to back their lawmaker, while only 13 percent said they'd be more likely to support their reelection. Their antipathy helps explain the rush of many Republicans in office to publicly declare their opposition to the strike. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted September 5-8, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,002 adults age 18 or older, including 502 cell phone interviews.

Americans Reject World Police Role, Fear Being Drawn Into War    Wednesday, September 11, 2013
Americans are far more worried that military strikes against Syria will drag the nation further into that country's civil war than the possibility that staying away will embolden despots in other nations to deploy weapons of mass destruction. That's the finding of the latest United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection Poll, which also found that fewer than two in five Americans believe the United States has an obligation to punish foreign governments that deploy weapons of mass destruction to kill civilians. Taken together, the results show a nation wary of further entanglements 12 years removed from the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, and after the prolonged military conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. The survey also shows that Republicans, long the nation's more hawkish party, are now among those most skittish of further interventions abroad. That can be partly explained away by the fact that President Obama, a Democrat, is leading the current call for strikes against Syria. But it is also evidence that the libertarian, noninterventionist wing within the GOP is growing at the grassroots level. It is tension likely to play out in the 2016 Republican presidential primary. The poll, which was conducted before Obama's national address Tuesday and his blitz of network interviews Monday, found that a 50 percent majority said they are more concerned about being "drawn more deeply" into war in Syria. Only 32 percent said they are more concerned that not taking military action would embolden other nations to use mass-destruction weapons.The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted September 5-8, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,002 adults age 18 or older, including 502 cell phone interviews.

Americans Overwhelmingly Oppose Syria Strike, Want Obama to Back Down    Tuesday, September 10, 2013
President Obama continues to face broad public opposition to military intervention in Syria and an overwhelming consensus that he should not launch attacks if Congress denies him authorization, the latest United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection Poll has found. As the president prepares to make his case in a nationally televised address, the survey found that opposition to intervention in Syria largely transcends the partisan, racial, age, and regional boundaries that fracture the public on almost all other major issues. Not only do solid majorities of Republicans and independents oppose the use of force against Syria but so does a strong plurality of Democrats, according to the poll. Only a meager 13 percent of those polled--including just one-fifth of Democrats--say Obama should strike Syria anyway if Congress does not approve. On the broadest question, the survey noted that "the Obama administration has concluded that the government of Syria used chemical weapons, including nerve gas, to kill over 1,400 civilians last month" and asked respondents how the U.S. should respond. A solid 55 percent majority said the U.S. should "do nothing and stay out of the Syrian civil war." Just 21 percent endorsed the option Obama prefers: launching "a limited military strike, using only air power, to punish the Syrian government for using chemical weapons." Few preferred more-aggressive options, with 6 percent saying the U.S. should mount a sustained air campaign "to help rebels overthrow the Syrian government" and 6 percent more saying the U.S. should pursue regime change with both air power and ground troops. The final 12 percent said they didn't know what the U.S. should do. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted September 5-8, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,002 adults age 18 or older, including 502 cell phone interviews.

Pew/USA Today Poll: Opposition to Syrian Airstrikes Surges    Tuesday, September 10, 2013
Over just the past week, the share of Americans who oppose U.S. airstrikes in Syria has surged 15 points, from 48% to 63%, as many who were undecided about the issue have turned against military action. By contrast, the share of Americans who support airstrikes remains virtually unchanged: Just 28% favor U.S. military airstrikes against Syria in response to reports that its government used chemical weapons. The new survey by the Pew Research Center and USA TODAY, conducted Sept. 4-8, 2013 among 1,506 adults nationwide, finds that this growing opposition to Syrian airstrikes is intense: 45% say they oppose airstrikes very strongly. That is roughly three-times the percentage (16%) that strongly favors airstrikes. Republicans, in particular, have turned against Syrian airstrikes. A week ago, Republicans were divided about evenly: 35% favored and 40% opposed military airstrikes in response to the government’s alleged use of chemical weapons. Today, Republicans oppose airstrikes by an overwhelming 70% to 21% margin, with 51% saying they are strongly opposed. Opposition has grown among independents as well, with two-thirds (66%) now opposed, up from half (50%) last weekend. Today, 50% of independents strongly oppose airstrikes, compared with just 15% who are strongly in favor. Despite Obama’s efforts to raise support for military action, Democrats continue to oppose airstrikes. Currently, 53% of Democrats oppose military airstrikes against Syria while 35% support them; the margin is little changed from a week ago (29% favored, 48% opposed). The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted September 4-8, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,506 adults age 18 or older, including 755 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: Public Opinion Runs Against Syrian Airstrikes    Tuesday, September 03, 2013
President Obama faces an uphill battle in making the case for U.S. military action in Syria. By a 48% to 29% margin, more Americans oppose than support conducting military airstrikes against Syria in response to reports that the Syrian government used chemical weapons. The new national survey by the Pew Research Center finds that Obama has significant ground to make up in his own party. Just 29% of Democrats favor conducting airstrikes against Syria while 48% are opposed. Opinion among independents is similar (29% favor, 50% oppose). Republicans are more divided, with 35% favoring airstrikes and 40% opposed. The public has long been skeptical of U.S. involvement in Syria, but an April survey found more support than opposition to the idea of a U.S.-led military response if the use of chemical weapons was confirmed. The new survey finds both broad concern over the possible consequences of military action in Syria and little optimism it will be effective. Three-quarters (74%) believe that U.S. airstrikes in Syria are likely to create a backlash against the United States and its allies in the region and 61% think it would be likely to lead to a long-term U.S. military commitment there. Meanwhile, just 33% believe airstrikes are likely to be effective in discouraging the use of chemical weapons; roughly half (51%) think they are not likely to achieve this goal. However, most believe Assad is guilty of using chemical weapons; 53% say there is clear evidence that the Syrian government used them against civilians there while just 23% say there is no clear evidence of a chemical attack. While those who think the evidence is clear offer modestly more support for airstrikes, even here as many oppose as support U.S. military involvement (41% each). The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted August 29 - September 1, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,000 adults age 18 or older, including 500 cell phone interviews.

Kaiser Health Tracking Poll: August 2013    Wednesday, August 28, 2013
Public opinion on the health reform law remains largely unchanged this month, tilting somewhat more negative than positive with 42 percent of Americans holding an unfavorable view and 37 percent a favorable one, a division which has held relatively steady in the Kaiser Health Tracking Poll since February, driven mainly by partisan differences on the law. The August poll finds that a majority of Americans (57%) disapprove of the idea of cutting off government funding as a way to stop the law from being implemented.  The most commonly cited reason among those who oppose defunding is that “using the budget process to stop a law is not the way our government should work” (69%), followed by a belief that “without funding the law will be crippled and won’t work as planned” (56%), and a feeling that the law will be “a good thing for the country” (49%). Fewer (35%) say their main reason for opposing defunding efforts is that “we’ve heard enough about health reform and it’s time to move on to something else.” Kaiser has asked about “defunding” nine times since 2011 with disapproval of the idea consistently outweighing approval. The new poll also finds that the public’s most trusted sources of information about the ACA are not necessarily the ones they are most likely to be hearing from. Americans are most likely to say they would put “a lot” of trust in information from their doctor or nurse (44%), a local pharmacist (30%), and federal and state health agencies (34% and 33%, respectively). By contrast, the most common places where people say they’ve actually heard about the law are from the news media (81% have gotten information from this source, but only 8% say they would trust it “a lot”) and family and friends (49% have gotten information, but only 18% trust it “a lot.”). The next most common source is social networking sites like Facebook and Twitter. Twenty-three percent have heard something about the ACA from such a source in the last month, yet just 3 percent say they would trust information from social networking sources “a lot.” The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted August 13-18, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,503 adults age 18 or older, including 752 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: King’s Dream Remains an Elusive Goal; Many Americans See Racial Disparities    Thursday, August 22, 2013
Five decades after Martin Luther King’s historic “I Have a Dream” speech in Washington, D.C., a new survey by the Pew Research Center finds that fewer than half (45%) of all Americans say the country has made substantial progress toward racial equality and about the same share (49%) say that “a lot more” remains to be done. Blacks are much more downbeat than whites about the pace of progress toward a color-blind society. They are also more likely to say that blacks are treated less fairly than whites by police, the courts, public schools and other key community institutions. While these differences by race are large, significant minorities of whites agree that blacks receive unequal treatment when dealing with the criminal justice system. For example, seven-in-ten blacks and about a third of whites (37%) say blacks are treated less fairly in their dealings with the police. Similarly, about two-thirds of black respondents (68%) and a quarter of whites (27%) say blacks are not treated as fairly as whites in the courts. The survey also finds that large majorities of blacks (73%) and whites (81%) say the two races generally get along either “very well” or “pretty well.” Similarly, large majorities of Hispanics and whites say the same thing about relations between their groups (74% and 77%, respectively). A substantial majority of blacks (78%) and smaller share of Hispanics (61%) say their groups get along. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted August 1-11, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 2,231 adults age 18 or older, including 1,552 cell phone interviews.

Uninsured People With Preexisting Conditions Still Don’t Know If They’ll Buy Health Insurance    Tuesday, August 20, 2013
Many consumers who have been priced out of the U.S. health insurance system or denied coverage due to a preexisting condition will be able to get affordable coverage for the first time starting in 2014. But a new survey shows many of these consumers aren't lining up to buy health insurance. The survey shows that 68 percent of uninsured consumers with a preexisting condition aren't sure if they’ll buy insurance when the health insurance exchanges (marketplaces created by the federal healthcare reform law) open this fall. It’s not surprising that many of the people surveyed said they still don’t know what they plan to do or how the Affordable Care Act will affect them, says John Rother, president and CEO of the nonprofit advocacy group, National Coalition on Health Care. Consumers likely will be forced to get more informed in the coming months, he says, especially when the health exchanges start selling insurance in each state this fall. “People tend to get a lot more focused when they have to make a decision,” Rother says. Starting in October, Americans with preexisting conditions will for the first time be able to buy health insurance without paying extra, experts say. A preexisting condition is a medical condition or illness that existed before a consumer began shopping for health insurance. “You won’t be turned down because of cancer or any illness,” says Sally McCarty, a healthcare reform expert with the Center on Health Insurance Reforms at the Georgetown University Health Policy Institute. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted July 11-28, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 3,005 adults age 18 or older, including 1,502 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: Public Backs Cutoff of Military Aid to Egypt    Monday, August 19, 2013
With violence continuing to rage in Egypt, 51% of Americans say it is better for the United States to cut off military aid to Egypt to put pressure on the government. This is nearly double the percentage (26%) saying it is better to continue military aid to the government in order to maintain influence in Egypt. The new national survey by the Pew Research Center finds that half of the public (50%) says that Barack Obama has not been tough enough toward the Egyptian military in responding to the violence against anti-government protesters; just 6% say he has been too tough. However, a sizable minority volunteers that Obama’s response has been about right (12%) or offers no response (32%). While the public favors cutting off U.S. aid to the Egyptian government, the country’s military is widely seen as better leaders for Egypt than the Muslim Brotherhood: 45% say the military could provide better leadership compared with 11% who say the Muslim Brotherhood. Nearly one-in-five (19%) volunteer than neither side can better lead Egypt, while 25% say they don’t know. The violence and chaos in Egypt has not attracted much in the way of interest among the U.S. public. Just 22% say they are following news about violence in Egypt very closely, while another 29% are following events there fairly closely. About half of Americans (48%) say they are following news from Egypt not too closely or not at all closely. A Pew Research Center survey last month found that fewer Americans viewed events in Egypt as critical to U.S. interests than did so in February 2011 during the Arab Spring. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted August 15-18, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,000 adults age 18 or older, including 500 cell phone interviews.

Living to 120 and Beyond: Americans’ Views on Aging, Medical Advances and Radical Life Extension    Thursday, August 08, 2013
With falling birthrates and rising life expectancies, the U.S. population is rapidly aging. By 2050, according to U.S. Census Bureau projections, one-in-five Americans will be 65 or older, and at least 400,000 will be 100 or older.1 Some futurists think even more radical changes are coming, including medical treatments that could slow, stop or reverse the aging process and allow humans to remain healthy and productive to the age of 120 or more. The possibility that extraordinary life spans could become ordinary life spans no longer seems far-fetched. A recent issue of National Geographic magazine, for example, carried a picture of a baby on its cover with the headline: “This Baby Will Live To Be 120.” Yet many Americans do not look happily on the prospect of living much longer lives. They see peril as well as promise in biomedical advances, and more think it would be a bad thing than a good thing for society if people lived decades longer than is possible today, according to a new survey by the Pew Research Center. Asked whether they, personally, would choose to undergo medical treatments to slow the aging process and live to be 120 or more, a majority of U.S. adults (56%) say “no.” But roughly two-thirds (68%) think that most other people would. And by similarly large margins, they expect that radically longer life spans would strain the country’s natural resources and be available only to the wealthy. There is, at present, no method of slowing the aging process and extending average life expectancies to 120 years or more. But research aimed at unlocking the secrets of aging is under way at universities and corporate labs, and religious leaders, bioethicists and philosophers have begun to think about the morality of radical life extension, according to two accompanying reports released by the Pew Research Center’s Religion & Public Life Project in conjunction with the new survey. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted March 21 - April 6, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 4,006 adults age 18 or older, including 2,004 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: Amid Criticism, Support for Media’s ‘Watchdog’ Role Stands Out    Thursday, August 08, 2013
Public evaluations of news organizations’ performance on key measures such as accuracy, fairness and independence remain mired near all-time lows. But there is a bright spot among these otherwise gloomy ratings: broad majorities More See Press Serving as Political Watchdogcontinue to say the press acts as a watchdog by preventing political leaders from doing things that should not be done, a view that is as widely held today as at any point over the past three decades. In the wake of revelations about government activities, including the NSA surveillance program and the IRS targeting of political groups, nearly seven-in-ten (68%) say press criticism of political leaders keeps them from doing things that should not be done, while just 21% say press criticism keeps leaders from doing their job. Support for the media’s watchdog role has risen 10 points since 2011 even as other press ratings have shown little sign of improvement.About equal majorities of Republicans (69%), independents (69%) and Democrats (67%) view news organizations as a check on political leaders and there has been a significant rise in this view across nearly all demographic and political groups. Young people especially have become more likely to say news organizations keep political leaders from doing things that should not be done, a shift in opinion that has taken place concurrently with rising concerns about civil liberties. Outside of its role as a watchdog, the press receives broadly negative ratings from the public on core performance measures. Two-thirds (67%) say that news reports are often inaccurate, and even greater percentages say that news organizations tend to favor one side (76%) and are often influenced by powerful people and organizations (75%). Ratings of news organizations have declined steadily since Pew Research first began tracking attitudes in 1985, and many current ratings stand near all-time lows reached in 2011. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted July 17-21, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,480 adults age 18 or older, including 730 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: Whither the GOP? Republicans Want Change, But Split over Party’s Direction    Wednesday, July 31, 2013
Coming off of two consecutive presidential election defeats, most Republican voters believe that their party must address major problems to be more competitive in the future. And roughly six-in-ten say improved messaging alone will not be enough – the GOP also needs to reconsider some of its positions. Yet while Republicans may agree on the scope of the problem, there is little consensus over the party’s future course on either policy or strategy. Move in a more conservative or moderate direction on policy? By 54% to 40%, Republican and Republican-leaning voters want the party’s leaders to move further to the right. Not surprisingly, conservatives and those who agree with the Tea Party overwhelmingly favor moving in a more conservative direction, while moderates and liberals would like to see the party take more centrist positions. Yet the more moderate wing of the party is a minority generally, and makes up an even smaller share of the likely primary electorate. Has the GOP compromised too much, or not enough? Republican voters are divided: 35% say the party has compromised too much with Democrats, 27% say not enough, while 32% say party leaders have handled this about right. On this tactical question the Tea Party stands apart: about half (53%) think party leaders have already compromised too much with Democrats, compared with just 22% of non-Tea Party Republicans. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted July 17-21, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,480 adults age 18 or older, including 730 cell phone interviews.

Bankrate July 2013 Financial Security Index    Monday, July 29, 2013
Bankrate's monthly survey of six questions measures how secure Americans feel about their personal finances compared to 12 months ago. The results of Bankrate's Financial Security Index have a margin of error of plus or minus 3.6 percentage points. This month, the index decreased to 102, down 0.7 points since June 2013. Respondents making six figures prefer stocks (34%) and real estate (32%). People making less than that prefer cash investments (29%), real estate (23%) and precious metals (18%). Cash investments were preferred by 32% of people with a high school education or less, compared to 24% of those with some college education and 19% with a college degree. Women prefer cash investments slightly more than men do (30% versus 21%), while men prefer stocks more than women do (18% versus 11%). Around 1 in 4 men (26%) are feeling more job-secure today, compared to 1 in 6 women (16%). 22% of Republicans, 17% of Independents and only 3% of Democrats say their job security has decreased in the past 12 months. More than one-third of those 65 and older (37%) feel less secure in their jobs, versus an average of 12% of adults in younger age groups. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted July 3-7, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,005 adults age 18 or older, including 502 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: Widening Regional Divide over Abortion Laws    Monday, July 29, 2013
While the balance of opinion toward abortion nationwide has remained largely steady over the past 20 years, there are widening disparities in public attitudes on the issue across different regions of the country.Opposition to legal abortion is highest in parts of the South – including Texas, which recently passed sweeping new abortion restrictions. The South Central region is the only one in which opposition to legal abortion has significantly increased since the mid-1990s. By contrast, support for legal abortion remains highest in New England – and the gap between New England and South Central states has widened considerably over the past two decades. The new national survey by the Pew Research Center finds that just over half of all Americans (54%) say that abortion should be legal in all or most cases. Fewer (40%) say it should be illegal in all or most cases. At the national level, public views on abortion have changed little over the last few years, and the balance of opinion has remained largely consistent for most of the past two decades. This month Texas joined 12 other states, mainly in the South and Midwest, that have banned abortions at no later than 22 weeks of pregnancy. (The new Texas law bans abortions at 20 weeks. Some of these other laws are temporarily blocked by court injunction.) In polling conducted in 2012 and 2013, about half (49%) of the residents of these 13 states believe abortion should be illegal in all or most cases. By comparison, in the other 37 states and the District of Columbia, just 36% agree, while 58% say abortion should be legal in all or most cases. These differences reflect a broader regional divide. New England residents are most likely to favor legalized abortion. Fully 75% say abortion should be legal in all or most cases, while 20% say abortions should be illegal in all or most cases. Roughly two-thirds (65%) in the Pacific Coast region, and solid majorities in the Mid-Atlantic (61%) and Mountain West (59%) also favor legal abortion. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted July 17-21, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,480 adults age 18 or older, including 730 cell phone interviews.

Government Surveillance: A Question Wording Experiment by Pew    Friday, July 26, 2013
In the wake of leaked information about the government’s telephone and digital surveillance programs last month, public opinion surveys reported a wide range of reactions. For example, a Pew Research Center/Washington Post survey conducted immediately after the revelations found broad support for the program, while a Gallup survey conducted just days later found more disapproval than approval. These, along with a number of other surveys during that period, all made an effort to describe the program as accurately and neutrally as possible, yet different question wording clearly produced different responses. To better understand how the manner in which the government’s surveillance program is described affects public evaluations, the Pew Research Center conducted a question wording experiment in a national telephone survey fielded between July 11 and 21, 2013 among 2,002 adults. The survey respondents were asked whether they would favor or oppose a government data collection program, but the wording of four elements of the program were described differently to different groups of respondents. These are: whether metadata or content is being collected; whether phone calls or emails are being monitored; whether the program has court approval; and whether the program is part of anti-terrorism efforts. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted July 22-21, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 2,002 adults age 18 or older, including 1,002 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: Few See Adequate Limits on NSA Surveillance Program    Friday, July 26, 2013
A majority of Americans – 56% – say that federal courts fail to provide adequate limits on the telephone and internet data the government is collecting as part of its anti-terrorism efforts. An even larger percentage (70%) believes that the government uses this data for purposes other than investigating terrorism. And despite the insistence by the president and other senior officials that only “metadata,” such as phone numbers and email addresses, is being collected, 63% think the government is also gathering information about the content of communications – with 27% believing the government has listened to or read their phone calls and emails. Nonetheless, the public’s bottom line on government anti-terrorism surveillance is narrowly positive. The national survey by the Pew Research Center finds that 50% approve of the government’s collection of telephone and internet data as part of anti-terrorism efforts, while 44% disapprove. These views are little changed from a month ago, when 48% approved and 47% disapproved. The divisions in public opinion about the government’s data-collection program were mirrored in a congressional vote this week on the issue. On July 24, the House of Representatives narrowly defeated an amendment to scale back the NSA’s telephone data collection. Nationwide, there is more support for the government’s data-collection program among Democrats (57% approve) than among Republicans (44%), but both parties face significant internal divisions: 36% of Democrats disapprove of the program as do 50% of Republicans. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted July 17-21, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,480 adults age 18 or older, including 730 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: Supreme Court’s Favorability Edges Below 50%    Wednesday, July 24, 2013
The Supreme Court’s favorability rating has edged below 50% for the first time in nearly three decades of Pew Research Center polling. Currently, 48% have a favorable opinion of the court while 38% have an unfavorable opinion. In March, before the court’s end-of-term decisions on same-sex marriage and the Voting Rights Act, 52% had a favorable impression of the Supreme Court while 31% had an unfavorable opinion. The national survey by the Pew Research Center, finds that African Americans’ views of the court have become much more negative in the aftermath of the court’s decisions. In March, 61% of blacks viewed the court favorably while 24% had an unfavorable opinion. Blacks View Supreme Court Much Less Favorably. Today, their opinions are divided (44% favorable vs. 41% unfavorable). This is among the lowest favorable ratings for the Supreme Court among blacks in polling dating to 1985. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted July 17-21, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,480 adults age 18 or older, including 730 cell phone interviews.


Most Americans Don’t Want Congress to Repeal Obamacare    Tuesday, July 23, 2013
Americans aren’t ready to repeal Obamacare. But that doesn’t mean they think its implementation is going well. A majority of adults don’t want to repeal the Affordable Care Act, according to the latest United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection Poll, preferring instead to either spend more on its implementation or wait to see if changes are needed later. But based on recent news that the White House is delaying its employer health insurance mandate, the public appears convinced that the law’s implementation is going poorly. A majority of Americans say the one-year delay is a sign the White House is ill-prepared for a law already facing mounting problems; only slightly more than one-third of adults say putting off the requirement shows the president wants to make sure implementation goes smoothly. The results are a mixed bag for Republicans, who argue that the law’s potentially messy effects will revive it as a political force in next year’s midterm elections. At a minimum, the results show voters are skeptical that the process, which even many supporters acknowledge is fraught with risk, is going well. That doesn’t necessarily mean Affordable Care Act will be at the front of their minds in 2014, but it does reveal widespread pessimism about the White House’s handling of it. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted July 18-21, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,000 adults age 18 or older, including 500 cell phone interviews.


Pew Poll: Many Say Economic Recovery Is Still a Long Way Off    Tuesday, July 23, 2013
Four years after the recession officially ended, the economic recovery remains a long way off in the view of many Americans. A new survey by the Pew Research Center finds that 44% say it will be a long time before the nation’s economy recovers. Smaller percentages say either the economy already is recovering (28%) or will recover soon (26%). These opinions are little changed from March. But last October, shortly before the presidential election, fewer Americans (36%) said it would be a long time before the economy recovers. At that time, 61% said the economy was already recovering or would recover soon; today 54% say this. Opinions of current economic conditions, which had improved modestly in June, have slipped back to levels from earlier this year. Currently, 17% say economic conditions are excellent or good, while 82% rate them as only fair or poor. In June, 23% rated the economy as excellent or good, the most positive measure in more than five years. The survey finds that Barack Obama’s overall job rating, which was more positive than negative in both May and June, is now evenly divided: 46% approve of his job performance while 46% disapprove. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted July 17-21, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,480 adults age 18 or older, including 730 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: Big Racial Divide over Zimmerman Verdict    Monday, July 22, 2013
The public is divided over the not guilty verdict in the George Zimmerman trial and over the conversation about race that has surrounded it. The latest national survey by the Pew Research Center finds roughly as many satisfied with the verdict in the case 1 (39%) as dissatisfied (42%), with nearly one-in-five (19%) offering no opinion. More broadly, 52% say race is getting more attention in this case than it deserves, while 36% say the case raises important issues about race that need to be discussed. African Americans express a clear and strong reaction to the case and its meaning: By an 86% to 5% margin, blacks are dissatisfied with Zimmerman’s acquittal in the death of Trayvon Martin. And nearly eight-in-ten blacks (78%) say the case raises important issues about race that need to be discussed. Among whites, more are satisfied (49%) than dissatisfied (30%) with the outcome of the Zimmerman trial. Just 28% of whites say the case raises important issues about race, while twice as many (60%) say the issue of race is getting more attention than it deserves. Not only do reactions to the outcome of the case vary widely across racial lines, but overall interest levels also are very different. When asked, in a separate survey, what recent news story they are talking about with friends and family, 63% of blacks volunteer the Zimmerman trial compared with 42% of whites. Nearly six-in-ten African Americans (58%) say they followed news about the verdict and reactions to the case very closely compared with 34% of whites. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted July 17-21, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,480 adults age 18 or older, including 730 cell phone interviews.

Public Religion Research Institute 2013 Economic Values Survey    Friday, July 19, 2013
The top four most important economic issues cited by Americans today are the lack of jobs (26%), the budget deficit (17%), the rising cost of health care (18%), and the increasing gap between the rich and poor (15%). About 1-in-10 say that social security (9%) or the rising costs of education (9%) is the country’s most important economic problem. While roughly one-quarter of Republicans (26%) and Democrats (25%) say the lack of jobs is America’s most important economic problem, Republicans and Democrats strongly differ in their views of the importance of the budget deficit (31% vs. 7% most important) and the increasing gap between the rich and the poor (6% vs. 21% most important). Americans are generally pessimistic about upward economic mobility. Nearly half (47%) of Americans believe that their generation is worse off financially than their parents’ generation, compared to 16% who believe their generation is doing about the same, and 36% who believe they are better off than their parents’ generation. The Silent Generation (ages 66-88) is the only generation in which a majority (59%) believe they are better off than their parents’ generation. Only one-quarter (26%) of the Silent Generation believe their generation is worse off than their parents’ generation. Baby Boomers (ages 49-67) are divided (45% worse off vs. 40% better off). Majorities of younger Americans in Generation X (ages 34-48) (51%) and Millennials (ages 18-33) (58%) believe they are worse off than their parents’ generation. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted May 30 - June 16, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 2,002 adults age 18 or older, including 800 cell phone interviews.


Americans Support the Keystone XL Pipeline by Wide Margin    Thursday, July 18, 2013
While the Obama administration mulls whether to approve the controversial Keystone XL pipeline, Americans are already decided. They support the project by a wide margin, prioritizing potential economic benefits over possible environmental consequences. The latest United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection Poll finds that more than two-thirds of respondents, 67 percent, support building the pipeline to carry Canadian oil to refineries on the U.S. Gulf Coast; that includes 56 percent of Democrats. Less than a quarter of Americans, 24 percent, oppose the project, the poll shows. The State Department is evaluating the proposal, and President Obama said last month that the pipeline should not be permitted if it leads to a significant increase in greenhouse-gas emissions. There is no timeline for a decision, but the State Department says it is evaluating the project in "a rigorous, transparent, and efficient manner." In the question posed by interviewers, poll respondents were told that Keystone supporters "say it will ease America's dependence on Mideast oil and create jobs," while opponents "fear the environmental impact" of building the pipeline. Specific environmental impacts, such as emissions and the risk of spills, were not enumerated as part of the question. Congressional Republicans have been prodding the administration to approve Keystone, with the GOP House holding a symbolic vote in support of the pipeline in May. (That measure won unanimous support from Republicans, save for one member who voted "present," while 19 Democrats also voted in favor.)The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted July 11-14, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,002 adults age 18 or older, including 500 cell phone interviews.


Americans Want Congress to Pass the Senate Immigration Bill    Thursday, July 18, 2013
Momentum for a major immigration overhaul has stalled in the House, as Republican leaders there have declared the Senate’s 1,200-page bill dead on arrival. But backers of the Senate’s framework—a combination of beefed-up border security and a path to citizenship for those already here illegally—have one key advantage going forward: broad public support. A strong majority of Americans, 59 percent, said they would like to see the House either pass the Senate’s immigration bill as is or pass a version with even tougher border-control measures, according to the latest United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection Poll. In contrast, only one in five voters said they prefer that the House pass no immigration legislation at all, and only 13 percent said they want the House to strip the path to citizenship from the Senate’s bill. In the survey, respondents were given four options for how the House should proceed on immigration. The two most popular answers were to pass the Senate bill with tougher border-enforcement provisions (30 percent) and to pass the Senate measure as is (29 percent). House Speaker John Boehner has ruled out the latter option, and his conservative Republican Conference has expressed little interest in any package with a path to citizenship for the millions of people now living in the country illegally.The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted July 11-14, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,002 adults age 18 or older, including 500 cell phone interviews.


Americans Want Nothing to Do With Egypt    Thursday, July 18, 2013
Americans have reached a near-unanimous verdict about what the United States should do with Egypt: Stay away. A strong majority of U.S. adults think America should steer clear of Egypt after the military deposed President Mohamed Morsi, according to a United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection Poll. Most people are unsure if the Middle Eastern nation is a friend or foe, the survey found, an ambiguity that at least partially explains why Americans are reluctant to help the country as it writhes with violence. Even measures that fall well short of direct involvement, like offering greater financial assistance, fail to garner even meager support. The findings are a warning to President Obama, should he consider stepping up the country’s involvement there. And it’s yet another reminder that after a decade-plus of wars, the American public remains deeply skeptical of any involvement, economically or militarily, abroad. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted July 11-14, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,002 adults age 18 or older, including 500 cell phone interviews.


Pew Poll: Modest Public Interest in Close of Zimmerman Trial    Thursday, July 18, 2013
The final days of the trial of George Zimmerman, which concluded July 13 with a verdict of not guilty, attracted relatively modest public interest overall. In a weekend survey, 26% say they were following news about the trial very closely. This is lower than interest in the initial controversy over Trayvon Martin’s shooting when it erupted last year. In March 2012, 35% said they followed news about Martin’s shooting very closely. However, the story has consistently attracted far more interest among blacks than whites – and that remained the case in the trial’s final days. Blacks are more than twice as likely as whites to say they tracked news about the Zimmerman trial very closely (56% vs. 20%). Moreover, fully 67% of blacks say they watched at least some live coverage of the Zimmerman trial, compared with 38% of whites. About one-in-five blacks (21%) say they watched “almost all" of the trial coverage; just 5% of whites reported watching almost all of it. The Pew Research Center survey was conducted. In 237 interviews conducted July 147-15-2013 1, the day after the Zimmerman verdict, 29% say they were following news about the trial very closely. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted July 11-14, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,002 adults age 18 or older, including 500 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: Public Divided over Same-Sex Marriage Rulings    Tuesday, July 02, 2013
The public is divided over last week’s Supreme Court rulings on same-sex marriage: 45% approve of the court’s decisions, while 40% disapprove. The latest national survey by the Pew Research Center finds that most Americans are aware of the ruling and its implications. Two-thirds (66%) know that the court ruled in favor of same-sex marriage supporters, while about the same share (67%) knows that it is up to individual states to determine whether gay couples can get married. By contrast, there is far less awareness of another major Supreme Court decision last week. Just 34% know that the court overturned parts of the Voting Rights Act; 23% say incorrectly it kept the law intact and 43% have no opinion. Opinions about the court’s decision in the case also reflect some confusion: A plurality (43%) has no opinion on the ruling, while 33% approve and 25% disapprove. Reactions to the court’s rulings on same-sex marriage are divided along age, gender and partisan lines. By about two-to-one (58% to 27%), those younger than 30 approve of the court’s decisions. People 65 and older disapprove of the rulings by 49% to 36%. Overall, 61% of Democrats approve of the Supreme Court rulings on gay marriage, while 63% of Republicans disapprove of them. And women (50% approve) are more supportive of the court’s actions than are men (39%). The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted June 27-30, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,003 adults age 18 or older, including 503 cell phone interviews.

Support for gay marriage hits high after ruling    Monday, July 01, 2013
A record majority of Americans approve of same-sex marriage in the wake of two landmark Supreme Court decisions, a USA TODAY poll finds. But the high court's rulings that struck down provisions of the Voting Rights Act and tightened the rules on affirmative action aren't in sync with the public's views. Overall, views of the court soured after a term that ended last week with high-profile decisions over who can marry, how college admissions are judged and whether the nation is ready to move on from some civil rights protections on voting. The court's decisions that opened the door to gay marriage in California and struck down a law that barred federal benefits for same-sex couples may well have boosted support in a country that was already moving in favor of same-sex marriage. "Neither one of those decisions is as a legal matter a huge gay rights victory," says Tom Goldstein, a Harvard Law School professor and publisher of SCOTUSblog, which analyzes the high court. "But it's the moral message from the court that these unions are entitled to equal respect ... that is probably the lasting legacy of the decisions and is probably going to play a significant role in public opinion." The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted June 27-30, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,003 adults age 18 or older, including 503 cell phone interviews.


Americans (Narrowly) Support 20-Week Abortion Ban    Thursday, June 27, 2013
Texas state Sen. Wendy Davis galvanized abortion-rights supporters--and even the White House--with a dramatic filibuster of a bill that would have outlawed all abortions after 20 weeks. But the latest United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection Poll shows that a plurality of Americans supports a ban on late abortions. Americans favor such a bill by 48 percent to 44 percent. Support was greatest among Republicans, 59 percent in support, but 53 percent of Americans not affiliated with either major party sided with the GOP. A majority of Democrats, 59 percent, were opposed while only 33 percent were in favor. The results come a day after Davis, the state senator, captured the imagination of liberals nationwide as she stood for 11 hours to block a Texas measure that would have banned abortions after 20 weeks and placed new restrictions on abortion clinics. In Washington, Democrats have lampooned House Republicans for passing a similar ban on abortions after the 20th week of pregnancy as the latest shot fired in the “war on women.”  But the poll, notably, showed that women supported such a measure in greater numbers than men (50 percent of women in favor; 46 percent of men). Overall, the survey suggests that the 20-week abortion measure fractures some of the modern Democratic coalition. Among all age groups, it was young Americans--who have regularly sided with Democratic priorities in the age of Obama--who most strongly supported the measure (52 percent). The measure also received the support of 51 percent of white women, both those who are college educated and those who are not. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted June 20-23, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,005 adults age 18 or older, including 504 cell phone interviews.


Americans Oppose 'Obamacare,' Social Security for Illegal Immigrants Made Legal by Reform    Thursday, June 27, 2013
As eight senators huddled behind closed doors to craft a bipartisan and comprehensive immigration-reform bill, South Carolinians began seeing television ads bashing Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham for his involvement. "Who elected Graham to demand amnesty and welfare for millions of illegal aliens?" a faceless voice asked in the February ad paid for by advocacy group NumbersUSA. Who would get welfare and other benefits under immigration reform is a complicated and still-unanswered question, with Congress far from done debating immigration legislation. But what Americans think of the idea is suddenly much clearer. According to the latest United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection Poll, more than two-thirds of all Americans and nine out of every 10 Republicans oppose making legalized immigrants "eligible for government benefits ... before they become citizens," confirming the issue's potency as one of the main political attacks against immigration reform supporters in 2014. NumbersUSA’s February ad against Graham may have been an early shot, but given how strongly the message tests, it seems sure to crop up again -- assuming attention remains focused on the issue.Overall, 77 percent of respondents opposed making government benefits available to legalized (but noncitizen) immigrants. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted June 20-23, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,005 adults age 18 or older, including 504 cell phone interviews.


Debt Stress Derails Vacation Plans    Thursday, June 27, 2013
The survey by CreditCardGuide.com found that 30 percent of Americans — and 47 percent of those who count credit card debt as their biggest worry — said they put off taking a vacation in the past year. A few even put off major life events, such as getting married or having a baby. “Consumers are feeling more stressed out and boxed in,” says Charles Green, a professor of finance at Seminole State College of Florida, who also runs a personal finance site, MyMoneyUniversity.com. “Many no longer have the ability to achieve what is known as the American Dream.” It's no surprise that vacations are the first item those harried consumers cut. “Vacations are not a necessity,” Green says. Shelving vacation plans is common in our stressed-out, overworked culture, even before you add debt to the mix, experts say. “America is the most hardworking nation on earth,” says William Bailey, associate professor of personal finance at the University of Arkansas, adding that American workers put in more hours than those in any other country, including Japan. Also, vacations are short-term plans that typically are paid for either with discretionary income or by going deeper into debt. Many consumers don't have much extra money right now, so Bailey says it's not surprising that many people who are in debt don't want to add more to their tab. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted June 6-9, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,004 adults age 18 or older, including 503 cell phone interviews.

2013 Public Affairs Pulse Survey    Tuesday, June 25, 2013
A majority of Americans lack faith in the federal government’s ability to solve the nation’s most pressing problems, and they’re looking to business for help, according to the 2013 Public Affairs Pulse survey. This national survey shows that three in five Americans (60%) have a very favorable or somewhat favorable view of major companies, while only 41 percent have a favorable view of the federal government. Nearly half of the public (51%) finds the federal government often wasteful and inefficient, and only 37 percent of Americans express a lot or some trust and confidence in the government’s ability to fix the country’s issues. Consequently, a majority of Americans think major companies should take on more responsibility to help solve problems that have traditionally been the responsibility of government, such as providing community services like food banks (70%), improving the quality of education (64%) and improving the quality and affordability of health care (62%). Results also show a slight uptick in negative views about regulation, with 52 percent of Americans believing that government regulation of business usually does more harm than good, while 44 percent believe it is necessary to protect the public interest. For the first time, the Pulse survey explored how levels of trust in various industry sectors might relate to perceptions of the need for more regulation of those sectors. And it found that, in general, the less trustworthy the public perceives an industry to be, the more likely the public is to say there is too little regulation of that industry. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted May 8-23, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,604 adults age 18 or older, including 801 cell phone interviews.


June 2013 Financial Security Index charts    Tuesday, June 25, 2013
Bankrate's monthly survey of six questions measures how secure Americans feel about their personal finances compared to 12 months ago. From June 6-9, 2013, telephone interviews (on landlines and cellphones) with 1,004 adults living in the continental U.S. were conducted by Princeton Survey Research Associates International. The results of Bankrate's Financial Security Index have a margin of error of plus or minus 3.7 percentage points. This month, the index increased to 102.7, up 2.5 points since May 2013. Some highlights: 55% of women and 45% of men have less than three months' worth of emergency savings; 40% of women and 49% of men have at least that much.38% of those ages 18-29; 44% of those ages 30-49; 44% of those ages 50-64; and 54% of those ages 65 and older have at least three months' of emergency savings. 72% of those making more than $75,000 had at least three months' of emergency savings, compared to 35% of those making less than that. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted June 6-9, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,004 adults age 18 or older, including 501 cell phone interviews.


Pew Poll: Final Court Rulings: Public Equally Interested in Voting Rights, Gay Marriage    Tuesday, June 25, 2013
A new poll finds that the public is as interested in the Supreme Court’s upcoming ruling on the Voting Rights Act as in its long-awaited decisions on same-sex marriage. Roughly a third of Americans (35% each) say they are very interested in both how the court will rule on whether parts of the Voting Rights Act are still necessary and on federal and state laws on gay marriage. A third (33%) express little or no interest in how the court rules on the Voting Rights Act, while 40% say they are not too or not at all interested in the court’s rulings on gay marriage. The Pew Research Center survey was conducted before the Supreme Court’s ruling Monday on affirmative action in college admissions. About three-in-ten (31%) had said they were very interested in that decision. There are wide racial differences in interest in all three court rulings. More whites than blacks say they are very interested in the same-sex marriage decisions (37% vs. 23%). Blacks express much more interest than whites in both the voting rights and affirmative action decisions. Blacks, in particular, express a great deal of interest in both the voting rights and affirmative action decisions (56% each). About a third (32%) of whites say they are very interested in the voting rights ruling while 25% are very interested in the affirmative action ruling. There are no partisan differences in interest in the court’s upcoming decisions on same-sex marriage: 39% of Republicans and 38% of Democrats are very interested, as are 34% of independents. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted June 20-23, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,005 adults age 18 or older, including 504 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: ‘Borders First’ a Dividing Line in Immigration Debate    Monday, June 24, 2013
As the Senate works toward a compromise on immigration reform, the emerging proposal addresses two widely-held public goals. Broad majorities – across party lines – continue to support a path to legalization for undocumented immigrants. And large majorities also say this legislation must include increased border security. But the public is divided on an issue that has been among the most contentious in Congress – whether border security must be achieved before the process of legalization can go forward. The national survey by the Pew Research Center and USA TODAY finds that 43% say that people in the U.S. illegally should be allowed to seek legal status only after effective border control is established, while 49% say this can occur while border security improvements are being made. Republicans and Democrats are on opposite sides of this issue: 60% of Democrats say border improvements and applications for legal status can happen at the same time, while a majority of Republicans (56%) say the borders must effectively be controlled first. Yet there also are substantial differences within both partisan bases. Republicans who agree with the Tea Party favor a “border security first” approach by more than two-to-one (67% to 27%). Non-Tea Party Republicans are divided (47%-47%). The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted June 12-16, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,512 adults age 18 or older, including 754 cell phone interviews.


Pew Poll: Obama Job Approval Holds Steady, Economic Views Improve    Thursday, June 20, 2013
In a second term marked by a series of controversies and little legislative success, President Obama’s job approval rating has nonetheless remained fairly steady. Currently, 49% approve of the way Obama is handling his job as president while 43% disapprove. That is little changed from a month ago, before the NSA surveillance controversy and the revelations that the IRS targeted conservative groups for extra scrutiny. In early May, 51% approved of Obama’s job performance while 43% disapproved. In fact, Obama’s current job rating has stayed at about 50% all year. He began the year with a 52% job approval mark, which fell to 47% in March, when the public’s economic expectations took a sharp turn for the worse. The latest national survey by the Pew Research Center finds that Obama is likely benefitting from more positive perceptions of the national economy. The share of Americans saying the economy is in excellent or good shape has doubled over the past year, from 11% to 23%, and is the highest measure since January 2008. Looking ahead, more say the economy will be better (33%) than worse (19%) a year from now. That is a reversal of economic expectations since March, when more said economic conditions would be worse (32%) than better (25%) in a year. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted June 12-16, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,512 adults age 18 or older, including 754 cell phone interviews.


Americans Split on Linking Border Security and Citizenship in Immigration Reform    Wednesday, June 19, 2013
Most Americans say illegal immigrants should be allowed to remain in the country, but the public divides evenly on whether citizenship should be linked to stiff progress in securing the border, as many Senate Republicans are demanding, the latest United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection Poll has found. As the Senate floor debate on immigration reform intensifies, the survey found a broad agreement across racial, generational and party lines that “immigrants who are now living in the U.S. illegally” should be permitted to remain in the U.S. But the poll found Americans split almost evenly on three other critical questions: whether those immigrants here illegally should be allowed to seek full-scale citizenship, whether citizenship should be tied to progress along the border, and whether the border today is secure. On the most fundamental question of how to handle the estimated 11 million immigrants now in the U.S. illegally, just 25 percent of those surveyed said illegal immigrants “should not be allowed to stay in the country legally.” But the remainder divided over what form legalization should take. The largest group, 45 percent, said those here illegally  “should be able to apply for US citizenship,” the approach taken in the bipartisan “Gang of Eight” immigration reform bill now on the Senate floor. The remaining 22 percent said they should be allowed to seek “permanent residency” but not citizenship, as some House Republicans prefer. (The rest said they were undecided.) The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted June 13-16, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,004 adults age 18 or older, including 503 cell phone interviews.

Kaiser June 2013 Tracking Poll    Wednesday, June 19, 2013
At a time when there is uncertainty about how interested young adults will be in purchasing health coverage under the Affordable Care Act (ACA), and experts say their participation will be important to balancing insurance pools and holding down premiums, the June Kaiser Health Tracking Poll finds that a large majority of young adults say they want health insurance and believe it is worth the expense. More than seven in ten people ages 18 to 30 say having health insurance is "very important," and similar shares feel it is something they need and that it is worth the money, according to the new poll. Just a quarter of young adults feel they are healthy enough to go without insurance. While young adults are sometime described as viewing themselves as "young invincibles," the poll finds that many young adults worry about affording medical bills, particularly catastrophic health costs. A large majority of the public overall also says health insurance is something they want and value. Nearly nine in ten Americans (87%) say it is "very important" to them personally to have health insurance, with another 9 percent saying it is "somewhat important." Similarly, 88 percent say that "health insurance is something I need," while 11 percent feel they are healthy enough to go without it. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted June 4-9, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,505 adults age 18 or older, including 753 cell phone interviews.


Should U.S. or Local Authorities Judge Border's Security? Americans Divided    Wednesday, June 19, 2013
Fewer than half of Americans think the Homeland Security Department should be responsible for determining if the country’s borders are secure, according to the latest United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection Poll, indicating a small preference for a national agency over state and local government. Forty-three percent of adults said Homeland Security should decide whether America’s borders are secure, the survey found, while 38 percent said the authority should lie with state and local government. The findings split along familiar partisan and ideological lines: Democrats indicate a greater trust in the federal government, and Republicans show a stronger preference for local options. Only 13 percent of adults said Congress should be in charge. If Congress links a pathway to citizenship to a new heightened standard of border security as part of its immigration reform bill, respondents to the survey were asked which government agency should be responsible for determining if that standard had been met. Among those who thought linking the two objectives is a good idea, 49 percent thought the Department of Homeland Security should have the responsibility while 34 percent said state and local governments. But among those who said the dual goals should not be linked, more people picked local government to certify security at the border over the federal option, 42 percent to 39 percent. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted June 13-16, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,004 adults age 18 or older, including 503 cell phone interviews.


Pew Poll: Public Split over Impact of NSA Leak, But Most Want Snowden Prosecuted    Tuesday, June 18, 2013
The public is divided over whether the leak of classified information about NSA phone and internet surveillance serves the public interest. But a majority says that former government contractor Edward Snowden should be criminally prosecuted. The new national survey, conducted by the Pew Research Center and USA TODAY among finds that 44% think that the release of classified information about the NSA program harms the public interest, while 49% say it serves the public interest. However, 54% of the public – including identical majorities of Republicans and Democrats (59% each) – say the government should pursue a criminal case against the person responsible for leaking the classified information about the program. Young people, by 60% to 34%, think that the NSA leak serves the public interest. Americans 30 and older are divided (46% serves vs. 47% harms). And while those younger than 30 are divided over whether Snowden should be prosecuted, majorities in older age groups favor the government pursuing a criminal case against him. The survey finds that the public has a more positive opinion about the impact of the revelations of NSA communications surveillance on the public interest than it did about the release of a massive trove of classified material about U.S. diplomatic relations by the Wikileaks website two-and-half years ago. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted June 12-16, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,512 adults age 18 or older, including 754 cell phone interviews.


Pew Poll: Public Remains Opposed to Arming Syrian Rebels    Monday, June 17, 2013
Broad majorities continue to oppose the U.S. and its allies sending arms and military supplies to anti-government groups in Syria. Last Thursday’s announcement that the U.S. would aid the rebels has not increasedpublic support for action, and majorities of all partisan groups are opposed. Overall, 70% oppose the U.S. and its allies sending arms and military supplies to anti-government groups in Syria; just 20% favor this. Opinion is little changed from December of last year (24% favor) and support is down slightly from March, 2012 (29% favor). The latest national survey by the Pew Research Center finds a major factor in overall attitudes about Syria is the impression that the U.S. military is already stretched thin. About two-thirds (68%) say the U.S. is too overcommitted to get involved in another conflict, and just 27% disagree. The public also has questions about the opposition groups in Syria: 60% say that they may be no better than the current government. At the same time, the public does not reject a key argument for involvement in Syria: by a 53%-36% margin, most agree that it is important for the U.S. to support people who oppose authoritarian regimes. The public is divided over whether the U.S. has a moral obligation to do what it can to stop the violence in Syria: 49% agree, 46% disagree. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted June 12-16, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,512 adults age 18 or older, including 754 cell phone interviews.


Pew Poll: Sexual Assault in the Military Widely Seen as Important Issue, But No Agreement on Solution    Thursday, June 13, 2013
A substantial majority of Americans (81%) view sexual assault in the military as an extremely or very important issue. But the public does not believe the problem of sexual assault is a bigger problem in the military than outside it: Just 11% say it is more of a problem inside the military, 23% say it is more of a problem outside the military, while 63% say it is about the same. And while 40% say the reports of sexual assault in the military represent underlying problems with military culture, a majority (54%) says they represent individual acts of misconduct. The latest national survey by the Pew Research Center and The Washington Post finds that the public is evenly divided over whether the better way to handle the problem of sexual assault in the military is for Congress to make changes in military laws (45%) or for military leaders to address the problem internally (44%). By 57% to 32%, Republicans say it would better for military leaders to handle the problem internally. By about the same margin (58% to 33%), Democrats say it would be better for Congress to make changes in military law. About half of Americans (52%) have a great deal or fair amount of confidence that military leaders will make the right decisions when it comes to the problem of sexual assault in the military, but just 36% express at least a fair amount of confidence in Congress on this issue. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted June 6-9, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,004 adults age 18 or older, including 503 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: Majority Views NSA Phone Tracking as Acceptable Anti-terror Tactic    Monday, June 10, 2013
A majority of Americans – 56% – say the National Security Agency’s (NSA) program tracking the telephone records of millions of Americans is an acceptable way for the government to investigate terrorism, though a substantial minority – 41% – say it is unacceptable. And while the public is more evenly divided over the government’s monitoring of email and other online activities to prevent possible terrorism, these views are largely unchanged since 2002, shortly after the 9/11 terrorist attacks. The latest national survey by the Pew Research Center and The Washington Post, finds no indications that last week’s revelations of the government’s collection of phone records and internet data have altered fundamental public views about the tradeoff between investigating possible terrorism and protecting personal privacy. Currently 62% say it is more important for the federal government to investigate possible terrorist threats, even if that intrudes on personal privacy. Just 34% say it is more important for the government not to intrude on personal privacy, even if that limits its ability to investigate possible terrorist threats. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted June 6-9, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,004 adults age 18 or older, including 503 cell phone interviews.



Pew Poll: In Gay Marriage Debate, Both Supporters and Opponents See Legal Recognition as 'Inevitable'    Thursday, June 06, 2013
As support for gay marriage continues to increase, nearly three-quarters of Americans – 72% – say that legal recognition of same-sex marriage is “inevitable.” This includes 85% of gay marriage supporters, as well as 59% of its opponents. The national survey by the Pew Research Center, conducted May 1-5 among 1,504 adults, finds that support for same-sex marriage continues to grow: For the first time in Pew Research Center polling, just over half (51%) of Americans favor allowing gays and lesbians to marry legally. Yet the issue remains divisive, with 42% saying they oppose legalizing gay marriage. Opposition to gay marriage – and to societal acceptance of homosexuality more generally – is rooted in religious attitudes, such as the belief that engaging homosexual behavior is a sin. At the same time, more people today have gay or lesbian acquaintances, which is associated with acceptance of homosexuality and support for gay marriage. Nearly nine-in-ten Americans (87%) personally know someone who is gay or lesbian (up from 61% in 1993). About half (49%) say a close family member or one of their closest friends is gay or lesbian. About a quarter (23%) say they know a lot of people who are gay or lesbian, and 31% know a gay or lesbian person who is raising children. The link between these experiences and attitudes about homosexuality is strong. For example, roughly two-thirds (68%) of those who know a lot of people who are gay or lesbian favor gay marriage, compared with just 32% of those who don’t know anyone. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted May 1-5, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,005 adults age 18 or older, including 753 cell phone interviews.


Pew Poll: Four-in-Ten Households Led by 'Breadwinner' Moms    Thursday, May 30, 2013
A record 40% of all households with children under the age of 18 include mothers who are either the sole or primary source of income for the family, according to a new Pew Research Center analysis of data from the U.S. Census Bureau. The share was just 11% in 1960. These “breadwinner moms” are made up of two very different groups: 5.1 million (37%) are married mothers who have a higher income than their husbands, and 8.6 million (63%) are single mothers. The income gap between the two groups is quite large. The median total family income of married mothers who earn more than their husbands was nearly $80,000 in 2011, well above the national median of $57,100 for all families with children, and nearly four times the $23,000 median for families led by a single mother. The groups differ in other ways as well. Compared with all mothers with children under age 18, married mothers who out-earn their husbands are slightly older, disproportionally white and college educated. Single mothers, by contrast, are younger, more likely to be black or Hispanic, and less likely to have a college degree. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted April 25-28, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,003 adults age 18 or older, including 503 cell phone interviews.


Nick Gillespie Interviews Emily Ekins about May Reason-Rupe Poll Results    Wednesday, May 29, 2013
Follow this link to see Reason's Polling Director Emily Ekins speak with Nick Gillespie about the results of Reason-Rupe's May 2013 Poll.  For instance, when respondents learn that that future retirees are unlikely to receive back the amount of money they paid into Social Security, they become open to reforming an entitlement system whose trustees say is unsustainable in its current form. Fifty-four percent of Americans say Congress should cut spending from current levels and 62 percent say Congress should forget about gun control and move on to other issues. Social Security is widely popular, with 64 percent having a favorable view of the retirement portions of the program. But it's also widely misunderstood as an individual retirement account rather than a transfer payment financed by current tax dollars. A plurality - 45 percent of respondents - still dislike Obamacare and one in five Americans qualifies as libertarian based on responses to questions about the role of the government in social and economic affairs.


Pew Poll: Most Say Disaster Spending Does Not Require Offsetting Cuts    Wednesday, May 29, 2013
As Oklahoma recovers from severe damage caused by last week’s tornado, a majority of Americans (59%) say federal spending in response to natural disasters is emergency aid that does not need to be offset by cuts to other programs, while 29% say such spending must be offset by cuts to other programs. While there are partisan differences in opinions about how disaster aid should be treated, majorities of Democrats (69%), independents (57%) and Republicans (52%) say that federal spending in response to natural disasters does not require offsetting spending cuts elsewhere. The national survey by the Pew Research Center and the Washington Postfinds broad support across demographic groups for the view that federal spending in response to natural disasters is emergency aid and does not need to be offset by cuts to other programs. Comparable majorities of those living in the Northeast (62%), Midwest (58%), West (58%) and South (57%) all agree that federal spending in response to disasters is emergency aid. Among Republicans and Republican-leaning independents, those who agree with the Tea Party are divided: 49% say government disaster spending does not require offsetting cuts, 42% say that it does. By a 54%-30% margin, Republicans who do not agree with the Tea Party, or have no opinion of the movement, say emergency disaster spending does not require offsetting cuts. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted May 23-26, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,005 adults age 18 or older, including 504 cell phone interviews.


Teens, Social Media, and Privacy    Saturday, May 25, 2013
Fully 95% of those ages 12-17 use the internet. Eight in ten online teens use some kind of social media. Twitter is still not in the same league as Facebook, which attracts 77% of online teens. Still, 24% of online teens now use Twitter, a figure that is up from 16% in 2011 and 8% the first time we asked this question in late 2009. Teenagers’ use of Twitter now outpaces that of adults; just 16% of online adults are Twitter users, up slightly from the 12% who were using Twitter in 2011. The number of teens who say they “use a social networking site like Facebook” is still significantly higher than it is among adults; 81% of online teens say they use social networking sites such as Facebook, while 67% of all online adults use these sites. However, the gap is now only due to adults ages 50 and older. Online adults under age 50 are now just as likely as teens to use the sites (79% vs. 81%). While Facebook and Twitter are often grouped together as “social media sites” or “social networking sites,” our data have shown repeatedly that a small segment of teens and adults think of Twitter differently. When we ask a standalone question about Twitter use, there is consistently a group of users who say they are not users of social networking sites, but they do use Twitter. Looking more closely at the 24% of online teens who use Twitter, 3% say they do not use a social networking site like Facebook. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted July 26 - September 30 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 802 teenagers ages 12-17.


Pew Poll: Partisan Interest, Reactions to IRS and AP Controversies    Tuesday, May 21, 2013
So far, public interest in a trio of controversies connected to the Obama administration has been limited. Roughly a quarter (26%) of Americans say they are very closely following reports that the IRS targeted conservative groups. About the same number (25%) are tracking the Benghazi investigation very closely, and even fewer (16%) are very closely following news about the Justice Department subpoenaing phone records of AP journalists. The new survey by the Pew Research Center finds that 37% of Republicans are paying very close attention to the IRS story, compared with 21% of Democrats and 25% of independents. And the Benghazi investigation continues to draw much greater interest from Republicans (34% very closely) than Democrats (18%). A historical review of previous controversies involving White House or cabinet officials finds that these levels of public interest – and the partisan divide in attentiveness – are not necessarily new. Previous scandals – such as the Lewis “Scooter” Libby case during George W. Bush’s administration or the “Pardon-gate” scandal at the end of Bill Clinton’s second term – received similar levels of public attention, and were generally more interesting to those in the opposition party. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted May 16-19, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,002 adults age 18 or older, including 502 cell phone interviews.

Reason-Rupe May 2013 National Survey    Tuesday, May 21, 2013
President Barack Obama has vowed to keep pushing for new gun control measures and Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid said the failed gun vote in the Senate was “just the beginning.” However, the latest Reason-Rupe national poll finds just 33 percent of Americans feel the “Senate should debate and vote on gun control legislation again,” while 62 percent want the Senate to “move on to other issues.” Earlier this month the world’s first fully 3D-printed gun was successfully fired and Reason-Rupe finds Americans are torn on 3D technology.  A substantial 62 percent of Americans say people should be allowed to use 3D printers in their homes. Among those who say Americans should be allowed to have 3-D printers in their home, a majority (53 percent) say Americans should not be allowed to print their own gun parts, 44 percent say they should. When asked about the manhunt for the Boston Marathon bombers, 31 percent of Americans say it makes them more likely to want a gun in their homes, 9 percent are less likely to want a gun and 54 percent say their views weren’t impacted by the events. Almost half, 49 percent, of Americans fear the Boston bombings will cause the government to “overreact and enact policies that do more harm than good. ” Conversely, 42 percent trust the government to develop policies that help “avoid similar acts of terror.” The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted May 9-13, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,003 adults age 18 or older, including 503 cell phone interviews.


Pew Poll: Benghazi Investigation Does Not Reignite Broad Public Interest    Wednesday, May 15, 2013
The public paid limited attention to last week’s congressional hearings on Benghazi. Fewer than half (44%) of Americans say they are following the hearings very or fairly closely, virtually unchanged from late January when Hillary Clinton testified. Last October, 61% said they were following the early stages of the investigation at least fairly closely. The national survey by the Pew Research Center, conducted May 9-12 among 1,000 adults, finds that Americans are deeply split over how both the administration and congressional Republicans are handling the situation. Four-in-ten (40%) say the Obama administration has generally been dishonest when it comes to providing information about the Benghazi attack, but 37% say they have been generally honest. And when it comes to the GOP-led investigation, 36% say Republicans have gone too far in the hearings, while 34% say they have handled them appropriately. Not surprisingly, these reactions divide cleanly along partisan lines. Among Republicans, 70% say the Obama administration has been dishonest and 65% say the hearings have been handled appropriately. Among Democrats, 60% say the hearings have gone too far, and 62% say the administration has been honest. The judgment of independents leans against the administration at this point: By a 48% to 30% margin independents say the administration has been generally dishonest. But independents are split when it comes to Republican handling of the hearings. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted May 9-12, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,000 adults age 18 or older, including 500 cell phone interviews.


Pew Poll: After Boston, Little Change in Views of Islam and Violence    Monday, May 06, 2013
The public’s views of whether Islam is more likely than other religions to encourage violence have changed little in the aftermath of the Boston Marathon bombings. Currently, 42% say Islam is more likely than other religions to encourage violence among its believers, while 46% say Islam does not encourage violence more than other religions. These are similar to opinions about Islam and violence for most of the past decade. But in March 2002, six months after the 9/11 attacks, just 25% said Islam was more likely to encourage violence while 51% disagreed. The new national survey finds sizable demographic and religious differences in attitudes toward Islam and violence. And the partisan gap is as large as ever: 62% of Republicans say that Islam encourages violence more than other religions, compared with 39% of independents and just 29% of Democrats. The survey also finds that Muslim Americans are seen as facing more discrimination than some other groups in society, including gays and lesbians, Hispanic Americans, African Americans and women. Overall, 45% say that Muslim Americans face a lot of discrimination, and 28% say they are subject to some discrimination. Only about one-in-five say that Muslim Americans face only a little (13%) or no discrimination (6%). About four-in-ten (39%) say that gays and lesbians face a lot of discrimination. Smaller percentages say that Hispanic Americans (25%), African Americans (22%) and women (15%) face a lot of discrimination. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted May 1-5, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,504 adults age 18 or older, including 753 cell phone interviews.


Pew Poll: Division, Uncertainty over New Immigration Bill    Wednesday, May 01, 2013
As Congress debates a bill to overhaul the nation’s immigration policy, much of the public has yet to form an opinion about the legislation. About as many say they favor (33%) as oppose (28%) the immigration bill before Congress, but fully 38% say they don’t know what they think of the legislation. At this early stage of debate, the public does not think the bill would have a major impact on the nation’s economy or security. About half say either that the immigration bill would not make much of a difference for the economy (35%) or that they don’t know how the bill would affect the economy (17%). An even greater percentage says the bill would have no impact on the country’s safety from terrorism (57%) or that they don’t know how the country’s security would be affected (16%). The national survey by the Pew Research Center, conducted April 25-28 among 1,003 adults, finds that most do not think the Boston Marathon bombings should be an important factor in the debate over immigration legislation. Nearly six-in-ten (58%) say the Boston attack and the immigration debate are mostly separate issues, while 36% say the attack should be an important factor in the debate. Overall, the debate over immigration policy has drawn little public attention. Just 19% say they are following the story very closely. And most Americans are unaware of some of the legislation’s visible aspects. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted April 25-28, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,003 adults age 18 or older, including 503 cell phone interviews.


Kaiser April 2013 Tracking Poll     Tuesday, April 30, 2013
With open enrollment in new health coverage options created under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) set to begin in October, much of the public remains confused about the status of the law, according to the April Kaiser Health Tracking Poll, which provides a rough baseline of public awareness of the ACA before more intensive consumer information and consumer assistance efforts begin. Kaiser will track public awareness, including awareness among the uninsured, as implementation unfolds. Among the key findings of the new poll: Four in ten Americans (42%) are unaware that the ACA is still the law of the land, including 12 percent who believe the law has been repealed by Congress, 7 percent who believe it has been overturned by the Supreme Court and 23 percent who say they don’t know enough to say what the status of the law is. About half the public (49%) says they do not have enough information about the health reform law to understand how it will impact their own family. The share of the public that says they lack enough information to understand how the ACA will affect their family is higher among the two groups the law is likely to benefit most – the uninsured (58% of whom say they lack enough information) and low-income households (56%). The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted April 15-20, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,203 adults age 18 or older, including 602 cell phone interviews.

73% Don’t Know How Many Rewards Miles/Points They Have    Tuesday, April 23, 2013
According to a survey conducted on behalf of ThePointsGuy.com, a travel news and advice website, 73% of Americans who have frequent flyer miles or credit card rewards points don’t know how many they have. Younger people are the least likely to keep track of their miles and points: 80% of 18-29 year-olds who have points don’t know how many they have. Other findings include: 67% of Americans collect rewards miles/points, 41% of Americans understand how frequent flyer programs work, and 27% of Americans who have frequent flyer miles admit that they have let some or all of their miles expire at some point .The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted February 28 - March 3, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,003 adults age 18 or older, including 502 cell phone interviews.


Public support for gun control ebbs    Tuesday, April 23, 2013
Four months after the shooting rampage at Sandy Hook Elementary School, a USA TODAY Poll finds support for a new gun-control law ebbing as prospects for passage on Capitol Hill seem to fade. Americans are more narrowly divided on the issue than in recent months, and backing for a bill has slipped below 50%, the poll finds. By 49%-45%, those surveyed favor Congress passing a new gun-control law. In an NBC/Wall Street Journal poll in early April, 55% had backed a stricter gun law, which was down from 61% in February. Those who support a bill want advocates in Congress to hang tough and not compromise -- an attitude that also could complicate passing legislation. Sixty-one percent say members of Congress "should only agree to a stronger version of the bill, even if it might not pass." Just 30% say they should "accept a weaker law" they know can win approval. "So much of the support for gun control is emotional, following the Newtown tragedy," says Stuart Rothenberg, editor and publisher of the non-partisan Rothenberg Political Report. The December shooting at the Connecticut school left 20 children and six adults dead. "The longer you get away from there, people start thinking of other issues. They start thinking about terrorism or jobs or immigration, and not surprisingly, then some of the momentum behind gun control starts to fade." The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted April 18-21, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,002 adults age 18 or older, including 501 cell phone interviews.


Pew Quiz: Public's Knowledge of Science and Technology    Monday, April 22, 2013
The public’s knowledge of science and technology varies widely across a range of questions on current topics and basic scientific concepts, according to a new quiz by the Pew Research Center and Smithsonian magazine. About eight-in-ten Americans (83%) identify ultraviolet as the type of radiation that sunscreen protects against. Nearly as many (77%) know that the main concern about the overuse of antibiotics is that it can lead to antibiotic-resistant bacteria. However, only about half (51%) of the public knows that “fracking” is a process that extracts natural gas, not coal, diamonds or silicon from the earth. Similarly, knowledge of basic scientific concepts differs greatly across questions. While most Americans (78%) know that the basic function of red blood cells is to carry oxygen to all parts of the body, just 20% could identify nitrogen as the gas that makes up most of the atmosphere. The survey was conducted with Smithsonian magazine for an edition focusing on STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) education. The public underestimates how well American high school students perform on standardized science tests compared with students in other developed nations. A plurality (44%) believes that 15-year-olds in other developed nations outrank U.S. students in knowledge of science; according to an international student assessment, U.S. 15-year-olds are in the middle ranks of developed nations in science knowledge. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted March 7-10, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,006 adults age 18 or older, including 505 cell phone interviews.


Pew Poll: A Third of Americans Say They Like Doing Their Income Taxes    Thursday, April 11, 2013
As April 15 approaches, a majority of Americans (56%) have a negative reaction to doing their income taxes, with 26% saying they hate doing them. However, about a third (34%) say they either like (29%) or love (5%) doing their taxes. The national survey by the Pew Research Center, conducted April 4-7 among 1,003 adults, finds that the expectation of getting a refund is cited most often for why people like doing their taxes, but it is not the only factor. When asked why they like doing their income taxes, 29% say that they are getting a refund, while 17% say they just don’t mind it or they are good at it; 13% say doing their taxes gives them a sense of control, while the same percentage cites a feeling of obligation – that it is their duty to pay their fair share. Among those who dislike or hate doing their taxes, most cite the hassles of the process or the amount of time it takes: 31% say it is complicated, requires too much paperwork or they are afraid of making mistakes, while 24% say it is inconvenient and time-consuming. A much smaller share (12%) says they dislike doing their taxes because of how the government uses tax money. Just 5% of those who dislike or hate doing their income taxes say it is because they pay too much in taxes. Overall, people with lower incomes are more likely to have a positive of view of doing their taxes than those with higher incomes. About four-in-ten (41%) of those with family incomes of less than $30,000 a year say they like or love doing their income taxes compared with 30% of those with incomes of $75,000 or more. Blacks are far more likely than whites to say they like doing their taxes (52% vs. 28%). The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted March 4-7, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,003 adults age 18 or older, including 503 cell phone interviews.



Pew Poll: Public Divided over North Korea's Intentions, Capability    Tuesday, April 09, 2013
A majority of Americans say that the United States should take North Korea’s nuclear threats very seriously. At the same time, the public is divided over whether North Korea’s leadership is willing and capable of following through on its threats against the United States. The national survey by the Pew Research Center finds that 56% say the government should take North Korea’s threats to use nuclear missiles against the U.S. very seriously. Another 27% say the government should take North Korea’s threats somewhat seriously. About half of Americans (47%) think that North Korea’s leadership is really willing to follow through on its threats against the United States; 41% think North Korea is not really willing to follow through. Opinion also is divided about North Korea’s ability to make good on its threats: 47% say it is capable of launching a nuclear missile that could reach the U.S. while 43% say it is not capable. About a third of the public (36%) says they are paying very close attention to news about North Korea’s military threats and plans to restart its nuclear reactor, making this the most closely followed foreign news story of the year. Those who are following news about North Korea’s threats very closely are far more likely than those following it less closely to say that the government should take the threats very seriously (73% vs. 46%). The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted April 4-7, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,003 adults age 18 or older, including 500 cell phone interviews.


'Big gap to close' in public awareness of health law    Friday, April 05, 2013
Most consumers would flunk a test today on the federal Affordable Care Act, a new survey indicates, even though doing the wrong things could cost them bundles of money, add to their tax bills and affect the health care they and their families receive. But there's still enough time to learn how the law can help or hurt people so that they'll get a passing grade as important provisions of the law take effect later this year. “We have a big gap to close,” said Laura Adams, senior insurance analyst for InsuranceQuotes.com. Among findings made public Thursday, of those surveyed: 90 percent didn't know that the new health care marketplaces, also known as insurance exchanges, will open Oct. 1, one of the most important features of the new law. This is where individuals will compare and buy health insurance policies. Tens of millions of previously uninsured Americans are expected to gain access to health insurance. 49 percent knew that health plans will have to limit the amount that patients must pay for care each year, and 46 percent knew that plans won't limit yearly total benefits per person. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted March 7-10, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,006 adults age 18 or older, including 501 cell phone interviews.


Americans' Financial Security Surges, Most Consumers Unfazed by Higher Payroll Tax Rate    Monday, March 25, 2013
Bankrate's March Financial Security Index reading of 101.5 is the highest since the monthly polls began in December 2010. The 4.7-point jump from February's 96.8 is the second-biggest monthly gain in the Index's history (after a five-point gain from April 2011 to May 2011). This is only the third time in the past 28 months that consumers are feeling better about their financial security versus 12 months prior. Bankrate found that more than half of working Americans either haven't noticed (48%) or have been unaffected by (7%) the January 1 expiration of the payroll tax cut. Thirty percent of working Americans have cut their spending as a result. Eight percent are putting less money into savings and 3% have scaled back retirement contributions. "What is shocking is that the lowest-income households were the least likely to have cut back on spending and the most likely not to have noticed the change in the payroll tax," said Greg McBride , CFA, Bankrate.com's senior financial analyst. "These results contradict the widely held assumption that lower-income households would feel the biggest squeeze from the payroll tax cut expiring." Those most likely to have cut spending were households with income between $50,000 and $75,000 per year. The same surprising results were evident when evaluating on the basis of educational attainment: households headed by college graduates were the most likely to have cut spending, whereas households headed by those with less than a college degree were the most likely not to have noticed the higher payroll tax rate. Four of the Financial Security Index's five components (job security, debt, net worth and overall financial situation) indicate that Americans are better off now than one year ago; savings is the only laggard. All five components improved over the past month The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted March 7-10, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,006 adults age 18 or older, including 505 cell phone interviews.


Kaiser March 2013 Tracking Poll    Wednesday, March 20, 2013
As the Affordable Care Act (ACA) turns three this month, the law remains more of a political symbol than a reality for most Americans, including those the ACA is designed to benefit the most, the latest Kaiser Health Tracking Poll shows. Less than a year before the law takes full effect, 57 percent of Americans say they still do not have enough information to understand how it will affect them. The share rises to two-thirds among some of the key groups the law was designed to help: the uninsured (67%) and those with incomes below $40,000 (68%). The poll also finds that Americans’ awareness of key elements of the law has declined somewhat since passage when media attention was at its height. For example in April 2010, 64 percent of the public recognized that the law would prohibit insurance companies from denying coverage to people with pre-existing medical conditions. That number has fallen to 53 percent today. Similarly, in April 2010, 75 percent were aware of the law’s tax subsidies to help lower and moderate income Americans purchase coverage; today that figure is 62 percent. Awareness and enrollment efforts are now beginning to ramp up across the country, and the Foundation will continue to gauge awareness of the law among key groups in our tracking polls. The survey finds that the public is not tuned into decisions states are making today about whether to expand their Medicaid program under the law and how to establish the insurance exchange marketplaces. Just 7 percent of the public say they have heard “a lot” (and 15% have heard “some”) about their own state’s decision to set up an exchange or leave the task to the federal government. And 78 percent say they have not heard enough to say whether their governor has made a decision about whether to expand Medicaid under the ACA. This is true in states where the governor has announced that they will expand Medicaid (80% say they haven’t heard enough to say) as well as in states whose governor has said they will not move forward with the expansion (74%). The poll also found that more Americans say they favor expanding Medicaid in their state (52%) than say they oppose it (41%), and a large majority has a favorable view of the law’s health insurance exchanges (80%). The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted February 7-10, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,204 adults age 18 or older, including 6002 cell phone interviews.


Pew Poll: A Decade Later, Iraq War Divides the Public    Tuesday, March 19, 2013
A decade after the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq, the public offers a divided judgment of the war: 46% say the U.S. has mostly succeeded in achieving its goals in Iraq, about as many (43%) say it has mostly failed. The public also is split over the original decision to use military force in Iraq. While 44% say it was the wrong decision to use force in Iraq, 41% say it was the right decision. The national survey by the Pew Research Center, conducted March 14-17 among 924 adults, finds that the percentages saying the war was a success and the decision to go to war was the right one have declined since November 2011, as U.S. forces were being withdrawn from Iraq. At that time, 56% said the U.S. had mostly succeeded in Iraq, 10 points higher than today. Nearly half (48%) said the war was the right decision — among the highest percentages since the second year of the war. The decline in the percentage saying the war was the right decision has come largely among Republicans. Currently, 58% of Republicans say the war was the right decision, down 14 points since November 2011 and the lowest percentage since the war began in 2003. Opinions among Democrats and independents are little changed since 2011. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted March 14-17, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 924 adults age 18 or older, including 412 cell phone interviews.


Venn Diagrams, Probability 101 and Sampling Weights Computed for Dual Frame Telephone RDD Designs by Trent D. Buskirk, PH.D and Jonathan Best    Thursday, March 14, 2013

The continued rise in cell phone penetration creates a real potential for undercoverage bias in many RDD sample surveys. To respond to such threats researchers have begun implementing dual frame RDD sampling strategies. In this paper we present a method for constructing first-stage sampling weights derived under an overlapping, dual frame design (e.g. cell and landline RDD numbers) based on probability 101 fundamentals. Because these two frames potentially overlap at the user level, selection probabilities must be adjusted for multiplicity of selection. Our method resembles weighting strategies consistent with a "single frame" approach and does not require estimation of a compositing factor traditionally used in the "dual frame" approach. Estimators employing resulting sampling weights are effectively Horvitz-Thompson estimators that in some cases can be approximated using a slightly simplified Hansen-Hurwitz type estimator. We use our proposed method to construct base sampling weights for both a national and state level dual frame RDD samples of landline and cell phone numbers. Using national and state-level benchmark data we also present bias estimates for a battery of health related outcomes.



Pew Poll: Views of Economic News Remain Mixed    Tuesday, March 12, 2013
As federal spending cuts take effect and the stock market has reached record highs, the public continues to say they are hearing a mix of good and bad news about the economy. Overall, 58% say they have been hearing mixed economic news; a third (33%) have been hearing mostly bad news about the economy, while just 7% say they have been hearing mostly good news. Views of economic news are little changed in recent months. While the overall economic news picture remains mixed, a national survey by the Pew Research Center finds modest improvement in views of news about the financial markets. About a quarter (23%) say they are hearing mostly good news about markets, up from 18% in February. Nonetheless, more (29%) say they are hearing mostly bad news about financial markets; 43% report hearing mixed news. Meanwhile, impressions of news about gas prices have turned sharply negative. Nearly three-quarters (74%) say they have been hearing mostly bad news about gas prices, just 4% have been hearing mostly good news and 20% have heard mixed news. About a month ago, 53% said they had been hearing mostly bad news about gas prices. Negative impressions of news about gas prices have risen across nearly all demographic groups. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted March 7-10, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,006 adults age 18 or older, including 505 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: U.S. Catholics See Sex Abuse as the Church’s Most Important Problem, Charity as Its Most Important Contribution    Friday, March 08, 2013
As the Roman Catholic Church prepares for a conclave to elect a new pope, Catholics in the United States tend to view the scandal over sex abuse by clergy as the most important problem facing their church today. Asked to say in their own words what they think is the Catholic Church’s most important problem, 34% of U.S. Catholics mention sex abuse, pedophilia or some other reference to the scandal. No other problem garners more than 10% of responses. When asked about the main way the church helps society today, U.S. Catholics most commonly refer to charitable efforts to aid the poor, feed the hungry and heal the sick. In a nationwide Pew Research Center survey nearly one-in-ten U.S. Catholics (9%) say that the church faces a lack of credibility or trust. And 7% cite low attendance at Mass, a loss of followers or a general loss of faith in society as the most important problem facing the church at this time. An equal number (7%) say the church’s most important problem is that it is outdated or out of touch and needs to become more modern or adapt to changes in society. Just one-in-twenty U.S. Catholics (5%) mention the temporary lack of a pope or the need to choose a new pope as the church’s most important problem today. About one-in-six (17%) decline to offer an opinion or say they do not know what is the most important problem facing the church. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted February 28 to March 3, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,003 adults age 18 or older, including 184 Catholics.

Reason-Rupe February/March 2013 National Survey    Wednesday, March 06, 2013
A majority of Americans, 57 percent, believe it is unconstitutional for the president of the United States to order the killing of American citizens who are suspected of being terrorists, a new Reason-Rupe poll finds. Just 31 percent think it is constitutional for the president to order the killing of American citizens suspected of being terrorists. Even more, 59 percent, say they are concerned “the government may abuse its power” when it comes to using drone strikes on American citizens who are suspected of being terrorists. As the use of drones by domestic law enforcement agencies grows, 60 percent of Americans are now concerned that their local police departments might invade their privacy with the use of drones. The public is split, 47-47, on whether or not they “should have the right to destroy” a drone that is taking pictures or videos of their home. The Reason-Rupe poll conducted live interviews with 1,002 adults on mobile (502) and landline (500) phones from February 21-25, 2013. The poll’s margin of error is plus or minus 3.8 percent. Princeton Survey Research Associates International executed the nationwide survey. Nearly six in ten Americans say the country is headed in the wrong direction. But 51 percent approve of the job President Barack Obama is doing, 43 percent disapprove. The president’s handling of the economy gets lower marks: 47 percent approve, 49 percent disapprove. But nothing in the Reason-Rupe poll gets lower marks than Congress: 77 percent of Americans disapprove of the job Congress is doing, just 14 percent approve.  The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted February 21-25, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,002 adults age 18 or older, including 502 cell phone interviews.



Kaiser February 2013 Tracking Poll    Wednesday, February 27, 2013
With gun control re-emerging as a major political issue following the tragic mass shootings at an elementary school in Newtown, Conn., the latest Kaiser Health Tracking Survey measures the public’s personal experiences with, and worries about, gun violence. It finds that one in five Americans say they personally know a victim of gun violence. And considerably more — four in ten Americans (42%) — say they are at least somewhat worried about being the victim of gun violence. Among the twenty percent who know a victim, a majority say that person was a good friend, family member or even themself. Blacks stand out as the group most likely to know someone who suffered from gun violence (42%), followed by younger Americans (28% of those aged 18 to 29). When it comes to worrying about becoming a victim of gun violence, the poll finds members of racial or ethnic minority groups are particularly likely to report concern, with majorities of Hispanics (75%) and blacks (62%) saying they are worried, compared to 30 percent of whites. The poll also probed Americans’ experiences with and opinions about mental illness and mental health care following Newtown. It finds that three-quarters of Americans believe that individuals with severe mental health issues experience “a lot” or “some” discrimination, higher than the share who say the same about minorities, women and people with physical disabilities. Only immigrants were more likely to be perceived as experiencing discrimination, with 79 percent of the public saying immigrants faced “a lot” or “some” discrimination. The survey also finds that many people hold potentially stigmatizing attitudes about the mentally ill. Two-thirds of parents say they would not feel comfortable having “a person with a serious mental illness” work in their child’s school. Nearly half the public (47%) would feel at least somewhat uncomfortable living next door to such a person, and 41 percent would feel uncomfortable working alongside them. In terms of access to care, 8 percent of Americans say someone in their household has had problems getting needed mental health care, a proportion that rises to two in ten (20%) among those currently without health insurance. The most common barrier was cost, followed by insurance coverage issues and confusion over where to go. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted February 14-19, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,209 adults age 18 or older, including 607 cell phone interviews.


Pew Poll: Most Say Spending Cuts Would Have Major Impact on Economy, Military    Tuesday, February 26, 2013
While many Americans may be resigned to seeing automatic spending cuts in the budget sequester go into effect, the public is concerned about the potential impact of the reductions. A new national survey by the Pew Research Center and The Washington Post, conducted Feb. 21-24 among 1,000 adults, finds that most say the budget sequester would have a major effect on the economy as well as on the U.S. military. And by more than three-to-one (62%-18%), the public sees the impact on the economy as mostly negative rather than mostly positive. But signs of public fatigue after a series of fiscal crises remain apparent. Just days before automatic federal spending cuts are set to take place, only a quarter are following the issue very closely. By comparison, four-in-ten were closely tracking the fiscal cliff debate in December a full month before the deadline. And a Pew Research Center/USA TODAY survey just last week found 40% willing to see the sequester’s cuts take hold rather than having them delayed. Yet the new survey finds six-in-ten-ten (60%) saying automatic federal spending cuts would have a major effect on the U.S. economy and nearly as many (55%) say the same for the U.S. military. Fewer (45%) say the cuts would have a major impact on the federal budget deficit, while just (30%) think their own personal finances would be affected in a major way. And while earlier polls have found Republicans and Democrats offering different solutions to the nation’s budget problems, there is substantial partisan agreement that the sequester will do more economic harm than good. Roughly six-in-ten Republicans, Democrats and independents alike say the sequester will have a major effect on the nation’s economy, and by overwhelming margins all agree that the effect will be negative, not positive. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted February 21-24, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,000 adults age 18 or older, including 500 cell phone interviews.



One-fourth of adult drivers have gotten traffic tickets in past 5 years    Monday, February 25, 2013
It’s a familiar scenario for so many drivers: Just after getting a speeding ticket, you hang your head and begin worrying about your car insurance premiums going through the roof. But a new survey suggests that ticketed drivers may be worrying in vain. InsuranceQuotes.com asked American drivers over age 18 whether they’d received a traffic ticket in the past five years for infractions like speeding, running a red light or passing illegally. Of those polled, 23 percent had gotten traffic tickets. Among ticket recipients, only 31 percent said they’re paying more for car insurance as a result. This, experts say, is not entirely surprising. Car insurance premiums don’t always climb after someone gets slapped with a moving violation. When a car insurance company prepares a new policy, one of the things it checks is a driver’s motor vehicle report (MVR). This report includes a list of all traffic tickets the driver has received in the past two or three years as well as the number of points on that person’s driving record. It’s one of the primary tools used to determine premiums for new customers. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted January 31 - February 3, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,000 adults age 18 or older, including 500 cell phone interviews.



Pew Poll: If No Deal is Struck, Four-in-Ten Say Let the Sequester Happen    Thursday, February 21, 2013
After a series of fiscal crises over the past few years, the public is not expressing a particular sense of urgency over the pending March 1 sequester deadline. With little more than a week to go, barely a quarter have heard a lot about the scheduled cuts, while about as many have heard nothing at all. And if the president and Congress cannot reach a deficit reduction agreement before the deadline, 40% of Americans say it would be better to let the automatic spending cuts go into effect, while 49% say it would be better to delay the cuts. Both Republicans and independents are divided evenly over which approach is better, and even among Democrats, roughly a third favor letting the sequester take effect over any delays. The new survey, conducted Feb. 13-18, 2013 with 1,504 adults nationwide, is the first in a collaboration between the Pew Research Center and USA TODAY. It finds that, as with previous conflicts over the debt ceiling and fiscal cliff, Obama holds the upper hand politically over congressional Republicans. If there is no deficit deal by March 1, 49% say congressional Republicans would be more to blame while just 31% would mostly blame President Obama. Moreover, 76% say that the president and Congress should focus on a combination of spending cuts and tax increases to reduce the budget deficit. Just 19% agree with the current Republican position that tax increases should be off the table. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted February 7-10, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,004 adults age 18 or older, including 504 cell phone interviews.The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted February 14-17, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,003 adults age 18 or older, including 502 cell phone interviews.


Pew Poll: Hagel Better Known, Viewed More Negatively    Wednesday, February 20, 2013
Unfavorable opinions of Chuck Hagel have increased over the past month as he has faced a bruising confirmation battle to become President Obama’s secretary of defense. A national survey by the Pew Research Center, conducted Feb. 14-17 among 1,003 adults, finds that 22% have a favorable opinion of Hagel while 28% have an unfavorable view; 50% express no opinion about the former Nebraska GOP senator. A month ago, shortly after his nomination, opinions about Hagel were divided: 18% had a favorable view, 17% an unfavorable opinion and nearly two-thirds (65%) had no opinion. Over this period, the percentage holding a very unfavorable opinion of Hagel has nearly doubled – from 7% to 13%. Currently, more than twice as many Republicans view Hagel unfavorably as favorably (36% vs. 15%); 48% have no opinion. In January, 15% viewed him favorably, 26% unfavorably, and 59% expressed no opinion. Views of Hagel are particularly negative among Republicans and Republican leaners who agree with the Tea Party: 48% view him unfavorably, including 26% very unfavorably, while just 15% have a favorable view. Among Democrats and independents, the balance of opinion about Hagel also has grown more negative. Currently, 31% of Democrats view Hagel favorably while 23% view him unfavorably; 46% still have no opinion. In January, two-thirds of Democrats expressed no opinion of Hagel; among those who had an opinion, favorable views outnumbered unfavorable opinions by two-to-one (23% to 10%). Independents’ views of Hagel also have turned more negative over the past month. The survey also finds that the public expresses mixed views of Marco Rubio, following his response to Obama’s State of the Union address. Overall, 26% view Rubio favorably, 29% unfavorably, and 46% cannot offer a rating. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted February 14-17, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,003 adults age 18 or older, including 502 cell phone interviews.


Pew Poll: Most Approve of Ending Saturday Mail Delivery    Thursday, February 14, 2013
A majority of Americans (54%) approve of the U.S. Postal Service’s recent decision to halt Saturday delivery of letters, while 32% disapprove of the decision. The planned end of Saturday mail delivery is a rare government decision that garners bipartisan support – 58% of independents approve of the action, as do 57% of Republicans and 51% of Democrats. Most Americans say they have heard or read at least a little about the Postal Service’s announcement that they plan to stop Saturday delivery of letters to address budget shortfalls. Majorities of those who have heard a lot (67%) or a little (56%) about the action approve of it. But those who have heard nothing at all about the decision – 16% of the public – disapprove of stopping Saturday mail delivery by more than two-to-one (60% disapprove vs. 25% approve). The national survey by the Pew Research Center, conducted Feb. 7-10 among 1,004 adults, finds that blacks are the only major demographic group in which a majority (55%) opposes the Postal Service decision to halt Saturday delivery. Whites approve of the decision by more than two-to-one (61% to 26%). Fewer blacks than whites have heard about the Postal Service’s announcement that it is stopping Saturday deliveries because of budget problems. Nearly three-in-ten blacks (29%) say they heard nothing at all about the announcement, compared with 12% of whites. People younger than 30 are far less aware of the Postal Service announcement than older people – 42% of those 18-to-29 heard nothing at all about it, compared with just 10% of those 30 and older. Those under 30 also are the only age group in which a majority does not support the decision (38% approve). Those who use the mail infrequently, or don’t use it at all, are more supportive of the decision to end Saturday delivery than are those who send or receive letters on a weekly basis. Among the third of Americans (34%) who  seldom or never use the mail for personal letters, 61% approve of the decision to end Saturday delivery and just 21% disapprove. Opinion is more evenly divided among the 40% who send or receive personal letters weekly or more: 50% approve of the decision while 44% disapprove. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted February 7-10, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,004 adults age 18 or older, including 504 cell phone interviews.

What President Obama should (and shouldn’t) say in the State of the Union    Wednesday, February 13, 2013
If President Obama wants immigration reform that includes a path to citizenship for undocumented workers, he may not want to mention it at all in tonight’s State of the Union speech, a new Washington Post poll suggests. Seven in 10 people in the survey said they would support a path to citizenship, including 60 percent of Republicans. But when the same question was asked of a separate sample of respondents, this time with Obama’s name attached to it, support dropped to 59 percent overall and just 39 percent among Republicans. On other hot-button issues like banning the sale of semi-automatic assault weapons or ending the war in Afghanistan, however, lending Obama’s name to the proposal made each viewed more favorably — and therefore if he were to put his political weight behind them it could actually increase their chances of passing. On doing something about climate change, there was no noticeable movement. On a path to citizenship, Republicans don’t mind the idea in theory but loathe it when attached to Obama. Independents are slightly less likely to support a path to citizenship if it is cast as Obama’s proposal, while Democrats favor it in basically the same numbers with or without the president’s name being mentioned. The reverse is also true. While six in 10 Democrats support an assault weapons ban, that number jumps to more than three in four when the proposal is cast as Obama’s. Independents move slightly more in favor of an assault weapon ban when Obama is tied to it, while Republicans don’t like the idea with or without Obama.The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted January 31 - February 10, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,775 adults age 18 or older, including 892 cell phone interviews.


Pew Poll: Continued Support for U.S. Drone Strikes    Monday, February 11, 2013
While U.S. drone strikes have faced new scrutiny in recent weeks, a majority of the public continues to support the program. Overall, 56% approve of the U.S. conducting missile strikes from pilotless aircraft to target extremists in countries such as Pakistan, Yemen and Somalia; just 26% say they disapprove. Opinion is largely unchanged from last July, when 55% approved of the program. Support for drone attacks crosses party lines: 68% of Republicans and 58% of Democrats say they approve of U.S. drone strikes. There also are stark gender differences in opinions about the use of drones: Men approve of drone strikes by more than three-to-one (68% to 21%). Among women, 44% approve, while 31% disapprove. The latest national survey by the Pew Research Center finds that while drone strikes draw continued support, there is widespread concern that the attacks endanger innocent civilians. Overall, 53% say they are very concerned about whether drone strikes put the lives of civilians in danger. Even among those who approve of the program, 42% say they are very concerned the attacks risk lives of innocent civilians. Other possible consequences from drone attacks spur less public concern: 32% are very concerned they could lead to retaliation from extremist groups, 31% are very concerned the attacks are being conducted legally and 26% worry they could damage America’s reputation around the world. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted February 7-10, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,004 adults age 18 or older, including 504 cell phone interviews.


Pew Poll: Little Change in Views of Importance of State of the Union    Monday, February 11, 2013
A plurality of the public (43%) views Barack Obama’s upcoming State of the Union as about as important as past years’ addresses. About a third (32%) say Obama’s speech will be more important than those in past years, while 15% say it will be less important. Opinions about the importance of Obama’s State of the Union are little changed from last year or 2011. Last year, 46% expected the address to be about as important as those of past years; 36% said it would be more important and 14% said it would be less important. These views also are in line with expectations for most of George W. Bush’s State of the Unions. The exceptions were 2002 and 2003, following the 9/11 attacks and before the Iraq war, when majorities viewed Bush’s State of the Union as more important. In 2008, when Bush gave his final State of the Union, just 19% viewed it as more important. As in past years, there are wide partisan differences in opinions about the importance of Obama’s State of the Union address. Far more Democrats (46%) than independents (28%) or Republicans (21%) say Obama’s speech this year will be important than those in prior years. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted February 7-10, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,004 adults age 18 or older, including 504 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: Public Hearing Better News about Housing and Financial Markets    Wednesday, February 06, 2013
As Barack Obama begins his second term in office, the public is hearing a mix of good and bad news about the economy, as it has for much of the past four years. Views of news about real estate values and financial markets have improved and are as positive as they have been in the last four years. But these relative bright spots are counterbalanced by persistently negative views of news about gas prices and prices for food and consumer goods. For the first time, as many say they are hearing mostly good news (25%) as bad news (24%) about real estate values; the remainder (40%) says the news is mixed. In 2009, far more saw the news about real estate as bad than good and the balance worsened considerably in 2010 and 2011. The latest survey by the Pew Research Center finds that perceptions of news about financial markets have become more positive since the end of last year. Nonetheless, more say the news about the financial markets is mostly bad (28%) than mostly good (18%); 44% say the news is a mix of good and bad. The job situation also is viewed less negatively: 42% say the news about jobs is mostly bad, the lowest percentage in nearly a year and far lower than the 71% who viewed job news negatively in June 2009. By contrast, views of news about prices for food and consumer goods remain broadly negative and have shown no improvement over Obama’s first term. Half (50%) say they are hearing mostly bad news about consumer prices; just 7% say they are hearing mostly good news. In June 2009, shortly after Obama took office, impressions of news about prices were less negative (39% mostly bad news vs. 9% mostly good news). By a 53%-8% margin more say they are hearing mostly bad news about gas prices than mostly good news. The percentage hearing mostly bad news about gas prices has jumped 11 points since December and 22 points since July. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted January 31 - February 3, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,000 adults age 18 or older, including 500 cell phone interviews.

52 Percent of Americans Say Sandy Hook Is Being Exploited for Political Gain    Thursday, January 31, 2013
As gun rights and gun control are debated in the wake of the Sandy Hook school shooting, a majority of Americans say elected officials are “exploiting” the tragedy.  The new Reason-Rupe poll finds 52 percent of Americans believe that elected officials are exploiting the tragedy for political gain, while 41 percent feel elected officials are acting responsibly. Democrats differ sharply from independents and Republicans on the issue. Seventy-one percent of Republicans and 60 percent of independents think the tragedy is being politicized, while just 32 percent of Democrats believe so. Reason-Rupe finds that over half, 51 percent, of Americans say people “should be allowed to own assault weapons,” while 44 percent say people “should be prohibited from owning assault weapons.” Once again there is a substantial political divide: 68 percent of Republicans and 57 percent of independents say assault weapons should be allowed. However, just 33 percent of Democrats agree. Democrats, who normally count on the youth vote, may be surprised to find that 70 percent of 18-24 year-olds and 58 percent of 25-34 year-olds say “assault weapons should be allowed.” Similarly, Republicans, who usually rely upon the senior vote, will find that 57 percent of 55-64 year-olds and 61 percent of people over the age of 65 say assault weapons should be prohibited. As Congress gets ready to debate new gun restrictions, just 27 percent of Americans say the federal assault weapons ban that expired in 2004 would’ve helped avoid the tragedy if it were still in place. Over two-thirds, 67 percent, say the ban would not have helped avoid the shooting. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted January 17-21, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,000 adults age 18 or older, including 500 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: Broad Support for Combat Roles for Women    Tuesday, January 29, 2013
The public broadly supports the military’s decision to lift restrictions on women in combat. Two-thirds (66%) support allowing women in the military to serve in ground units that engage in close combat, while just 26% are opposed. Opinion on this question is little changed from a Washington Post/ABC News survey two years ago. The latest national survey by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press and The Washington Post finds that the public is evenly divided over whether allowing women to take on combat roles represents a major change for the U.S. military: 47% say it is, while an equal percentage says this is just a minor change. The survey, conducted after Defense Secretary Leon Panetta ended the ban on women serving in ground combat units, finds that most Americans (58%) think that the policy shift will improve opportunities for women in the military. By contrast, fewer think the decision will have an impact on military effectiveness. Nearly half (49%) say allowing women to serve in combat roles will not make much difference to military effectiveness; among those who say it will have an impact, nearly twice as many say this will make military effectiveness better (29%) rather than worse (15%). The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted January 24-27, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,005 adults age 18 or older, including 502 cell phone interviews.

Tracking for Health    Monday, January 28, 2013
Seven in ten (69%) U.S. adults track a health indicator for themselves or a loved one and many say this activity has changed their overall approach to health, according to a new survey by the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project. This is the first national survey measuring health data tracking, which has been shown in clinical studies to be a tool for improving outcomes, particularly among people trying to lose weight or manage a chronic condition.

Pew Poll: Deficit Reduction Rises on Public's Agenda for Obama's Second Term    Friday, January 25, 2013
When Barack Obama took office four years ago, reducing the budget deficit was a middle-tier item on the public’s agenda. Only about half of Americans (53%) viewed it as a top policy priority in January 2009, placing it ninth on a list of 20 policy goals. But as Obama begins his second term, only the economy and jobs are viewed as more important priorities for the coming year. Currently, 72% say that reducing the budget deficit should be a top priority, up 19 points from four years ago. The latest national survey by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press finds that Americans continue to view other domestic initiatives as important priorities as well, despite their focus on the deficit. Growing numbers give high priority to dealing with education, the problems of the poor, crime and the environment. Fully 70% say that improving the educational system should be a top priority, up from 61% in January 2009. And 57% rate dealing with the problems of the poor and needy as a top priority; four years ago, 50% viewed this as a top priority. The survey finds that 52% view protecting the environment as a top policy priority, up 11 points from January 2009. However, dealing with global warming remains at the bottom of the public’s agenda for 2013; just 28% see this as a top priority, little changed from recent years. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted January 9-13, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,503 adults age 18 or older, including 750 cell phone interviews.

Fewer Splurge Over the Holidays    Tuesday, January 22, 2013
Were you naughty or nice over the holidays? Nice -- that is, to your pocketbook. Most people say they landed squarely on the nice list, with 82 percent of Americans reporting that their holiday spending came in at or under expectations. On the naughty side, 16 percent of consumers say they spent more than expected, according to Bankrate's January 2013 Financial Security Index. The 2012 holiday season was consistent with the two previous years. In January 2011, 19 percent of Americans said they had overspent during the holidays, and a year later, 17 percent said they spent more than expected for the holidays. Saving or spending less than expected was also in line with previous years, with 28 percent coming in under budget this year, compared to last year's 24 percent and 27 percent in 2011. Though consumers' estimated budgets may have been in line with previous years, the forecast for the holiday sales season shows a slight dip from 2011, according to Chris Christopher, a senior principal economist and director of U.S. and global consumer markets with IHS Global Insight, a global market information and analytics company. "We suspect holiday sales should be in the neighborhood of approximately 3.9 percent higher than last year," Christopher says. "For the past two years, they were around 5.5 percent higher." The final official figures won't be known until later this month. There were myriad drains on spending enthusiasm in 2012, including the generally sluggish economy and consumer confidence going over the proverbial cliff at the end of the year. "Our analysis is that the run-up to Christmas was not very strong," Christopher says. In late October, Superstorm Sandy disrupted luxury shopping in New York City, and then "after the election, the 'fiscal cliff' became paramount to the American household, and then consumer confidence fell dramatically," he says. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted January 3-6, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,003 adults age 18 or older, including 502 cell phone interviews.

Library Services in the Digital Age    Tuesday, January 22, 2013
The internet has already had a major impact on how people find and access information, and now the rising popularity of e-books is helping transform Americans’ reading habits. In this changing landscape, public libraries are trying to adjust their services to these new realities while still serving the needs of patrons who rely on more traditional resources. In a new survey of Americans’ attitudes and expectations for public libraries, the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project finds that many library patrons are eager to see libraries’ digital services expand, yet also feel that print books remain important in the digital age.

Pew Poll: Obama in Strong Position at Start of Second Term    Thursday, January 17, 2013
As he prepares for his second inauguration, Barack Obama is in a stronger position with the public than he was over much of his first term. At 52%, his job approval rating is among the highest since the early months of his presidency. His personal favorability, currently 59%, has rebounded from a low of 50% in the fall campaign. And increasing percentages describe him as a strong leader, able to get things done and as someone who stands up for his beliefs. Obama’s political advantage is enhanced by the poor standing of his Republican counterparts. The latest national survey by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press, conducted Jan. 9-13 among 1,502 adults finds that both House Speaker John Boehner and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell are viewed more unfavorably than favorably. The Republican Party’s image, which reached a recent high of 42% favorable following the GOP convention this past summer, has fallen once again to a low of just 33%. Much of this decline has come among Republicans themselves. Favorable opinions of the GOP among Republicans have fallen 20 points since September (from 89% to 69%) and are now as low as at any point during the past 20 years. While his personal image is strong, Obama’s current j0b rating is not high compared with other two-term presidents since World War II. Among presidents dating back to Harry S. Truman, only George W. Bush began his second term with a rating about as low as Obama’s (50% approval in January 2005). To a degree, this reflects the partisan polarization in opinions about both Obama and Bush; Obama’s current rating among Republicans (14% approve) is about the same as Bush’s among Democrats eight years ago (17%). Among recent two-term presidents, none has had a significantly better job approval mark at the end of his presidency than at the start of his second term. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted January 9-13, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,502 adults age 18 or older, including 750 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: Roe v. Wade at 40: Most Oppose Overturning Abortion Decision    Wednesday, January 16, 2013
As the 40th anniversary of the Supreme Court’s Roe v. Wade decision approaches, the public remains opposed to completely overturning the historic ruling on abortion. More than six-in-ten (63%) say they would not like to see the court completely overturn the Roe v. Wade decision, which established a woman’s constitutional right to abortion at least in the first three months of pregnancy. Only about three-in-ten (29%) would like to see the ruling overturned. These opinions are little changed from surveys conducted 10 and 20 years ago. Decades after the Supreme Court rendered its decision, on Jan. 22, 1973, most Americans (62%) know that Roe v. Wade dealt with abortion rather than school desegregation or some other issue. But the rest either guess incorrectly (17%) or do not know what the case was about (20%). And there are substantial age differences in awareness: Among those ages 50 to 64, 74% know that Roe v. Wade dealt with abortion, the highest percentage of any age group. Among those younger than 30, just 44% know this. The latest national survey by the Pew Research Center finds that abortion is viewed as a less important issue than in the past. Currently, 53% say abortion “is not that important compared to other issues,” up from 48% in 2009 and 32% in 2006. The percentage viewing abortion as a “critical issue facing the country” fell from 28% in 2006 to 15% in 2009 and now stands at 18%. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted January 9-13, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,502 adults age 18 or older, including 750 cell phone interviews.


Pew Poll: In Gun Control Debate, Several Options Draw Majority Support    Tuesday, January 15, 2013
While the issue of gun control remains divisive, there are clear areas of agreement when it comes to a number of gun policy proposals. Fully 85% of Americans favor making private gun sales and sales at gun shows subject to background checks, with comparable support from Republicans, Democrats and independents. Similarly, 80% support laws to prevent mentally ill people from purchasing guns, with broad support across party lines. But this bipartisan consensus breaks down when it comes to other proposals. Two-thirds of Americans (67%) favor creating a federal database to track gun sales, but there is a wide partisan divide between Democrats (84%) and Republicans (49%). A smaller majority of the public (55%) favors a ban on assault-style weapons; Democrats (69%) also are far more likely than Republicans (44%) to support this. Similar partisan divides exist when it comes to banning high-capacity ammunition clips or the sale of ammunition online. The latest national survey by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press also tested two specific school-safety proposals, with widely different results. By a two-to-one margin (64%-32%), most favor putting armed security guards and police in more schools. But when it comes to more teachers and school officials having guns, most are opposed (40% favor vs. 57% oppose). The latter option is particularly divisive across party lines: 56% of Republicans would like to see more teachers and school officials armed, compared with just 23% of Democrats. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted January 9-13, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,502 adults age 18 or older, including 750 cell phone interviews.

Poll Finds That Obama’s Base Overlaps With Gun-Control Coalition    Tuesday, January 15, 2013
As President Obama readies a new push for gun-control legislation, he will rely on the support of the same political coalition that thrust him into a second term last November: young people, minorities, and college-educated women. A slim majority of Americans, 51 percent, believe that controlling gun ownership is more important than protecting the right of Americans to own firearms, according to the latest United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection Poll. But beneath that divided topline were far more telling cleavages. The survey showed that the gun-control debate in America has split along the same fault lines—by age group, ethnicity, gender, even region—that marked the 2012 presidential contest between Obama and Mitt Romney. As the gun-control debate shifts from the White House to Capitol Hill, with Vice President Joe Biden set to unveil his task-force proposals on Tuesday, the question is whether Obama can mold his winning electoral coalition into a successful legislative one. The challenge will be particularly acute in the GOP-controlled House, where most Republicans represent the kind of voters who are resistant to new gun restrictions. In the survey, those same younger Americans, between the ages of 18 and 29, who fueled Obama’s rise and reelection, were the most supportive (56 percent) among all age groups of the focus on stricter gun control. Similarly, minorities, another key part of the Obama coalition, were overwhelmingly in favor of prioritizing gun control over gun rights, the poll showed. A full 69 percent of nonwhites preferred focusing on gun control; in contrast, 52 percent of whites preferred to focus on protecting the right to own guns. Obama struggled mightily during 2012 among white men without a college degree; the push for gun control falters with that group, as well. A solid 62 percent of them said the focus should be on gun rights. The poll found that the gun-control movement has made inroads among one key swing constituency that Obama and Romney fought hard to win over: educated white women. Two-thirds of white women with a college degree said they preferred to focus on gun control; 30 percent favored focusing on gun rights. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted January 10-13, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,001 adults age 18 or older, including 500 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: Obama Viewed as Fiscal Cliff Victor; Legislation Gets Lukewarm Reception    Monday, January 07, 2013
Barack Obama is viewed as the clear political winner in the fiscal cliff negotiations, but the legislation itself gets only a lukewarm reception from the public: As many disapprove as approve of the new tax legislation, and more say it will have a negative than positive impact on the federal budget deficit, the national economy and people like themselves. The latest national survey by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press finds that 57% say that Obama got more of what he wanted from the tax legislation while just 20% say Republican leaders got more of what they wanted. And while 48% approve of the way Obama handled the fiscal cliff negotiations only 19% approve of the way GOP leaders handled the negotiations. Republicans take a particularly sour view of the outcome: just 16% approve of the final legislation, and by a 74% to 11% margin they think Obama got more of what he wanted. Only 40% of Republicans approve of how their party’s leaders handled the negotiations; by comparison, fully 81% of Democrats approve of how Obama handled the negotiations. Relatively few Americans expect that the tax legislation that resulted from those talks will help people like themselves, the budget deficit, or the national economy. Just three-in-ten Americans say the tax measure will mostly help people like them; 52% say it will mostly hurt. And even when it comes to the budget deficit, 44% say the deal will mostly hurt, while 33% say it will mostly help. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted January 3-6, 2013 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,003 adults age 18 or older, including 502 cell phone interviews.


Pew Poll: After Newtown, Modest Change in Opinion about Gun Control    Thursday, December 20, 2012
The public’s attitudes toward gun control have shown only modest change in the wake of last week’s deadly shooting at an elementary school in Newtown, Connecticut. Currently, 49% say it is more important to control gun ownership, while 42% say it is more important to protect the right of Americans to own guns. This marks the first time since Barack Obama took office that more Americans prioritize gun control than the right to own guns. Opinion was evenly divided in July, following a shooting at a Colorado movie theater. At that time, 47% said it was more important to control gun ownership, while 46% said it was more important to protect gun rights.However, support for gun control remains lower than before Obama took office. In April 2008, 58% said it was more important to control gun ownership; just 37% prioritized protecting gun rights. As in the past, there are wide partisan and demographic differences in opinions about gun control. Majorities of men, whites and Republicans say it is more important to protect gun rights. By contrast, most women, blacks, Democrats and those in the Northeast prioritize controlling gun ownership. In other regions, opinion is divided. There are deeply held opinions on both sides when it comes to the choice between controlling gun ownership and protecting gun rights: 42% strongly believe it is more important to control gun ownership, while 37% strongly feel it is more important to protect the right of Americans to own guns. The latest national survey by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press finds a higher percentage saying that gun ownership in this country does more to protect people from crime (48%) than to put their safety at risk (37%). However, about two-thirds (65%) think that allowing citizens to own assault weapons makes the country more dangerous. Just 21% say that permitting these types of weapons makes the country safer. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted December 16-19, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,219 adults age 18 or older, including 485 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: Public Divided over What Newtown Signifies    Monday, December 17, 2012

The shootings at an elementary school in Newtown, Conn. on Friday have drawn widespread public interest. A weekend survey finds that 57% of Americans say they followed news about the tragedy there very closely. That is higher than interest in the shootings at an Aurora, Colo. movie theater in July (49% very closely), though not as great as interest in the Columbine shootings in 1999 (68%). The survey by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press, conducted Dec. 14-16 among 746 adults, finds the public is evenly divided over whether the Newtown shootings reflect broader problems in Americans society (47%) or are just the acts of troubled individuals (44%). By contrast, clear majorities said that both the Aurora shootings, as well as the shootings in Tucson, Ariz. in Jan. 2011, were just the isolated acts of troubled individuals; 67% said that after the Aurora shootings at a movie theater and 58% said that after the Tucson shootings, which killed six and left former Rep. Gabrielle Giffords seriously wounded. Opinions today are comparable to reactions to the shootings on the campus of Virginia Tech University in April 2007. Most parents are talking with their children about the massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary School, according to a separate survey of more than 750 adults with children at home, conducted Dec. 14-17, using Google Consumer Surveys. About half (53%) of all the parents who participated in the survey, including 71% of those with younger children, say they are restricting how much news coverage of the tragedy their children watch. Women, by 54% to 37%, say that Friday’s shootings at the elementary school reflect broader problems in American society. Men express the opposite view: 51% say that shootings like this are just the isolated acts of troubled individuals. College graduates (54%) are more likely than those with no more than a high school education (42%) to say that the massacre reflects broader societal problems.The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted December 13-16, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,006 adults age 18 or older, including 405 cell phone interviews.


Poll Shows Public Skeptical of Trimming Home-Mortgage Deductions    Wednesday, December 12, 2012
As Congress and President Obama prepare to cut government spending and increase revenue sufficient to avoid the so-called fiscal cliff, Americans are divided on specific revenue-raisers currently under consideration, according to results of the latest United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection Poll. The survey shows that, on balance, Americans are open to reducing key tax deductions and credits for those earning more than $250,000 a year, but there is only limited support to reducing those credits for all taxpayers. The new poll focused on the various debt-reduction proposals being considered by the lame-duck Congress as it attempts to avoid the fiscal cliff—a combination of automatic spending cuts and expiring tax breaks set to be triggered at the start of the new year. Respondents were asked about four common deductions and credits, and whether, as part of a plan to reduce the deficit, they should be reduced for all taxpayers, only for those taxpayers making more than $250,000 per year, or for no taxpayers. Though short of a majority, 41 percent of respondents said they think the interest deduction on home mortgages should be reduced for all taxpayers. That compares with 21 percent who think the mortgage-interest deduction should be reduced only for higher-income taxpayers, and 31 percent who oppose reducing it for any taxpayers. The results for the other three credits mentioned were similar: 41 percent think the tax exemption for employer-provided health insurance should be reduced for all, while 19 percent favor reducing it only for the wealthy, and 30 percent do not favor reducing it for anyone. Additionally, 42 percent think the deduction for state and local taxes should be reduced for all taxpayers, 19 percent would reduce it for those making more than $250,000 a year, and 31 percent think it should not be reduced for any taxpayers. A slightly higher percentage of Americans—37 percent—oppose reducing the deduction for charitable donations for any taxpayers. Still, 38 percent support reducing it for all taxpayers, and 19 percent think it should be reduced only for the wealthy. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted December 6-9, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,001 adults age 18 or older, including 401 cell phone interviews.

Poll Shows Americans Fear Entitlement Cuts the Most in 'Cliff' Talks    Tuesday, December 11, 2012
As President Obama and congressional leaders race to avert the fiscal cliff, Americans remain concerned that whatever budget deal they strike will cut too much from Medicare and Social Security, according to a new poll. More of the Americans surveyed (35 percent) are worried about such cutbacks than seeing their tax bill rise (27 percent), the latest United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection Poll has found. Lagging behind in the public prioritization is the fear that a budget accord would fall short of deficit-reduction targets (15 percent) or that it will allow the federal government to spend too much in coming years (13 percent).
The plurality have already fingered a favorite scapegoat if Congress and the White House fail to reach an agreement: everyone. Exactly half of those surveyed said that they would blame President Obama, congressional Democrats, and congressional Republicans equally for the failure. While 27 percent of respondents would blame the GOP solely, only 16 percent said they’d blame Obama, and 5 percent said congressional Democrats. Combined, the results should be welcome news for Democrats itching to take a hard line in the fiscal-cliff negotiations: They show the public is nervous, as they are, about entitlement cuts, and that Democratic lawmakers likely won’t be blamed if the talks go south. Still, there is reason for caution among Democrats contemplating what’s become known in Washington as “cliff diving.” The gap between those worried about entitlements and taxes has actually narrowed since the National Journal survey in October. Then, there was a 12-percentage-point gap in favor of entitlements; now, it stands at 8 points.  The public has steadfastly opposed the automatic spending cuts known as sequestration that would take effect if no deal is reached. In the survey, 63 percent called them a “bad idea.” Only 22 percent thought they should go into effect. Support for the cuts never topped 27 percent across all ages, income brackets, and levels of education. If lawmakers fail to reach a deal, independents, unsurprisingly, are more likely than either Democrats or Republicans to chide both political parties. A full 61 percent of independents said they’d blame both parties equally, compared with only 37 percent of Democrats and 49 percent of Republicans. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted December 6-9, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,001 adults age 18 or older, including 401 cell phone interviews.


Pew Poll: Pessimism About Fiscal Cliff Deal, Republicans Still Get More Blame    Tuesday, December 04, 2012
With Washington making little apparent progress in efforts to avoid going over the “fiscal cliff,” public opinion about the situation has changed little over the past three weeks. The latest national survey by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press and The Washington Post finds continued pessimism over prospects for a deficit agreement. Four-in-ten (40%) expect that the president and congressional Republicans will reach a deal by Jan. 1 to prevent automatic tax increases and spending cuts from taking effect; 49% say they will not. If no deal is reached, far more say congressional Republicans would be more to blame (53%) than President Obama (27%). These opinions are virtually unchanged since early November. Democrats continue to be much more optimistic about prospects for a fiscal cliff compromise than either Republicans or independents. A majority of Democrats (55%) expect Obama and congressional Republicans will reach an agreement before Jan. 1 to prevent the automatic tax increases and spending cuts. Just 37% of independents and 22% of Republicans say an agreement will be reached. Most Americans feel like they have only a dim understanding of what might happen if the automatic spending cuts and tax increase go into effect. Just 28% say they understand the consequences very well, while 29% understand them fairly well. These impressions also have changed little over the past three weeks. Nonetheless, the public continues to see dire consequences – both for the nation’s economy and themselves – if the government goes over the fiscal cliff. While more say the nation’s economy (64%) than their own finances (43%) would be greatly affected, roughly six-in-ten say the impact would be negative for both the economy generally (60%) and their own personal finances (61%). The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted November 30 - December 2, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,003 adults age 18 or older, including 402 cell phone interviews.

Poll Shows Public Wants Entitlements Left Untouched    Tuesday, December 04, 2012
As Democrats and Republicans in Washington remain at odds over how to reshape the nation’s finances and prevent it from falling over the fiscal cliff, the public is supportive of cutting spending and at the same time more protective than ever of entitlement programs such as Medicare.
Traditional cleavages of class and race, age and income, and even region are apparent in the latest edition of the United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection Poll, but they are far more muted than on issues such as President Obama’s reelection or the fate of his signature health care law. When it comes to the tax and spending issues that are at the heart of negotiations in Washington, primarily between the president and House Speaker John Boehner, the public is eager to defend the entitlement programs that both leaders have acknowledged need to be reined in if the nation’s $16 billion debt is to stop growing, let alone shrink. Consider Medicare, with its swelling costs. The health care program for the elderly is at the center of discussions, and prominent panels that have studied the deficit and issued recommendations have often targeted it. But a full 79 percent of those surveyed want the fiscal-cliff negotiators not to cut the program at all. Only 17 percent would be willing to see it cut some, and a minuscule 3 percent would be OK with it being cut a lot. At the end of an election year in which the public was riven, the unanimity with which the public rallies around this 47-year-old program is striking. As for gender, 71 percent of men want no cuts to Medicare, and 87 percent of women agree. There was a similar racial divide, with 93 percent of non-Hispanic blacks wanting the program exempt from cuts versus 78 percent of whites. Interestingly, men over age 50 were more open to cuts: Only 68 percent of them said the program shouldn’t be cut at all. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted November 30 - December 2, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,003 adults age 18 or older, including 402 cell phone interviews.


Poll Shows Ambivalence on Fiscal Cliff, Support for Rice    Monday, December 03, 2012
As the White House and congressional Republicans try to keep the nation from going over the so-called fiscal cliff, a new survey finds that the public is amenable to raising taxes on wealthier Americans and as averse as ever to cutting entitlement programs. The results are found in the latest edition of the United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection Poll, which tracks public opinion about important issues facing Congress. On the contentious question of whether the Senate should approve the nomination of U.N. Ambassador Susan Rice if President Obama picks her to be secretary of State, a slim majority of respondents—51 percent—favored her approval, while 35 percent said that her nomination should be rejected if it’s put before the Senate. The question noted that “some Republicans oppose her nomination because they say she provided misleading information about the role of terrorists in the recent attack on the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya,” while also noting that Democrats insist that “Rice was only relying on information about the attack provided to her at the time and that the president is entitled to place his own choice in the position.” Concerning the fiscal cliff, the poll, which dives deeply into policy issues, asked voters what they thought the best way was to raise revenue from higher-income earners. A plurality, 39 percent, said that both their tax rates should be raised and their tax deductions should be scaled back. In addition to raising tax rates on income above $250,000—something the president advocates and something that will happen if Congress doesn’t act to prevent it—Congress is considering an overall cap on deductions. On the larger issue of how best to lower the federal deficit, 38 percent of respondents said that half the money should come from tax increases and half should come from spending cuts. An equal number said that two-thirds of the money should come from spending cuts and one-third from taxes. Only 16 percent said that two-thirds of the money should come from tax increases and one-third from spending cuts. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted November 30 - December 2, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,003 adults age 18 or older, including 402 cell phone interviews.

The Best (and Worst) of Mobile Connectivity    Friday, November 30, 2012
Some 85% of American adults own a cell phone, and these mobile devices now play a central role in many aspects of their owners’ lives according to a new survey. For many cell owners, their phone is an essential utility that they check frequently, keep close at all times, and would have trouble functioning without.

Parents, Teens, and Online Privacy    Tuesday, November 20, 2012
Most parents of teenagers are concerned about what their teenage children do online and how their behavior could be monitored by others. Some parents are taking steps to observe, discuss, and check up on their children’s digital footprints, according to a survey by the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project. These findings are based on a nationally representative phone survey of 802 parents and their 802 teens ages 12-17. It was conducted between July 26 and September 30, 2012. Interviews were conducted in English and Spanish and on landline and cell phones.These findings are based on a nationally representative phone survey of 802 parents and their 802 teens ages 12-17. It was conducted between July 26 and September 30, 2012. Interviews were conducted in English and Spanish and on landline and cell phones.

Pew Poll: More Following 'Fiscal Cliff' Debate than Petraeus Investigation    Tuesday, November 20, 2012
In a busy news week, more Americans say they followed the debate over the “fiscal cliff” very closely than the investigations into the Libya embassy attack, renewed violence in the Middle East or the FBI investigation that led to David Petraeus’s resignation as CIA Director after it found he was having an extra-marital affair. The latest national survey by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press, conducted Nov. 15-18 among 1,002 adults, finds that nearly identical percentages of Republicans (36%) and Democrats (35%) say they very closely followed the debate over the automatic spending cuts and tax increases that will take effect at the beginning of next year unless the president and Congress act. Republicans are about as interested as Democrats in the Petraeus investigation (28% vs. 21%). But there is a wide partisan gap in interest in another major story of the week; Republicans (42%) are much more likely than Democrats (21%) or independents (22%) to say they very closely followed the investigation into the September attack on the U.S. embassy in Benghazi, Libya very closely. While interest in the investigation that uncovered Petraeus’s affair is modest, 30% of Americans say the news is of great importance to the nation, while 32% say it is of some importance; 32% say it is of very little or no importance. Republicans are significantly more likely than Democrats to say the Petraeus situation is of great importance (43% vs. 27%). Notably, more people say the Petraeus situation is of either great or some importance (62%) than said that about Bill Clinton’s affair with Monica Lewinsky in February 1998 (52%), shortly after news of Clinton’s affair broke. There was a much wider partisan gap in perceptions of the importance of the Clinton-Lewinsky affair: Among Republicans, 42% said the scandal was of great importance to the nation, compared with 9% of Democrats. Fully 65% of Democrats said it was of little or no importance to the nation. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted November 15-18, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,002 adults age 18 or older, including 401 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: Low Marks for the 2012 Election    Thursday, November 15, 2012
The 2012 presidential campaign was a frustrating experience for many voters, who say the campaign was more negative than usual and had less discussion of issues than in most previous campaigns. Both Obama and Romney get mixed grades for the job they did reaching out to voters, as do campaign consultants, the press and pollsters. On most measures, voters’ views of campaign 2012 fall short of the election four years ago. Similarly, voters do not have a particularly rosy outlook on national politics going forward. Fully 66% say that relations between Republicans and Democrats will either stay about the same (52%) or get worse (14%) over the next year. And while 56% of voters think Obama will be successful in his coming term, that is down from the 67% who thought his first term would be successful at this point four years ago. While broad majorities of all voters want Barack Obama (72%) and the Republican leadership (67%) to work with the other side to get things done over the coming year, each party’s political base sends mixed signals. Only about half (46%) of Republicans want GOP leaders to work with Obama to get things done, while about as many (50%) say they should stand up to Obama, even if less gets done. The message to Obama from Democrats is only somewhat more conciliatory: 54% want the president to try to work with Republicans, but 42% do not. Republicans and Republican leaners remain of the view that the GOP leaders should move in a more conservative direction, not a more moderate one, by a 57% to 35% margin. Democrats and Democratic leaners, meanwhile, continue to support more moderation from their political leaders: Nearly six-in-ten (57%) want Democratic leaders to move in a moderate direction, while 33% want them to move in a more liberal direction. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted November 8-11, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,258 adults age 18 or older, including 467 cell phone interviews.

GOP Ponders Immigration Reform, and So Does Public    Wednesday, November 14, 2012
Last week’s elections have left Americans more optimistic about the prospects of President Obama and Congress reaching agreement on the most important issues facing the federal government, according to a United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection Poll conducted ahead of the crucial lame-duck session beginning this week. That optimism is driven mainly by self-identified Democrats, and respondents express more confidence in Obama and his party than in congressional Republicans, the poll shows. Overall, more Americans say it is “very important” for Congress to “address the job situation” than the other four issues tested in the poll. The next priority was to “improve public education,” followed closely by “reduce the federal budget deficit” and “address the country’s energy needs.” Lagging behind was “address immigration policy,” although Americans remain supportive of allowing at least some illegal immigrants to remain in the country if they have broken no other laws. Fully 86 percent of respondents say that it is “very important” for Congress to act on jobs, up from 79 percent in mid-April. Another 10 percent rate it “somewhat important,” while just 2 percent say that it is “not too important” or “not at all important.” Three in four say that it is very important for Congress to act on the federal deficit, about equal with public education but ahead of energy and immigration. On the deficit, energy, and immigration, more Americans now say these are very important than in April; the earlier survey did not ask about education. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted November 8-11, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,000 adults age 18 or older, including 400 cell phone interviews.

Poll Shows Health Care Issues Net Positive for President Obama, But Economy, Candidate Characteristics Bigger Factors in Vote    Wednesday, November 14, 2012
As predicted, there was a role for health care issues in voters’ 2012 election decision, but Kaiser’s November Health Tracking Poll—fielded in the days immediately following last week’s presidential election—suggests it was a trailing issue rather than a leading one. To keep the issue list in perspective, the November survey first asked voters to name the top two factors in their vote in an open‐ended question, without providing answer choices. Here we confirm the importance of the candidates’ personal characteristics in voters’ decisions: for both those supporting President Barack Obama and those backing Governor Mitt Romney, it was the voters’ sense of the characteristics and records of the candidates themselves rather than any one issue that was at the top of their minds. Taken together, health care issues came in third (or tied for third) among both groups, volunteered by 16 percent of Obama voters and 13 percent of Romney voters as one of the two most important factors in their vote. More specifically, eight percent of all voters mentioned something about the Affordable Care Act (ACA) as important to their vote, either pro or con, while one percent volunteered something about the Medicare program and the same share volunteered Medicaid. Interestingly, while the economy and jobs were just as important as the candidates’ own strengths for Romney voters, it was named by significantly fewer Obama voters. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted November 7-10, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,223 adults age 18 or older, including 515 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: Broad Concern about 'Fiscal Cliff' Consequences    Tuesday, November 13, 2012
As the president and congressional leaders begin negotiations to avoid the “fiscal cliff” deadline at the end of the year, there is widespread public concern about the possible financial consequences. More say the automatic spending cuts and tax increases scheduled to take effect in January would have a major effect on the U.S. economy than on their own finances. But nearly identical majorities say the effect of the changes would be mostly negative for the economy (62%) and their personal financial situation (60%). The public is skeptical that President Obama and congressional Republicans will reach an agreement by the end of the year to avoid the fiscal cliff. About half (51%) say the two sides will not reach an agreement, while just 38% say they will. If no deal is reached, more say that congressional Republicans would be more to blame than President Obama (53% vs. 29%). The latest national survey by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press and The Washington Post finds sharp partisan divisions over prospects for a deal to avoid the fiscal measures from automatically taking effect. Republicans are particularly skeptical: By a 66%-25% margin more think an agreement will not be reached. By comparison, Democrats are about as likely to expect a deal to be made (47%), as not (40%). Among independents, 51% do not think President Obama and Republicans and in Congress will come to an agreement, while 37% think this will happen. If an agreement is not reached, 85% of Democrats and 53% of independents say that Republicans in Congress would be more to blame. About two-thirds of Republicans (68%) say that if an agreement is not reached, President Obama would be more to blame. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted November 8-11, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,000 adults age 18 or older, including 400 cell phone interviews.

Americans Want Congress to Act on Jobs    Monday, November 12, 2012
Last week’s elections have left Americans more optimistic about the prospects of President Obama and Congress reaching agreement on the most important issues facing the federal government, according to a United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection Poll conducted ahead of the crucial lame-duck session beginning this week. That optimism is driven mainly by self-identified Democrats, and respondents express more confidence in Obama and his party than in congressional Republicans, the poll shows. Overall, more Americans say it is “very important” for Congress to “address the job situation” than the other four issues tested in the poll. The next priority was to “improve public education,” followed closely by “reduce the federal budget deficit” and “address the country’s energy needs.” Lagging behind was “address immigration policy,” although Americans remain supportive of allowing at least some illegal immigrants to remain in the country if they have broken no other laws. Fully 86 percent of respondents say that it is “very important” for Congress to act on jobs, up from 79 percent in mid-April. Another 10 percent rate it “somewhat important,” while just 2 percent say that it is “not too important” or “not at all important.” Three in four say that it is very important for Congress to act on the federal deficit, about equal with public education but ahead of energy and immigration. On the deficit, energy, and immigration, more Americans now say these are very important than in April; the earlier survey did not ask about education. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted November 8-11, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,000 adults age 18 or older, including 400 cell phone interviews.

Brown, Warren Are Neck and Neck in Tight Senate Race    Sunday, November 04, 2012
With less than 48 hours until Election Day, the race for U.S. Senate in Massachusetts between Republican incumbent Scott Brown and Democratic challenger Elizabeth Warren is extremely close, according to a new UMass Lowell-Boston Herald poll released today.  The independent, nonpartisan poll found that Brown has a 1 percent lead over Warren among likely voters, with 49 percent for Brown and 48 percent for Warren (with a margin of error of plus or minus 4.1 percentage points). Warren has a 2 percent advantage over Brown among registered voters, with 49 percent for Warren and 47 percent for Brown (with a margin of error of plus or minus 3.7 percentage points). “Elizabeth Warren now leads among registered voters, but Brown holds a one-point edge among likely voters. What these campaigns do on the ground to get out the vote is likely to determine the winner,” said Joshua Dyck, associate professor of political science and co-director of the UMass Lowell Center for Public Opinion.  Dyck said that the UMass Lowell-Boston Herald poll uses a sophisticated seven-item turnout scale to determine likely voters by assessing whether or not a registered voter has voted in the past, if they know where to vote, and if they indicate that they will definitely vote.  In the last UMass Lowell-Boston Herald poll on the Senate race, which was released Sept. 19, Brown had 49 percent support among likely voters and 45 percent were for Warren. Among registered voters, Brown had 50 percent and Warren had 44 percent.  The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted October 31 to November 3, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 956 adults age 18 or older, including 800 likely voters.

Pew Poll: Obama Gains Edge in Campaign's Final Days - Obama 50% - Romney 47%    Sunday, November 04, 2012
Barack Obama has edged ahead of Mitt Romney in the final days of the presidential campaign. In the Pew Research Center’s election weekend survey, Obama holds a 48% to 45% lead over Romney among likely voters. The survey finds that Obama maintains his modest lead when the probable decisions of undecided voters are taken into account. Our final estimate of the national popular vote is Obama 50% and Romney 47%, when the undecided vote is allocated between the two candidates based on several indicators and opinions. A week ago the race was deadlocked, with each candidate drawing support from 47% of the likely electorate. Interviewing for the final pre-election survey was conducted Oct. 31- Nov. 3 among 2,709 likely voters. The previous survey was conducted Oct. 24-28, before Hurricane Sandy made landfall along the East Coast. Obama’s handling of the storm’s aftermath may have contributed to his improved showing. Fully 69% of all likely voters approve of the way Obama is handling the storm’s impact. Even a plurality of Romney supporters (46%) approve of Obama’s handling of the situation; more important, so too do 63% of swing voters. Voter turnout, which may be lower than in 2008 and 2004, remains one of Romney’s strengths. Romney’s supporters continue to be more engaged in the election and interested in election news than Obama supporters, and are more committed to voting. The survey also indicates that voters in the nine battleground states are as closely divided as the national electorate: 49% of likely voters in battleground states support Obama while 47% back Romney. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted October 24-28, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International.


Anger Aside, Voters Favor D.C. Status Quo    Wednesday, October 31, 2012
Despite dissatisfaction with the nation’s direction and Washington’s performance, voters lean toward retaining the status quo in Washington, the latest United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection Poll has found. This final Congressional Connection Poll before the Nov. 6 election found that among likely voters, President Obama has reopened a slim advantage over Mitt Romney, while a narrow plurality prefers that Republicans maintain House control. By a wider margin, likely voters said they prefer that Democrats retain their Senate majority. These national measures of sentiment don’t necessarily predict the results in the state-by-state and district-by-district contests that will decide House and Senate control. Yet they illuminate the competing, even contradictory, impulses among voters that are shaping the relationship between the presidential and congressional contests. The paradoxical bottom line is that even as most voters say they want to divide control of the White House and Congress to check the next president, they are displaying an increasing tendency toward party-line voting in congressional races that could make that outcome less likely. Overall, the survey found Obama leading Romney among likely voters by 50 percent to 45 percent, after the two tied at 47 percent each in a late-September Congressional Connection Poll. Conversely, the poll recorded a slight shift toward the GOP in House races. Now, 47 percent of likely voters say they would prefer that Republicans maintain their House majority, while 44 percent want Democrats to take over; Democrats held a 45 percent to 43 percent advantage in late September. Voters, by a solid 50 percent to 40 percent margin, now say they would prefer a Democratic Senate; that’s up from a 47 percent to 42 percent advantage for Democrats in September. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted Oct. 25-28, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,010 adults—including 713 likely voters by cell phone and landline—on . It has a margin of error of 3.7 percentage points for the entire sample, and 4.4 percentage points for likely voters.

Pew Poll: Presidential Race Dead Even; Romney Maintains Turnout Edge    Monday, October 29, 2012
As the presidential campaign enters its final week, Barack Obama has failed to regain much of the support he lost in the days following the first presidential debate and the race is now even among likely voters: 47% favor Obama while an identical percentage supports Mitt Romney. The latest national survey by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press finds Obama holding a statistically insignificant two-point edge among registered voters: 47% to 45%. This is little different from the 46% to 46% standoff among registered voters observed in early October, in the days following the first debate. When the sample is narrowed to likely voters, the balance of opinion shifts slightly in Romney’s direction, as it did in early October. This reflects Romney’s turnout advantage over Obama, which could loom larger as Election Day approaches. In both October surveys, more Republicans and Republican leaners than Democrats and Democratic leaners are predicted to be likely voters. In September, the gap was more modest. 2012 Election Voter Preference Trends
Track voter preferences for Obama vs. Romney overall and by demographic group among registered voters. Indeed, surveys over the past month have found Republicans becoming much more upbeat about the race and about Mitt Romney himself. More Republicans now see the campaign as interesting and informative. And compared with September, a greater proportion of Romney voters now say they are voting for him rather than against Obama. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted October 24-28, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,678 adults age 18 or older, including 1,495 likely voters.



Pew Poll: Republicans Increasingly Positive About Campaign    Thursday, October 25, 2012
Republicans express increasingly positive opinions about the presidential campaign and are now about as likely as Democrats to view the campaign as interesting and informative. In early September, shortly after the party conventions, far more Democrats than Republicans said the campaign was interesting and informative. The new survey by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press finds that 63% of the public says the campaign is interesting, while 28% say it is dull. Last month, 53% found the campaign interesting. From January through June, majorities said the campaign was dull, and no more than about four-in-ten found it interesting. Over the past month, the increase in the percentage saying the campaign is interesting has come entirely among Republicans and independents. In the new survey, conducted before Monday’s debate, 73% of Republicans say the campaign is interesting, up 23 points since early September and by far the highest percentage of the year. More independents also view the campaign as interesting (56% today, 45% in September). The percentage of Democrats who say the campaign is interesting, which jumped 19 points between June and September, is unchanged since then (66%). Compared with a month ago, far more Republicans also view the campaign informative (69% now, 49% then,). And substantially fewer say the campaign is “too long” than did so in September (42% now, 62% then). In fact, the percentage of Republicans who say the campaign is too long is now about as low as it was in January (49%) at the start of the GOP primaries. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted October 18-21, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,005 adults age 18 or older, including 404 cell phone interviews.



Presidential Campaign Donations in the Digital Age    Thursday, October 25, 2012
In June 2012, the Federal Election Commission for the first time allowed political campaigns to accept campaign contributions via text message, and both of the major presidential candidates now allow supporters to contribute directly to their campaign using a cell phone. In two surveys fielded in late September, the Pew Internet Project asked a series of questions aimed at determining how this new contribution model is fitting into Americans’ political giving habits. These findings are based on a combined analysis of two nationally representative telephone surveysThese findings are based on a combined analysis of two nationally representative telephone surveys.

Younger Americans’ Reading and Library Habits    Tuesday, October 23, 2012
The Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project has taken a special look at readers between the ages of 16 and 29 because interest in them is especially high in the library world and the publishing world. This report examines how they encounter and consume books in different formats. It flows out of a larger effort to assess the reading habits of all Americans ages 16 and older as e-books change the reading landscape and the borrowing services of libraries. The main findings in this report, including all statistics and quantitative data, are from a nationally-representative phone survey of 2,986 people ages 16 and older that was administered from November 16-December 21, 2011. This report also contains the voices and insights of an online panel of library patrons ages 16-29 who borrow e-books, fielded in the spring of 2012.The main findings in this report, including all statistics and quantitative data, are from a nationally-representative phone survey of 2,986 people ages 16 and older that was administered from November 16-December 21, 2011. This report also contains the voices and insights of an online panel of library patrons ages 16-29 who borrow e-books, fielded in the spring of 2012.

Reason-Rupe Poll: California's Voters Appear Ready to Cut Spending and Reform Public Pensions    Friday, October 19, 2012
California's Proposition 30 and Proposition 32 are too close to call, according to a new Reason-Rupe statewide poll of likely voters that finds 7 percent have already cast their ballots. Reason-Rupe finds 50 percent of likely voters intend to vote “yes” and 46 percent say they’ll vote “no” on Proposition 30, Gov. Jerry Brown’s initiative to raise sales and income taxes.  As Prop. 30’s support slips, there are emerging signs that even California’s Democratic-leaning electorate has grown weary of the state’s tax increases and may be ready for some Wisconsin-like reforms. Adjusted for inflation, California’s government spending increased 42 percent per capita from 2000 to 2010, but the Reason-Rupe poll finds that just 14 percent of likely voters believe California’s government spending over that decade improved the quality of life in the state. In fact, 52 percent say the increase in state spending actually decreased the quality of life and 28 percent feel it made no impact. As a result, 56 percent of Californians favor reducing state government spending to what was spent per capita in 2000 and 25 percent oppose going back to 2000 spending levels. The poll’s sample was made up of 44 percent Democrats, 26 percent Republicans and 24 percent independents. And yet, 62 percent support reducing the number of state government employees, while just 33 percent oppose cutting the state workforce. Fifty-nine percent of those surveyed say government regulations often do more harm than good. And an even higher number, 65 percent of likely voters, believe the laws and regulations passed by the state legislature make it more likely that businesses will move their jobs to other states. Merely 24 percent think the legislature’s actions help create jobs in California. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted October 11-15, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 696 adults in California age 18 or older, including 508 likely voters and 229 cell phone interviews.


Social Media and Political Engagement    Friday, October 19, 2012
The use of social media is becoming a feature of political and civic engagement for many Americans. Some 60% of American adults use either social networking sites like Facebook or Twitter, and a new survey by the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project finds that 66% of those social media users—or 39% of all American adults—have done at least one of eight civic or political activities with social media. These findings come from a nationally representative survey of 2,253 adults ages 18 and older that was conducted between July 16 and August 7, 2012. The survey included 900 interviews on cell phones and was conducted in English and Spanish.These findings come from a nationally representative survey of 2,253 adults ages 18 and older that was conducted between July 16 and August 7, 2012. The survey included 900 interviews on cell phones and was conducted in English and Spanish.

Pew Poll: On Eve of Foreign Debate, Growing Pessimism about Arab Spring Aftermath    Thursday, October 18, 2012
As next week’s third and final presidential debate on foreign policy approaches, a national survey by the Pew Research Center finds increasing public pessimism about developments in the Middle East and more support for tough policies to deal with Iran’s nuclear program and economic issues with China. However, there is no change in the consensus in support for ending U.S. military involvement in Afghanistan. Doubts have spread about the political direction of countries swept up in the Arab Spring protests that began almost two years ago. Nearly six-in-ten Americans (57%) do not believe the changes in the Middle East will lead to lasting improvements for people living in the affected countries, up sharply from 43% in April 2011. And a majority of Americans (54%) continue to say it is more important to have stable governments in the Middle East, even if there is less democracy in the region. Just 30% say democratic governments are more important, even if there is less stability. The public has long favored tough measures to prevent Iran from developing nuclear weapons, and 56% now say it is more important to take a firm stand against Iran’s nuclear program, while 35% say it is more important to avoid a military conflict. In January, 50% favored taking a firm stand against Iran and 41% said it was more important to avoid a confrontation. When it comes to China, 49% of Americans want the U.S. to get tougher with China on economic issues, compared with 42% who say it is more important to build a stronger relationship. In March 2011, the balance of opinion was the reverse: 53% said building a stronger relationship was more important while 40% advocated tougher policies. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted October 4-7, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,511 adults age 18 or older, including 1,201 registered voters and 605 cell phone interviews.

Public Would Accept Tax Hikes in Debt Deal    Wednesday, October 17, 2012
Voters are more likely to embrace tax increases for households making $250,000 or more than cuts to Medicare or other domestic spending, according to the latest United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection Poll. They are also more worried about cuts in entitlement programs than about tax hikes as a part of any deal that policymakers strike to fend off the sequester’s $1.2 trillion in automatic cuts at the start of next year. The public’s opinions are virtually unchanged from similar National Journal polling one year ago when a congressional super committee was facing the same dilemma—make a deal or face automatic cuts. The super committee failed. The cuts are still looming. The only difference between then and now is that the deal-making is slated to occur after the election, which theoretically will shield the negotiators from voter blame for at least two years. Then, as now, just over half of poll respondents (55 percent) said they think that tax rates for families with incomes above $250,000 should increase on Jan. 1 as part of expiring Bush tax cuts or that wealthier families should see a decrease in their itemized deductions (58 percent). Last year, those figures were 53 percent and 55 percent, respectively. About one-third of the most recent poll’s respondents (36 percent) said they are most worried that Medicare or Social Security will be cut as part of a deficit-reduction deal, a much higher percentage than those whose biggest concern is that their personal tax rates will go up (24 percent). Last year, those figures were a similar 38 percent and 23 percent. Women (42 percent) and African-Americans (43 percent) were more likely to be concerned about entitlement cuts than men (29 percent), whites overall (36 percent), or Hispanics (37 percent).The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted October 12-14, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,006 adults age 18 or older, including 401 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: Voters Divided Over Who Will Win Second Debate    Monday, October 15, 2012
On the eve of Tuesday night’s second presidential debate at Hofstra University, voters are divided as to which candidate they think will do the better job: 41% say Obama will do better, while 37% expect Romney to prevail. This stands in stark contrast to expectations prior to the first presidential debate two weeks ago, which voters expected Obama to win by a 51%-29% margin. The latest national survey by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press finds debate expectations for Romney have improved sharply among independents: Two weeks ago more independents thought Obama would win the first debate by a 44% to 28% margin. Today, more independents expect Romney to win the second debate, by a 42% to 31% margin. Expectations for Romney are also up among Republicans (from 64% expecting him to do better than Obama in the first debate to 75% now). Few Democrats (9%) think Romney will do the better job in tomorrow’s debate, but they are less uniformly certain about how Obama will do. Two weeks ago, fully 89% of Democratic voters said they expected Obama to do the better job. That has slipped to 75% of Democrats going into the second debate, as the percentage who do not choose either candidate has about doubled (from 7% to 16%). The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted October 10-12, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,006 adults (857 registered voters) age 18 or older, including 401 cell phone interviews.



Pew Poll: Public Less Negative About Economic News     Thursday, October 11, 2012
Americans are hearing less negative news about the nation’s economy than they were just a month ago, and perceptions of news about other economic sectors – notably, the job situation – have improved as well. Most Americans continue to hear a mix of good and bad news about the economy (62%), but the share hearing mostly bad news has dipped from 35% in September to 28% this month. The percentage hearing mostly good news is essentially unchanged (8%). The latest national survey by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press finds that the percentage hearing mostly bad news about the job situation has declined 10 points since September – from 52% to 42% – and 13 points since August. Most of the interviewing was conducted after the jobs report on Oct. 5, which showed that unemployment had fallen below 8% for the first time since early 2009. The survey also finds fewer Americans are hearing mostly bad news about financial markets, real estate values and food and consumer prices. Last month, far more Americans said news about financial markets was mostly bad than mostly good (37% vs. 14%); 41% said the news about financial markets was mixed. Currently, 26% say news about financial markets is mostly bad while 16% say it is mostly good. The percentage saying the news is a mix of good and bad has increased to 50%. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted October 4-7, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,006 adults age 18 or older, including 405 cell phone interviews.



Pew Poll: Biden Viewed Unfavorably, Divided Opinions about Ryan    Wednesday, October 10, 2012
Ahead of Thursday’s vice presidential debate, more voters view Joe Biden unfavorably than favorably, while opinions about Paul Ryan are more evenly divided. Biden’s image is far less positive than it was shortly before his 2008 debate with Sarah Palin; Ryan is viewed less favorably than Palin was just prior to the last vice-presidential debate. The national survey by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press finds that 39% of voters view Biden favorably, while 51% offer an unfavorable impression of the vice president. Just more than four-in-ten (44%) view Ryan favorably, while about as many (40%) have an unfavorable view. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted Oct. 4-7, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,511 adults age 18 or older, including 1,201 registered voters and 605 cell phone interviews. A separate survey, also conducted Oct. 4-7, among 1,006 adults and 812 registered voters(including 405 cell phone interviews), finds that voters are divided over who will do better in Thursday’s vice presidential debate. Four-in-ten (40%) say Ryan will do a better job while 34% expect Biden to do better. Biden’s image is little changed since September, but he is viewed less favorably than before his faceoff against Palin four years ago. In late September 2008, 53% of voters viewed Biden favorably and just 31% expressed an unfavorable opinion. At the time, Palin’s favorable rating was higher than Ryan’s is today (51% vs. 44%).


Pew Poll: Romney’s Strong Debate Performance Erases Obama’s Lead    Monday, October 08, 2012
Mitt Romney no longer trails Barack Obama in the Pew Research Center’s presidential election polling. By about three-to-one, voters say Romney did a better job than Obama in the Oct. 3 debate, and the Republican is now better regarded on most personal dimensions and on most issues than he was in September. Romney is seen as the candidate who has new ideas and is viewed as better able than Obama to improve the jobs situation and reduce the budget deficit. Fully 66% of registered voters say Romney did the better job in last Wednesday’s debate, compared with just 20% who say Obama did better. A majority (64%) of voters who watched the debate describe it as mostly informative; just 26% say it was mostly confusing. In turn, Romney has drawn even with Obama in the presidential race among registered voters (46% to 46%) after trailing by nine points (42% to 51%) in September. Among likely voters, Romney holds a slight 49% to 45% edge over Obama. He trailed by eight points among likely voters last month. The latest national survey by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press, finds that 67% of Romney’s backers support him strongly, up from 56% last month. For the first time in the campaign, Romney draws as much strong support as does Obama. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted July 26-29, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,511 adults (605 on cell phones) age 18 or older, including 1,201 registered voters and 1,112 likely voters.

Study Finds Broad Wariness Over Online Tracking    Monday, October 08, 2012
As marketers, browser makers and government regulators spar over efforts to let consumers limit custom advertising online, a new study suggests that Americans are largely unaware of what that means and have a strong aversion to being tracked online. The majority of Americans surveyed by researchers at the Berkeley Center for Law and Technology, which is part of the law school at the University of California, Berkeley, do not want information collected at all about which Web sites they visit, according to the study, which is to be released at the Amsterdam Privacy Conference on Monday October 8th. Most of them said they did not find online advertisements useful. And nearly 90 percent said they had never heard of a proposal by the Federal Trade Commission, known as a “do not track” mechanism, that would let users opt out of having their personal data collected for the purposes of serving tailored advertisements. The digital advertising industry has resisted efforts to limit behavioral targeting, pointing out that the free content available on the Internet, including social networks, is powered precisely by that kind of advertising. Browser companies have introduced do-not-track icons for their users, and Microsoft has gone farthest by making it the default setting on its latest version of Internet Explorer. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted January 27 - February 12, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,203 adults age 18 or older, including 525 cell phone interviews.

Obama, Romney Tied Among Likely Voters    Wednesday, October 03, 2012
President Obama and Mitt Romney are deadlocked among likely voters as they prepare to square off in their first presidential debate, according to the latest United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection Poll. The survey showed that voters remain resistant to either Obama or Romney holding full control of the federal government. Obama and Romney each pulled in 47 percent support in the poll among likely voters. It is among the narrowest margins of several presidential surveys published ahead of the debate this week. Other polls have shown the president with a slim lead. In this survey, while the race is tied among likely voters, Obama has a 5-point lead, 49 percent to 44 percent, among registered voters. Romney led in the poll among independents, 49 percent to 41 percent, with both candidates winning more than 90 percent support from their respective parties. The survey had Obama winning 81 percent of the nonwhite vote and Romney carrying 55 percent of white voters The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted Sept. 27-30, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,005 adults age 18 or older, including 402 cell phone interviews.



Pew Poll: Obama Expected to Win First Presidential Debate    Tuesday, October 02, 2012
Heading into Wednesday night’s first presidential debate, voters expect that Barack Obama will do a better job than Mitt Romney. A substantial majority of voters plan to watch the debate: 62% say they are very likely to watch, another 21% say they are somewhat likely. The latest national survey by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press finds that by a 51%-29% margin, more voters say Obama will do better than Romney in Wednesday’s debate. Nearly nine-in-ten Democrats (89%) expect Obama to do the better job in the debate. By contrast, Republicans are less confident in their candidate: 64% say Romney will do the better job, 16% say Obama. The balance of opinion among independent voters mirrors that of all voters: 44% say they expect Obama will do the better job, 28% say Romney. The survey finds that overall interest in the debate is comparable to levels in 2008 and 2004 and higher than in 2000 and in 1996. Currently, 66% of Republican and 64% of Democratic voters say they are very likely to watch the debate; slightly fewer independents (58%) say they are very likely to watch.The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted Sept, 27-30, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,005 adults age 18 or older, including 402 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: Romney's '47%' Comments Criticized, But Many Also Say Overcovered    Monday, October 01, 2012
Mitt Romney’s statement that 47% of the public is dependent on government has registered strongly with voters. Fully two-thirds of voters (67%) correctly identify Romney as the candidate who made the comments. Among those aware that Romney made comments about the “47%”, more than half (55%) have a negative reaction while just 23% react positively. The latest national survey by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press finds that large percentages of Republican (65%), Democratic (65%) and independent voters (72%) know that Romney described nearly half of the population as dependent on government and paying no taxes. The reaction among those aware that Romney made the comments is clearly negative. Yet they also think that news organizations are giving too much coverage to Romney’s “47%” statement. Nearly half of voters (49%) who know that Romney made those remarks say news organizations are giving the story too much coverage, while just 13% say they are giving it too little coverage; 28% say the amount of coverage has been appropriate. The survey also finds that, more generally, voters are not too impressed with the jobs both candidates done in attempting to win them over. Only about half of voters give Barack Obama grades of A or B in convincing them to vote for him. Even fewer voters give Romney grades of A or B for persuasiveness. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted Sept, 27-30, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,005 adults age 18 or older, including 402 cell phone interviews.



Kaiser Health Tracking Poll: September 2012    Thursday, September 27, 2012
The September poll finds with the November election fast-approaching, Medicare trails only the economy and the federal budget deficit as key priorities for voters, and interest in the federal health program is even higher among seniors. More than a third (36%) of Americans say Medicare is “extremely” important to their vote in the election, compared to 49 percent who describe the economy in such terms and 41 percent who say so about the federal budget deficit. For seniors, Medicare pulls nearly even with the economy as an issue, with 46 percent branding Medicare extremely important to their vote and 51 percent saying the economy is extremely important.  Democrats are much more likely to say Medicare is an extremely important factor in their presidential pick, while for Republicans the federal budget deficit is about equal to the economy as their top concern. Even though the Affordable Care Act (ACA) has been the focus of partisan political and legal battles for more than two years, it ties for fourth (with Medicaid and spending on the military) on the list of priorities among the ten issues asked about for all respondents, with 30 percent saying each is extremely important to their vote. The ACA ranked sixth among seniors, picked by 32 percent as extremely important to their vote. The poll finds that a majority Americans do not embrace shifting the Medicare program toward a premium support model at this time.   Fifty-five percent prefer that Medicare continue as it is today, while 37 percent favor a premium support (or defined contribution) system with a traditional Medicare option of the sort called for by Republican presidential nominee Governor Mitt Romney and his running mate, Representative Paul Ryan. Support for the status quo is stronger among those 55 and older -- two-thirds of whom want to keep Medicare as it is -- even though Gov. Romney has emphasized in his campaign that this group would not be affected by his proposal. Among adults under 55, half favor the current system and 44 percent favor a defined contribution system. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted September 13-19, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,534 adults age 18 or older, including 501 cell phone interviews.


Pew Poll: Pluralities Say Press is Fair to Romney, Obama    Tuesday, September 25, 2012
There is no public consensus when it comes to how the presidential candidates are being covered by the news media. Nearly half (46%) say the coverage of Romney has been fair, while among those who see a bias as many say the press has been too easy on the GOP nominee (20%) as too tough on him (21%). The same percentage (46%) says coverage of Obama has also been fair. However, nearly twice as many say press coverage of the president has been too easy (28%) than too tough (15%). Four years ago, there was a larger disparity in impressions of how the press was covering the candidates. In October 2008 more thought the press was being too tough on McCain (23%) than too easy (15%). Nearly a third (31%) said the press was being too easy on Obama, while just 7% said it was being too tough. At that time, just 38% said coverage of Sarah Palin was fair; as many (38%) said coverage was too tough. Republicans generally are more critical of the press than are Democrats. The new survey by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press finds, 45% of Republicans think the press has been too tough on Mitt Romney – almost identical to the 44% who said this about coverage of McCain in October 2008. By comparison, 26% of Democrats think the press is too tough on Obama, though this has increased substantially from only 9% four years ago. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted September 20 – 23, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,005 adults age 18 or older, including 400 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: For Voters It's Still the Economy    Monday, September 24, 2012
As Barack Obama and Mitt Romney prepare for their first debate on Oct. 3, the issues at the top of the voters’ agenda have changed little since 2008. Fully 87% of registered voters say that the economy will be very important to their vote, while 83% say jobs will be very important to their vote. Four years ago, the economy also was the top priority for voters. In August 2008, an identical 87% said the economy was very important to their vote, and in October 2008, 80% rated jobs as very important. However, the latest national survey by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press, finds that several other issues have declined in importance since 2008. Most notably, energy policy rated among the most important electoral issues in 2008 – 77% said it was very important to their vote. Today it ranks near the bottom of the voting priorities list at 55%. Terrorism also has declined as a voting priority. Currently, 60% of voters say the issue of terrorism will be very important to their vote, down from 72% in August 2008. Immigration is also less of a focus in 2012. In the new survey, 41% view the issue of immigration as very important – the lowest of 12 issues tested – compared with 52% in August 2008. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted September 12-16, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 3,019 adults age 18 or older, including 2,424 registered voters and 1,213 cell phone interviews and.


Obama Leads Romney 52-45 In New Reason-Rupe Poll; In Three-Way Race Obama Leads Romney 49-42, Johnson Gets 6 Percent    Friday, September 21, 2012
A new national Reason-Rupe poll of likely voters finds President Barack Obama leading Republican Mitt Romney 48 percent to 43 percent in the presidential race. When undecided voters are asked which way they are leaning Obama’s lead over Romney grows to 52-45. President Obama holds large advantages among women (53-37), African-Americans (92-2) and Hispanics (71-18). Fifty-two percent of likely voters view Obama favorably, while 45 view him unfavorably. In contrast, 49 percent of likely voters have an unfavorable view of Mitt Romney and 41 percent have a favorable view of him. In a three-way presidential race, 49 percent of likely voters back Obama and Romney falls to 42 percent as the Libertarian Party’s Gary Johnson gets six percent of support. Johnson is already on the presidential ballot in 47 states. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted September 13-17, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 3,019 adults age 18 or older, including 787 likely voters and 404 cell phone interviews and.


No love for Mitt in Mass.    Thursday, September 20, 2012
Massachusetts voters have turned against Mitt Romney with a vengeance, leaving the former governor a political pariah in his own home state, according to a new UMass Lowell/Boston Herald poll. Sixty percent of Bay State voters now have an unfavorable view of Romney, and the GOP nominee is headed for a Bay State drubbing in the November election, the poll of 524 registered voters shows. Just 35 percent of voters say they plan to vote for the Romney/Ryan ticket, while 60 percent say they are backing President Obama. That margin is roughly the same as the 2008 election, when Obama trounced Arizona Sen. John McCain. Romney’s standing in Massachusetts has plummeted in just the last nine months, according to the poll. In a University of Massachusetts at Lowell/Herald poll last December, Romney was viewed favorably by 40 percent of Bay State voters and unfavorably by 48 percent. But the campaign apparently has taken a toll on the Republican nominee on his home turf. Obama’s popularity, meanwhile, has not changed in the past year, the poll shows. In the new survey, Obama is viewed favorably by 60 percent of voters, with just 34 percent viewing him unfavorably. Those numbers are virtually the same as the UMass Lowell poll last December.The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted September 16-19, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 687 adults age 18 or older, including 288 cell phone interviews.

Scott Brown in slight lead vs. Warren    Thursday, September 20, 2012
U.S. Sen. Scott Brown has moved into a narrow lead over rival Elizabeth Warren while his standing among Massachusetts voters has improved despite a year-long Democratic assault, a new UMass Lowell/Boston Herald poll shows. The GOP incumbent is beating Warren by a 50-44 percent margin among registered Bay State voters, a turnaround from the last University of Massachusetts Lowell/Herald poll nine months ago that had the Democratic challenger leading by seven points. Among likely voters, Brown is leading the Harvard Law professor by a 49-45 percent margin, just within the poll’s 5.5 percent margin of error. “I wasn’t too sure of him at first, but he’s been very independent,” said Jo Ann Dunnigan, a longtime Democrat and President Obama supporter from Fall River who participated in the poll. Brown and Warren face off Oct. 1 in a debate sponsored by the Herald and UMass Lowell. The poll shows nearly one in three Brown backers say they could change their mind before Election Day, compared to just 19 percent for Warren. But the poll, which started a week after the Democratic National Convention, finds no evidence of a “bounce” for Warren. There also is some troubling news for the well-financed Warren campaign. Despite spending millions of dollars to tarnish Brown’s image, the GOP incumbent’s popularity has actually increased in the past nine months. Brown is now viewed favorably by 57 percent of registered voters, up nine points from a UMass Lowell/Boston Herald poll conducted in December 2011. Brown’s unfavorable rating actually has dropped six points to 29 percent. He is also drawing 22 percent of voters who say they will vote for President Obama. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted September 16-19, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 687 adults age 18 or older, including 288 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: Obama Ahead with Stronger Support, Better Image and Lead on Most Issues    Wednesday, September 19, 2012

At this stage in the campaign, Barack Obama is in a strong position compared with past victorious presidential candidates. With an eight-point lead over Mitt Romney among likely voters, Obama holds a bigger September lead than the last three candidates who went on to win in November, including Obama four years ago. In elections since 1988, only Bill Clinton, in 1992 and 1996, entered the fall with a larger advantage. Not only does Obama enjoy a substantial lead in the horserace, he tops Romney on a number of key dimensions. His support is stronger than his rival’s, and is positive rather than negative. Mitt Romney’s backers are more ardent than they were pre-convention, but are still not as enthusiastic as Obama’s. Roughly half of Romney’s supporters say they are voting against Obama rather than for the Republican nominee. With the exception of Bill Clinton in 1992, candidates lacking mostly positive backing have lost in November. The latest national survey by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press finds that Obama continues to be the more likable candidate by a substantial margin; his favorability rating has risen to 55% from 50% in late July, with 42% now expressing an unfavorable view of him. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted September 12-16, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 3019 adults age 18 or older, including 2,424 registered voters and 1,213 cell phone interviews.


Pew Poll: Democrats Now More Positive on Campaign 2012    Wednesday, September 12, 2012

In the wake of the party conventions, Democrats express increasingly positive views of the presidential campaign. And today, substantially more Democrats than Republicans view the campaign as interesting and informative. The latest national survey by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press finds that 66% of Democrats say the presidential campaign is interesting while just 27% say it is dull. Among Republicans 50% say it is interesting while nearly as many (45%) describe it as dull. The gap is about as wide in opinions about whether the presidential campaign is informative – 68% of Democrats say it is informative, compared with 49% of Republicans. In September 2008, nearly identical percentages of Republicans (75%) and Democrats (74%) said the campaign was interesting. And similar majorities of both groups viewed the campaign as informative (62% of Republicans and 59% of Democrats). Republicans also are more likely than Democrats to say the current campaign is too negative. More than six-in-ten Republicans (63%) say it is too negative; just 42% of Democrats express this view. In September 2008, 41% of Republicans and 45% of Democrats said the campaign was too negative. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted September 7-9, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,012 adults age 18 or older, including 408 cell phone interviews.


Americans Wary of Changes to Medicare    Tuesday, September 11, 2012

President Obama and Democrats maintain a sizable political advantage on the hot-button issue of Medicare, according to a new poll. The latest United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection Poll also shows plurality support for the much-maligned economic-stimulus package that was pushed through by Democrats at the start of Obama’s presidency, as well as sharp divisions among different ethnic groups on questions about both the president’s health care law and Medicare. It is Medicare that has been thrust to the center of political debate since GOP presidential nominee Mitt Romney tapped Rep. Paul Ryan, the architect of a Medicare overhaul plan, as his running mate. At every turn, Democrats are now accusing the GOP ticket of wanting to turn Medicare into a “voucher” program. The poll helps explain why Democrats would use the term that Republicans emphatically reject: 54 percent of Americans in the survey said they trust Obama and congressional Democrats more to manage the financial health of Medicare, which provides health care to seniors. Only 31 percent said they trusted Romney and the GOP more. Independents, a crucial voting bloc in November, gave Democrats their trust on the issue by a 22-point margin, 49 percent to 27 percent. The greater level of trust in Democrats extended across all income and education levels. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted September 7-9, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,012 adults age 18 or older, including 408 cell phone interviews.


Pew Poll: Democratic Convention Highlights: Clinton Outshines Obama    Tuesday, September 11, 2012
Like Mitt Romney, Barack Obama was not the highlight of his party’s convention. Among those who watched at least a little coverage of the Democratic convention, 29% say the highlight was Bill Clinton’s speech, while 16% name Obama’s speech as the highlight. About as many (15%) say that first lady Michelle Obama’s speech was the highlight of the convention. The latest survey by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press finds that while Obama’s speech was not the highlight of the convention, it is evaluated more positively than Romney’s convention address. Six-in-ten (60%) of those who watched at least a little convention coverage rate Obama’s speech as excellent or good; that compares with 53% of GOP convention watchers who rated Romney’s speech positively. However, Obama’s speech was not viewed nearly as positively as his address at the convention four years ago: 73% said that speech was excellent or good. In 2008, 42% of convention watchers rated Obama’s speech as excellent, compared with 29% who rate it that highly today. While Obama’s speech was overshadowed by Clinton’s, Romney shared the spotlight with actor Clint Eastwood. About as many said Eastwood’s speech was the highlight of the GOP convention as mentioned Romney’s speech. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted September 7-9, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,012 adults age 18 or older, including 408 cell phone interviews.

Medicare Views Raise Warning Signs for Both Parties    Monday, September 10, 2012
With less than two months to go before Election Day, Americans are expressing concern about the viability of the Medicare system, a leading Republican plan to reform it, and whether President Obama’s health care plan will help them. This dour tableau affecting both parties is laid out in the latest edition of the United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection Poll. A full 68 percent of respondents strongly or somewhat agreed with the proposition that “the Medicare program is running out of money and will have to change if it is to survive.” Respondents were slightly more optimistic when asked if “Medicare will pay enough benefits when I get older to cover all or most of my health care needs.” Fifty percent agreed with that statement, while 46 percent did not, and 4 percent refused to answer.The survey revealed skepticism for the so-called Ryan plan to reform Medicare, crafted by Republican vice presidential nominee Paul Ryan. Respondents were asked which comes closer to their own view on Medicare: whether it should “continue as it is today” with the government “providing health insurance and paying doctors and hospitals directly,” or whether it should it be a system where the government “provides seniors with a fixed sum that they could use either to purchase private health insurance or to pay the cost of remaining in the current Medicare plan.” A whopping 67 percent of respondents wanted to stick with the original Medicare program, while only 27 percent were sympathetic to the Ryan-style plan.The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted September 7-9, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,012 adults age 18 or older, including 408 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: Obama in a Word: From ‘Inexperienced’ and ‘Change’ to ‘Good’ and ‘Trying’    Thursday, September 06, 2012
Four years ago, voters’ descriptions of Barack Obama focused on his newness on the political scene. In September 2008, more voters used the word inexperienced to describe Obama than any other word, while change was the most frequently used positive term. Words like young, charismatic and new were also among the top descriptions. Today, the public’s one-word descriptions for Obama reflect the mixed views of his presidency. The top positive words are good and trying, while the most frequently used negative descriptions are failure and incompetent.  The latest national survey by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press and the Washington Post finds that some perceptions of Obama have endured over the years. Four years ago, intelligent was among the most frequent descriptions. It has remained a constant in one-word surveys on Obama since then. Currently, 17 of respondents describe Obama as intelligent; two months before the 2008 election, 20 people said Obama was intelligent.  The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted August 31st to September 3rd, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,008 adults age 18 or older, including 402 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: Biden in a Word: ‘Good,’ ‘Idiot’    Wednesday, September 05, 2012

Asked for their one-word impression of Joe Biden, more people use negative than positive words to describe the vice president. Many of the negative words disparage Biden’s competence and performance, with idiot, incompetent and clown among the terms used most frequently. Of those offering a word to describe Biden, 38% use negative terms, while 23% give positive words. About four-in-ten (39%) use neutral terms, with vice president among the most common. The top positive words used to describe Biden are good and honest. Many of the negative words focus on Biden’s intelligence: Aside from clown, a number of people describe Biden as stupid, a joke, goofy and a buffoon. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted July 26-29, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,008 adults age 18 or older, including 406 cell phone interviews.


Pew Poll: RNC Highlights: Romney Shares Top Billing With Eastwood    Wednesday, September 05, 2012
The public paid far less attention to this year’s Republican convention than it did to the GOP convention four years ago. Just 37% say they watched all or some of the Republican convention, down from 56% in 2008. And while there has been a modest increase in the percentage saying they view Mitt Romney more favorably in the wake of the convention, his acceptance speech was not the highlight of the event: As many of those who watched at least a little convention coverage cited Clint Eastwood’s speech as the convention highlight (20%) as named Romney’s speech (17%). One-in-five say there was no convention highlight, about the same percentage as four years ago. The latest national survey by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Pressfinds that even among Republicans Romney’s speech was not the standout event of the convention. A quarter of Republican convention-watchers (25%) said Romney’s speech was the highlight, 19% named Eastwood’s performance, 15% named Paul Ryan’s speech and 13% cited Ann Romney’s address. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted August 31st to September 1st, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,008 adults age 18 or older, including 402 cell phone interviews.



Privacy and Data Management on Mobile Devices    Wednesday, September 05, 2012
More than half of mobile application users have uninstalled or avoided certain apps due to concerns about the way personal information is shared or collected by the app, according to a nationally representative telephone survey conducted by the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project. The results reported here come from a nationwide survey of 2,254 adults (age 18 and older) between March 15-April 3, 2012, including interviews on landline and cell phones and conducted in English and Spanish.

Politics on Social Networking Sites    Tuesday, September 04, 2012

A portion of social networking site users say the sites are important for some of their political activities and the way they decide how to engage with campaigns and issues. At the same time, most users of the sites say they do not use the sites for political purposes or debates. This from a nationally representative phone survey by the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project conducted from January 20-February 19, 2012 among 2,253 adults ages 18 and older. Interviews were conducted in English and Spanish.



Pew Poll: Romney in a Word: 'Honest,' 'Businessman,' 'Rich'    Thursday, August 30, 2012
As the American public has learned more about Mitt Romney over the course of the past year, his image has changed substantially. Last fall, the one word that came to mind most frequently when people were asked to describe Romney was Mormon. The same question this spring elicited the words rich and no more frequently than any other. While Romney’s wealth remains a defining feature, today it is joined by the words honest and businessman, two terms that were offered by relatively few as recently as March. The new national survey finds that while many people are now using different words to describe Romney, the words remain on balance more negative than positive. Romney elicits far more positive reactions from Republicans now than in the spring, but both Democrats and independents continue to say more negative than positive things about him. Overall, 42% of the words volunteered by respondents are clearly negative, most commonly liar, arrogant, crook, out of touch, distrust and fake. Fewer (28%) offer words that are clearly positive in tone, such as honest, good, leadership, and capable. The remaining 30% of words are more descriptive and neutral in their tone, including businessman, rich, conservative, and Republican. As the campaign progresses, fewer Americans are offering neutral descriptions of Romney, but people continue to have more negative than positive things to say about him.The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted July 23-26, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,010 adults age 18 or older, including 407 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: Paul Ryan in a Word: 'Conservative,' 'Intelligent'    Wednesday, August 29, 2012
As Paul Ryan prepares to accept his nomination as the GOP’s vice presidential candidate, the American public has a mixed impression of him. When asked what one word comes to mind when thinking about Ryan, the most frequent responses are conservative, intelligent, good, unknown, and young. In the latest national survey by the Pew Research Center and the Washington Postpeople offer a roughly equal number of positive and negative descriptions. Of those offering a word, 37% describe Ryan in clearly positive terms, using such words as intelligent, good, energetic , honest and smart. Another 35% of the words used are clearly negative in tone, such as idiot, extreme, phony and scary. The remaining 28% of the descriptions were not clearly positive or negative, such as conservative, unknown and young. Not surprisingly, most Republicans offer positive words in describing Ryan, while most Democrats volunteer negative words. Among Republicans who volunteered a description, 69% offer positive words, most commonly intelligent, good and honest. Another 27% of Republicans offer neutral words, including young and conservative, while just 4% offer a negative description. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted July 23-26, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,010 adults age 18 or older, including 407 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: More Interest in GOP Platform than Romney's Speech    Monday, August 27, 2012
As the Republican convention gets underway, more Americans express interest in learning about what’s in the GOP platform than in the speeches by either Mitt Romney or his running mate. About half of the public (52%) is interested in learning about the Republican Party’s platform, while 44% are interested in Romney’s acceptance speech and about the same percentage (46%) in Ryan’s convention speech. The latest survey finds overall interest in the Republican convention is comparable to the past two GOP conventions. More than four-in-ten (44%) say they are very or fairly interested in following what happens in Tampa over the next three days, compared with 48% on the eve of the 2008 GOP convention, and 46% in 2004. This is almost identical to the level of public interest in next week’s Democratic convention in Charlotte; 43% say they are interested in what happens at that convention. This is down significantly from the notably high interest in the Democratic convention four years ago, when 59% were very or fairly interested. In terms of advance interest in events at the Democratic convention, 55% say they are interested in learning about the Democratic platform, while nearly as many express interest in Barack Obama’s acceptance speech (51%) and Bill Clinton’s convention speech (52%). The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted August 23-26, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,010 adults age 18 or older, including 407 cell phone interviews.

Medicare Voucher Plan Remains Unpopular    Tuesday, August 21, 2012
Paul Ryan’s selection to the Republican ticket has put the issue of Medicare squarely on the 2012 campaign agenda. And the latest Pew Research Center survey continues to find the public is aware of a proposal to gradually shift Medicare to a system of vouchers and is, on balance, more opposed than supportive of the idea. The survey finds 72% have heard a lot or a little about a proposal to change Medicare into a program that would give future participants a credit toward purchasing private health insurance coverage. And among those who are aware, the idea remains unpopular; by a 49% to 34% margin more oppose than favor the idea. This is virtually unchanged from public reactions a little over a year ago, when Republicans in the House voted in favor of this proposal as part of the “Ryan plan.” More generally, while surveys consistently find that dealing with the deficit is a high priority for Americans, there is little support for doing so if it means entitlement cuts. When asked whether it is more important to reduce the budget deficit or to keep Social Security and Medicare benefits as they are, Americans continue to prioritize maintaining benefits.The public offers a relatively negative assessment of Mitt Romney’s selection of Ryan as his running mate. Nearly half (46%) say Ryan is an only fair or poor choice, while 28% say he is an excellent or good choice. By comparison, reactions to John Kerry’s selection of John Edwards in 2004, and Bill Clinton’s selection of Al Gore in 1992, were more positive than negative. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted August 16-19, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,005 adults age 18 or older, including 401 cell phone interviews.

As GOP Gears Up For Its National Convention, the Affordable Care Act Ranks Below Medicare, Cost of Care Among Top Health Care Priorities For Republicans    Thursday, August 16, 2012
As Republican delegates prepare to meet in Tampa for the party’s nominating convention later this month, two new Kaiser polls shed light on the priorities and policy positions of their fellow partisans nationwide. Despite the ongoing focus on the GOP’s opposition to the 2010 health care law, Kaiser’s August Health Tracking Poll suggests that the Affordable Care Act (ACA) isn’t Republicans’ top health care priority, with larger shares mentioning Medicare and the cost of health care and coverage as being important to their vote. And when it comes to Medicare, as has been widely reported, a new Washington Post/Kaiser survey—fielded before the
announcement that Representative Paul Ryan (R‐WI) would join Governor Mitt Romney at the top of the Republican ticket—finds that even a majority of Republicans (55 percent) prefer the idea of keeping Medicare’s status quo rather than changing to a system in which seniors are guaranteed a fixed amount of money that could be used to purchase coverage from a private plan. Even though over four in ten Republicans (44 percent) say they don’t yet have a “basic understanding” of what Governor Mitt Romney is proposing to do on health care if elected, a majority believe his approach to health care would be different than that of President Barack
Obama, and most trust him to make the right decisions about the future of the ACA. The two surveys also shed light on the often, but not always, contrasting views of Democrats as they prepare for their own convention next month, as well as measuring familiarity with two of the most recently implemented provisions of the 2010 health care law. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted August 7-12, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,208 adults age 18 or older, including 506 cell phone interviews.


Pew Poll: Further Decline in Credibility Ratings for Most News Organizations    Thursday, August 16, 2012
For the second time in a decade, the believability ratings for major news organizations have suffered broad-based declines. In the new survey, positive believability ratings have fallen significantly for nine of 13 news organizations tested. This follows a similar downturn in positive believability ratings that occurred between 2002 and 2004. The falloff in credibility affects news organizations in most sectors: national newspapers, such as the New York Times and USA Today, all three cable news outlets, as well as the broadcast TV networks and NPR. Across all 13 news organizations included in the survey, the average positive believability rating (3 or 4 on a 4-point scale) is 56%. In 2010, the average positive rating was 62%. A decade ago, the average rating for the news organizations tested was 71%. Since 2002, every news outlet’s believability rating has suffered a double-digit drop, except for local daily newspapers and local TV news. The New York Times was not included in this survey until 2004, but its believability rating has fallen by 13 points since then. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted July 19-22, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,001 adults age 18 or older, including 401 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: Eight-in-Ten Following Olympics on TV or Digitally    Monday, August 06, 2012
Large majorities of Americans are following coverage of the Olympic Games in London. Nearly eight-in-ten (78%) say they have watched or followed Olympic coverage either on television, online or on social networks. Television remains far-and-away the leading platform for Olympic coverage; 73% say they have watched coverage on television. Still, 17% say they have watched online or digitally and 12% report they have followed Olympic coverage on social networking sites like Facebook or Twitter. Most Olympic followers (68%) say they are watching events in the evening after they have already occurred. At the same time, almost a quarter (23%) say they are watching live during the day. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted Aug 2-5, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,005 adults age 18 or older, including 405 cell phone interviews.

Mobile Phone Problems    Thursday, August 02, 2012
Even though mobile technology often simplifies the completion of everyday tasks, cell phone owners can also encounter technical glitches and unwanted intrusions on their phones. In an April 2012 survey, the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project assessed the prevalence of four problems that cell owners might face. The results in this report are based on data from telephone interviews conducted by Princeton Survey Research Associates International from March 15 to April 3, 2012, among a sample of 2,254 adults, age 18 and older. Telephone interviews were conducted in English and Spanish by landline and cell phone.

Pew Poll: Romney's Personal Image Remains Negative    Thursday, August 02, 2012
By a 52% to 37% margin, more voters say they have an unfavorable than favorable view of Mitt Romney. The poll, conducted prior to Romney’s recent overseas trip, represents the sixth consecutive survey over the past nine months in which his image has been in negative territory. While Romney’s personal favorability improved substantially between March and June – as Republican voters rallied behind him after the primary season ended– his image has again slipped over the past month. Barack Obama’s image remains, by comparison, more positive – 50% offer a favorable assessment of the president, 45% an unfavorable one. Even so, Obama’s personal ratings are lower than most presidential candidates in recent elections. A review of final pre-election surveys of voters since 1988 finds that all candidates enjoyed considerably higher personal ratings going into the final days of their campaigns than does Mitt Romney currently. In fact, only three, Michael Dukakis in 1988, George H.W. Bush in 1992 and Bob Dole in 1996, were not rated favorably by a majority of voters. Obama’s current ratings also are lower than the pre-election ratings of most other recent presidential candidates. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted July 16-26, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 2,508 adults age 18 or older, including 1,956 registered voters.

Pew Poll: Two-Thirds of Democrats Now Support Gay Marriage    Tuesday, July 31, 2012
Reports that the Democratic Party may add support for gay marriage to its party platform are in keeping with a significant shift of opinion on this issue among Democrats nationwide. Just four years ago, in 2008, only half (50%) of Democrats favored allowing gays and lesbians to marry legally, while 42% were opposed. Support for gay marriage among Democrats has jumped to 65% today, more than double the percentage that is opposed (29%). Independent support for gay marriage has grown substantially since 2008. More independents today favor (51%) than oppose (40%) gay marriage; four years ago independents were divided evenly (44% favor, 45% oppose). While President Obama’s endorsement of gay marriage earlier this year drew significant news coverage and public interest, its effect on public opinion has been limited. Two consecutive national surveys conducted since May 9, when Obama made his announcement, show 48% in favor of allowing gay marriage and 44% opposed. This is virtually unchanged from a survey conducted in April, before the president’s statement. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted June 28th to July 9th, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 2,973 adults age 18 or older.

Pew Poll: Views on Gun Laws Unchanged After Aurora Shooting    Monday, July 30, 2012
There has been no significant change in public views on the issue of gun control and gun rights following the July 20th shooting at a movie theater in Aurora, Colorado. Currently, 47% say it is more important to control gun ownership, while 46% say it is more important to protect the rights of Americans to own guns. That is virtually unchanged from a survey earlier this year in April, when 45% prioritized gun control and 49% gun rights. Other recent major shootings also had little effect on public opinion about gun laws. There was no significant change in the balance of opinion about gun rights and gun control after the January, 2011 shooting in Tucson, Arizona in which Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords was injured. Nor was there a spike in support for gun control following the shooting at Virginia Tech University in April, 2007. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted July 26-29, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,010 adults age 18 or older, including 401 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: Little Voter Discomfort with Romney’s Mormon Religion    Thursday, July 26, 2012
Most voters continue to say it is important for a president to have strong religious beliefs. But voters have limited awareness of the religious faiths of both Mitt Romney and Barack Obama. And there is little evidence to suggest that concerns about the candidates’ respective faiths will have a meaningful impact in the fall elections. The vast majority of those who are aware of Romney’s faith say it doesn’t concern them. Fully eight-in-ten voters who know Romney is Mormon say they are either comfortable with his faith (60%) or that it doesn’t matter to them (21%). Along religious lines, white evangelical Protestants and black Protestants, on the one hand, and atheists and agnostics on the other, are the most likely to say they are uncomfortable with Romney’s faith. Yet unease with Romney’s religion has little impact on voting preferences. Republicans and white evangelicals overwhelmingly back Romney irrespective of their views of his faith, and Democrats and seculars overwhelmingly oppose him regardless of their impression. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted June 28th to July 9th, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 2,373 adults age 18 or older, including 1,492 cell phone interview

Poll Shows Tough Landscape for Incumbents    Wednesday, July 25, 2012
A strong plurality of Americans are seeking members of Congress who are more willing to compromise, but that impulse, so far at least, has not redounded to the benefit of either Mitt Romney or President Obama, according to the latest United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection Poll. When asked whether they would be more or less likely to vote for a congressional candidate who “would make compromises with people he or she disagrees with,” a full 43 percent of respondents said they would be more likely to vote for that candidate, while only 20 percent said they would be less likely. Some 34 percent said that it would make no difference. By contrast, back in May 2010, only 30 percent said that ability to compromise would make a difference in how they decided to vote. That’s a 13-percentage-point increase over the last two years. When asked about the presidential race and reaching agreement with members of the other party in Congress, Americans gave higher marks to Obama. Forty-three percent said he would do a better job reaching agreement with the other party, versus 33 percent for Romney.The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted July 19-22, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,001 adults age 18 or older, including 401 cell phone interviews.  

Many Families Struggle to Make Ends Meet, But Those With a Financial Plan Feel and Do Better    Tuesday, July 24, 2012
The recent recession has left many American families struggling to make ends meet and to save for the future, according to a 60-page report released today by Consumer Federation of America (CFA) and Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards, Inc. (CFP Board). At the same time, the survey shows that those who have prepared a personal financial plan feel more confident and report more success managing money, savings and investments than those who have not. Nearly two-fifths (38%) of the 1,508 household financial decision-makers surveyed said they live paycheck to paycheck, while less than one-third (30%) indicated they felt comfortable financially and only about one-third (34%) think they can afford to retire by age 65. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted May 7-20, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,508 adults age 18 or older, including 602 cell phone interviews.

Public to Congress: Bend, Don’t Break    Tuesday, July 24, 2012
Most Americans see conflict between the parties as the central reason Washington has not produced a more productive response to the persistent economic slowdown, but remain pessimistic that the two sides will reach effective agreements more often after the November election, according to the latest United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection Poll. When it comes to compromise in Congress, it appears that absence has made Americans’ hearts grow fonder: Compared with 2010, the survey found a notable uptick in the share of Americans who said they prefer political leaders who “make compromises with people they disagree with” over those who “stick to their positions without compromising.” But the survey found that the public remains dubious that Congress will heed that advice: Only 27 percent of those polled said they believed that after the 2012 election “the two parties will come together more than they have in recent years to try to solve the most important problems facing the nation.” A resounding 63 percent instead predicted that “the two parties will mostly disagree and reach stalemate on the most important problems facing the nation, as they often have in recent years.” The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted July 19-22, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,001 adults age 18 or older, including 401 cell phone interviews.

The Rise of the “Connected Viewer”    Tuesday, July 17, 2012
Half of all adult cell phone owners now incorporate their mobile devices into their television watching experiences. These “connected viewers” used their cell phones for a wide range of activities during the 30 days preceding the Pew Internet Project's April 2012 survey. The results in this report are based on data from telephone interviews conducted by Princeton Survey Research Associates International from March 15 to April 3, 2012, among a sample of 2,254 adults, age 18 and older. Telephone interviews were conducted in English and Spanish The results in this report are based on data from telephone interviews conducted by Princeton Survey Research Associates International from March 15 to April 3, 2012, among a sample of 2,254 adults, age 18 and older. Telephone interviews were conducted in English and Spanish by landline and cell phone.

Family Caregivers Online    Thursday, July 12, 2012
Thirty percent of U.S. adults help a loved one with personal needs or household chores, managing finances, arranging for outside services, or visiting regularly to see how they are doing. Most are caring for an adult, such as a parent or spouse, but a small group cares for a child living with a disability or long-term health issue. This report is the result of collaboration between the Pew Internet Project and the California HealthCare Foundation. This report is the result of collaboration between the Pew Internet Project and the California HealthCare Foundation. All numerical results in this report are based on data from telephone interviews conducted by Princeton Survey Research Associates International between August 9 and September 13, 2010, among a sample of 3,001 adults, age 18 and older. Interviews were conducted in English and SpanishAll numerical results in this report are based on data from telephone interviews conducted by Princeton Survey Research Associates International between August 9 and September 13, 2010, among a sample of 3,001 adults, age 18 and older. Interviews were conducted in English and Spanish.

Pew Poll: Obama Holds Lead; Romney Trails on Most Issues    Thursday, July 12, 2012
Despite the stagnant economy and broad dissatisfaction with national conditions, Barack Obama holds a significant lead over Mitt Romney. Currently, Obama is favored by a 50% to 43% margin among registered voters nationwide. Obama has led by at least a slim margin in every poll this year, and there is no clear trend in either candidate’s support since Romney wrapped up the GOP nomination.The Supreme Court’s recent ruling on the 2010 Affordable Care Act appears to have had little effect on the 2012 race. But the decision has had a substantial impact on views of the court itself. About half of Americans (51%) express a favorable opinion of the court, while 37% have an unfavorable view, up eight points since April and the highest percentage expressing an unfavorable opinion in a trend dating to 1985. The more negative view of the court is largely being driven by Republicans: Three months ago, Republicans viewed the Supreme Court favorably by a 56% to 25% margin. Today, they view the court unfavorably by a 51% to 38% margin. The presidential campaign’s dynamics have changed little in recent months, despite the court’s high-profile health care ruling, a series of subpar job reports and increased campaign activity on the part of both candidates. Independent voters remain evenly divided, 46% support Romney while 45% back Obama. Nearly identical majorities of Democrats (88%) and Republicans (89%) support their party’s candidate. Obama’s lead arises from the Democratic Party’s continuing advantage in party identification among registered voters. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted June 28th to July 9th, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 2,973 adults age 18 or older, including 1202 cell phone interviews.

Privacy Trumps Cybersecurity, Poll Shows    Wednesday, July 11, 2012
Proposals to increase cybersecurity by allowing businesses and government to share information may enjoy bipartisan support in Washington, but Americans aren’t sold on the idea, the latest United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection Poll finds.
Almost two-thirds of respondents—63 percent—said government and businesses should not be allowed to share information because it would hurt privacy and civil liberties. But 29 percent of those surveyed said information-sharing should be allowed to better protect computer networks. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted July 5-8, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,004 adults age 18 or older, including 403 cell phone interviews.


Americans Prefer Obama’s Tax Cut Plan    Tuesday, July 10, 2012
Americans think it is more important to extend the Bush-era tax cuts for families earning less than $250,000 a year, as President Obama proposed on Monday, than extending them for all taxpayers, as advocated by congressional Republicans and presumptive GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney, according to a new United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection Poll. The public also favors Democrats’ plan to create jobs through additional spending on infrastructure and retaining public-sector employees over the Republican plan to cut taxes for businesses. Presented with a list of five legislative priorities, Americans continue to say that “new federal spending to try to create jobs by rehabilitating public schools, improving roads and mass transit, and preventing layoffs of teachers, police officers, and other first responders”—the spending proposal offered by the Obama administration and congressional Democrats to boost employment and the overall economy—is the most important thing Congress can do before the end of year. But the GOP proposals, such as business-tax cuts and repealing the 2010 health care law, also score fairly well with the public; roughly half say it is “very important” for Congress to reach agreement on those initiatives before the end of 2012. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted July 5-8, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,004 adults age 18 or older, including 403 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: Division, Uncertainty over Court's Health Care Ruling    Tuesday, July 03, 2012
The public has long been divided in its opinions about the 2010 health care law. There is now a similar division of opinion over last week’s Supreme Court decision to uphold the law – 40% say they disapprove of the decision, while 36% approve and nearly a quarter (24%) offer no opinion. Despite extensive public interest in the court’s ruling, just 55% of the public knows that the Supreme Court upheld most of the health care law’s provisions; 45% say either that the court rejected most provisions (15%) or do not know what the court did (30%). Among those aware that the court upheld most of the law, 50% approve of the decision while 42% disapprove. The persistent partisan divisions over the law are reflected in the public’s reactions to the court’s June 28 decision. Seven-in-ten Republicans disapprove of the Court’s decision, while 66% of Democrats approve of it. About four-in- ten (42%) independents disapprove of the ruling while 32% approve. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted May 17-20, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,006 adults age 18 or older, including 379 cell phone interviews.

Early Reaction to Supreme Court Decision on the ACA    Monday, July 02, 2012
This poll fielded following the Supreme Court’s decision upholding the heart of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) finds a majority of Americans (56 percent) now say they would like to see the law’s detractors stop their efforts to block its implementation and move on to other national problems. Democrats overwhelmingly say opponents should move on to other issues (82 percent), as do half (51 percent) of independents and a quarter (26 percent) of Republicans.  But, seven in ten Republicans (69 percent) say they want to see efforts to stop the law continue, a view shared by 41 percent of independents and 14 percent of Democrats. The public is also divided in its emotional reaction to the decision, with similar shares reporting being angry (17 percent) and enthusiastic (18 percent).  Negative emotions run highest among Republicans who support the Tea Party movement, with 49 percent of this group saying they are angry at the decision. Solid majorities of voters of every political stripe say the decision won’t impact whether or not they vote this November – though Republicans are more likely than Democrats (31 percent compared to 18 percent) to say the result makes them more likely to turn out. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted June 28-30, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,239 adults age 18 or older, including 527 cell phone interviews.

Cell Internet Use 2012    Tuesday, June 26, 2012

17% of cell phone owners do most of their online browsing on their phone, rather than a computer or other device. Most do so for convenience, but for some their phone is their only option for online access. Some 88% of U.S. adults own a cell phone of some kind as of April 2012, and more than half of these cell owners (55%) use their phone to go online. These individuals are called “cell internet users” throughout this report, and this represents a notable increase from the 31% of cell owners who said that they used their phone to go online as recently as April 2009.



Libraries, patrons, and e-books    Friday, June 22, 2012
12% of readers of e-books borrowed an e-book from the library in the past year. But a majority of Americans do not know that this service is provided by their local library. All the statistics in this report, including all specific data about various groups, comes from a series of nationally-representative phone surveys of Americans. They were conducted in English and Spanish, by landline and cell phone. The main survey, of 2,986 Americans ages 16 and older, was conducted on November 16-December 21, 2011, and extensively focused on the new terrain of e-reading and people’s habits and preferences. This work was underwritten by a grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. All the quantitative statistics in this report, including all specific data about various groups, comes from a series of nationally-representative phone surveys of Americans. They were conducted in English and Spanish, by landline and cell phone. The main survey, of 2,986 Americans ages 16 and older, was conducted on November 16-December 21, 2011, and extensively focused on the new terrain of e-reading and people’s habits and preferences. This work was underwritten by a grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The qualitative material in this report, including the extended quotes from individuals regarding e-books and library use, comes from two sets of online interviews that were conducted in May 2012.

Pew Poll: GOP Holds Early Turnout Edge, But Little Enthusiasm for Romney    Thursday, June 21, 2012
Less than five months before Election Day, voters are not as engaged with the presidential campaign as they were at this point four years ago, when interest in the campaign reached record levels. But voter engagement today generally equals or surpasses levels from the four campaigns prior to 2008, indicating that 2012 could be another relatively high turnout election. Two-thirds of registered voters say they are giving quite a lot of thought to the election, which is down slightly from 2008 but higher than in any campaign from 1992 through 2004. Interest in election news, also lower than four years ago, surpasses interest in all other campaigns since 1992. The percentage of registered voters who say they are more interested in politics than they were four years ago, which hit an all-time high in June 2008, is down sharply since then. Even so, the 48% who say they are now more interested in politics is identical to the number saying this in 2004 – and higher than the numbers expressing comparatively greater interest in politics than in 2000 and 1996. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted June 7-17, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 2,013 adults age 18 or older, including 886 cell phone interviews.

Poll Finds Public Backs EPA, Not GOP, on Mercury    Thursday, June 21, 2012
A majority of Americans don’t support a Republican-backed measure the Senate is expected to vote on Wednesday that would nix a landmark environmental rule controlling air pollution from power plants. But they don’t support the regulation as is, either.
A new United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection Poll finds that 57 percent of the public supports a recently-finalized Environmental Protection Agency rule controlling mercury and other toxic air pollution from coal-fired power plants as long as companies are given more time to comply. The poll found that a similar majority—55 percent—thinks EPA should be able to control greenhouse-gas emissions that most scientists agree cause climate change. Just slightly more than one-third of the public—36 percent—said Congress should stop EPA from such regulation. A federal court is expected to rule soon on whether the agency is within its right to regulate greenhouse-gas emissions.The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted June 10-17, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,002 adults age 18 or older, including 401 cell phone interviews.


Don’t Extend Bush Cuts for Wealthy    Tuesday, June 19, 2012
As President Obama navigates a choppy economy in his reelection bid, he can rely on one comforting fact: Americans continue to strongly embrace his opposition to extending tax breaks for those earning more than $250,000 a year. A new United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection Poll shows that only 26 percent of the public wants to see all of the tax breaks created during the George W. Bush administration, which are set to expire at year’s end, extended for at least another year. And only 18 percent want the tax breaks across all income levels made permanent, the position taken by Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney. That the broader public prefers taxing the rich to taxing themselves is not surprising. But the poll results offer evidence of the political benefits that the president can derive from his opposition to the Bush-era tax breaks for high-income earners. Obama has made this a centerpiece of his campaign. It also shows the difficulties that the GOP faces trying to convince voters that the $250,000 threshold hits small businesses and would hurt the economy, and why that narrative has gained little traction with the public at large. In the poll, 47 percent of respondents said they wanted to see the tax breaks extended only for those earning less than $250,000. Eighteen percent said they prefer that all the tax breaks simply expire, which would result in higher taxes across the income spectrum. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted June 10-17, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,002 adults age 18 or older, including 401 cell phone interviews.


Pew Poll: Any Court Health Care Decision Unlikely to Please    Monday, June 18, 2012
The public is unlikely to be satisfied with the Supreme Court’s upcoming ruling on the 2010 Affordable Care Act – no matter what the Court decides. Whether the Court decides to uphold the entire law, overturn the entire law, or reject the “individual mandate” while allowing the rest of the law to remain in place, fewer than half of Americans say they would be happy with the decision. The public’s expected reactions track along partisan lines. Most Democrats would be happy if the law is upheld, while most Republicans would be happy if it is thrown out.But the other widely discussed possibility – that the court could reject the part of the law that requires individuals to have health insurance while keeping the rest – does not satisfy either side. Among Democrats, 35% would be happy with this outcome, while 56% would be unhappy. Republicans, who have consistently opposed the individual mandate, are not much happier: 43% would be happy if the court strips only this provision, while 47% would be unhappy. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted June 7-17, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 2.013 adults age 18 or older, including 886 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: Global Opinion of Obama Slips, International Policies Faulted    Wednesday, June 13, 2012
Global approval of President Barack Obama’s policies has declined significantly since he first took office, while overall confidence in him and attitudes toward the U.S. have slipped modestly as a consequence. Europeans and Japanese remain largely confident in Obama, albeit somewhat less so than in 2009, while Muslim publics remain largely critical. A similar pattern characterizes overall ratings for the U.S. – in the EU and Japan, views are still positive, but the U.S. remains unpopular in nations such as Egypt, Jordan, Turkey and Pakistan. Meanwhile, support for Obama has waned significantly in China. Since 2009, confidence in the American president has declined by 24 percentage points and approval of his policies has fallen 30 points. Mexicans have also soured on his policies, and many fewer express confidence in him today. The Obama era has coincided with major changes in international perceptions of American power – especially U.S. economic power. The global financial crisis and the steady rise of China have led many to declare China the world’s economic leader, and this trend is especially strong among some of America’s major European allies. Today, solid majorities in Germany (62%), Britain (58%), France (57%) and Spain (57%) name China as the world’s top economic power.  The results are based on data collected from telephone and face to face interviews conducted in March and April of 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among national samples from the United States and twenty other countries of adults age 18 or older.

No Blame if Court Nixes Health Care Law    Wednesday, June 06, 2012
Even though President Obama fought for passage of the landmark 2010 health care law, very small minorities say their attitudes about him would change one way or the other should the Supreme Court strike down the law that is so often referred to as “Obamacare.” Two-thirds of those surveyed in a new public-opinion poll said that their respect for Obama would be unchanged if the Supreme Court struck down his signature legislative achievement. Fourteen percent said they would respect Obama more under such a scenario, while 15 percent said they would respect him less. That trend was consistent across the political spectrum—similar proportions of Republicans, Democrats, and independents said they would be unmoved, despite the pundits’ speculation that a Court decision declaring the Affordable Care Act unconstitutional in part or in its entirety might alter public opinion toward the president. The nonplussed attitude also held across nearly all age, income, regional, and racial categories, with at least 60 percent of each surveyed group saying that the ruling would have no impact on their view of the president. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted May 31-June 6, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,012 adults age 18 or older, including 409 cell phone interviews.

Mixed Views on Health Care, Farm Bill    Tuesday, June 05, 2012
If the Supreme Court strikes down part or all of the Affordable Care Act, a strong plurality of the public wants Congress to try again to come up with a comprehensive health care law to guarantee insurance for all Americans.  Forty-six percent of respondents in a new poll favor that ambitious approach, while 18 percent say that Congress should be content to “pass smaller measures that will cover some people without insurance but not as many as the original law.” Meanwhile, 28 percent of respondents said that Congress should simply do away with all of President Obama’s 2010 law, including any parts the Supreme Court may decide to uphold. The near majority—46 percent—that favored trying to come up with another law providing health insurance to all Americans shows a public that still has an ambitious agenda for Congress at the same time that it’s wary of parts of the Obama legislation.  The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted May 31-June 3, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,012 adults age 18 or older, including 409 cell phone interviews.


Pew Poll: Partisan Polarization Surges in Bush, Obama Years    Monday, June 04, 2012
As Americans head to the polls this November, their values and basic beliefs are more polarized along partisan lines than at any point in the past 25 years. Unlike in 1987, when this series of surveys began, the values gap between Republicans and Democrats is now greater than gender, age, race or class divides. Overall, there has been much more stability than change across the 48 political values measures that the Pew Research Center has tracked since 1987. But the average partisan gap has nearly doubled over this 25-year period – from 10% in 1987 to 18% in the new study.Nearly all of the increases have occurred during the presidencies of George W. Bush and Barack Obama. During this period, both parties’ bases have often been critical of their parties for not standing up for their traditional positions. Currently, 71% of Republicans and 58% of Democrats say their parties have not done a good job in this regard.  The results for 2012 are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted April 4-15, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 3,008 adults age 18 or older, including 1,203 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: Public Sees Gas Prices Down A Little Across Much of Nation     Thursday, May 31, 2012
About half of Americans say the price of gasoline has gone down over the past month. But West Coast residents are much more likely to see gasoline prices going up, which is consistent with a rise in prices at the pump in that part of the country.  In total, 51% of the public says that – from what they have seen and heard – the price of gasoline has gone down over the past month. More than four-in-ten (44%) say the price has gone down a little, while 7% say it has gone down a lot, according to the latest national survey by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press and The Washington Post, conducted May 24-27, 2012 among 1,012 adults. At the same time, 39% say the price has gone up; 22% say a lot, while 17% say a little.Experiences differ significantly by region. Seven-in-ten (70%) of those in West Coast states say the cost of gasoline has gone up at least a little over the past month; 42% say it has gone up a lot. By contrast, nearly two-thirds (65%) along the East Coast say the cost has gone down and most (58% of those in the region) say it has gone down a little. In both cases, the prevailing perceptions match what is happening in the market. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted  May 24-27, 2012 by Princeton Survey  Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,012 adults age 18 or older living in the continental U.S., including 406 cell phone interviews.


Public Wary of Sequestration, Not Clean Energy    Thursday, May 24, 2012
A large majority of Americans support a pair of congressional efforts to create an economy based on cleaner-energy sources, according to the latest United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection Poll.  Almost two-thirds- 64 percent- of those surveyed said that Congress should extend federal tax credits that encourage production of alternative-energy sources, such as wind, that are due to expire at year's end.  In a separate question, 64 percent of respondents said they support enactment of a clean-energy standard, which would require the country to produce a higher percentage of its electricity from cleaner sources of energy.  The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted May 17-20, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,004 adults age 18 or older, including 400 cell phone interviews.

2012 AAPOR Conference - The Tea Party and Perot Voters: Kindred Spirits    Wednesday, May 23, 2012
The Tea Party movement played a critical role in delivering the 2010 Congressional vote to the Republicans. Eighteen years earlier, another group fueled by anti-establishment, anti-Washington sentiment at a time of national economic turmoil played a key role in helping the GOP take control of the U.S. House in the 1994 midterm election - the Perot voters. While there are obvious differences between today's Tea Partiers and the Perotistas of the 1990s - one largely operating within the Republican Party, the other an independent group - survey data shows these two groups share certain demographic characteristics, economic attitudes, issue priorities and sociopolitical values. This paper, written by Princeton Survey Research Associates International and presented at the 2012 American Association for Public Opinion Research conference in Orlando, examines the similiarities and differences between Ross Perot's supporters in 1994-1996 and Americans who identify with the Tea Party movement in 2010-2012. Survey data has been used to check the accuracy of various common characterizations of these two groups made by political journalists and in the academic literature. Our objective was to determine just how close Tea Party supporters and Perot voters truly are in their political perspectives and how that helps us better understand how the political environment has changed over the past 20 years.

Kaiser Family Foundation: 2012 Survey of Americans on the U.S. Role in Global Health    Tuesday, May 22, 2012
Two-thirds of Americans say that the U.S. is spending too little or about the right amount on global health with one in five saying spending is too high, according to a new Kaiser Family Foundation survey on the public's views of global health issues. Americans overall are divided on whether or not more spending by the U.S. and other major donors would lead to meaningful progress in improving health in developing countries -- 49% believe it would, while 47% believe it wouldn't make much difference. Analysis of the survey shows that those who believe more spending will lead to progress are far more likely to support increased aid than those who think it would not make a difference (42 percent, compared with 18 percent).Two-thirds of Americans say that the U.S. is spending too little or about the right amount on global health with one in five saying spending is too high, according to a new Kaiser Family Foundation survey on the public's views of global health issues. Americans overall are divided on whether or not more spending by the U.S. and other major donors would lead to meaningful progress in improving health in developing countries -- 49% believe it would, while 47% believe it wouldn't make much difference. Analysis of the survey shows that those who believe more spending will lead to progress are far more likely to support increased aid than those who think it would not make a difference (42 percent, compared with 18 percent). The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,205 adults age 18 or older, including 505 cell phone interviews.

Public Opposes Gay Weddings at Military Facilities    Tuesday, May 22, 2012
Exactly half of Americans support the House-passed legislation to bar same-sex weddings at military facilities, but only a small minority would back further federal action to restrict gay rights, according to the latest United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection Poll.  By 50 percent to 40 percent, those surveyed endorsed the prohibition against gay weddings on military bases that the House approved last Friday in the annual defense authorization bill.  But only one-fourth backed congressional action either to block gay marriage nationwide or to restore the ban on gays serving openly in the military, the survey found.  The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted May 17-20, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,004 adults age 18 or older, including 400 cell phone interviews. 

Pew Poll: Assessing the Representativeness of Public Opinion Surveys    Tuesday, May 15, 2012
Public opinion surveys conducted by telephone have struggled with lower response rates in recent years, but they continue to provide accurate data on most political, social and economic measures. The inclusion of cell phones - necessitated by the rapid rise of households with cell phones but no landline - has contributed to the overall decline in response rates for telephone surveys. At the Pew Research Center, the response rate of a typical telephone survey was 36% in 1997 and is just 9% today. But a study, based on two national telephone surveys by the Pew Research  Center for the People & the Press and conducted by Princeton Survey Research  Associates International, yields findings similar to those obtained in high-response rate government surveys on basic demographics and household characteristics. Additionally, using information from two national databases that include nearly all U.S. households, the study finds few differences between responding and non-responding households when it comes to voter registration, party identification and financial characteristics. Also, a comparison of survey estimates obtained using Pew Research's standard methodology with those from a high-effort survey - taken over a longer field period that used additional techniques to increase participation - finds that in general the additional steps do not improve the survey's estimates.


Pew Poll: Half Say View of Obama Not Affected by Gay Marriage Decision    Monday, May 14, 2012
Roughly half of Americans (52%) say Barack Obama’s expression of support for gay marriage did not affect their opinion of the president. A quarter (25%) say they feel less favorably toward Obama because of this while 19% feel more favorably. There are wide partisan and age differences in reactions to Obama’s expression of support for gay marriage, according to the latest weekly survey by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press. About half of Republicans (53%) say they feel less favorably toward Obama because of his support for gay marriage. By contrast, 60% of independents and 52% of Democrats say their view of Obama has not changed. Among independents, as many say they feel less favorably as more favorably toward Obama as a result of his gay marriage decision (19% each). Far more Democrats say they feel more favorably than less favorably toward Obama (32% vs. 13%). Among those 65 and older, 42% say they feel less favorably toward Obama, while just 15% feel more favorably; 38% say their opinion of Obama is unchanged as a result of his expression of support for gay marriage. Among younger age groups, half or more – including 62% of those under 30 – say they opinion of Obama was unaffected by his gay marriage announcement. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted  May 10-13, 2012 by Princeton Survey  Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,003 adults age 18 or older living in the continental U.S., including 400 cell phone interviews.


Key Groups Support Student Loans, VAWA    Friday, May 11, 2012

The Obama administration and congressional Democrats have spent much of this spring criticizing Hill Republicans for what they say is the GOP’s opposition to legislative initiatives including the Violence Against Women Act, student-loan subsidies, and the Paycheck Fairness Act. A new United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection Poll shows that Democrats enjoy popular support for these efforts, particularly from female and younger Americans, among whom the party seeks to enrich its electoral advantages heading into November. The poll shows that Americans largely favor the Democrats’ positions on these issues: Majorities favor provisions protecting gay and lesbian victims of domestic violence and making it easier for women to sue for wage discrimination. A plurality prefers Democrats’ plans to pay for student-loan subsidies by raising taxes on some businesses, as opposed to Republicans’ plans to shift money from a preventative-health fund created as part of the 2010 health care law. On all three issues, Democrats enjoy wider advantages among women and young Americans. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted May 3-6, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 999 adults age 18 or older living in the continental U.S., including 400 cell phone interviews.



Public Split on Dream Act, Rubio Alternative    Friday, May 11, 2012

On immigration, most Americans favor the velvet glove—and the iron fist. The latest United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection Poll found that a solid, if slightly diminishing, majority of Americans support key elements of Arizona’s anti-illegal-immigration law that the White House is seeking to overturn. But the survey also found that a preponderant majority of Americans reject the option of deporting all of the estimated 11 million immigrants here illegally, and an even larger percentage believe that young people brought to the U.S. illegally should be allowed to remain if they attend college or join the military. Presented with a Democratic proposal that would guarantee those young people a pathway to citizenship, and an emerging alternative from Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., that would not, a plurality said they prefer the Democratic version of the so-called Dream Act. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted May 3-6, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 999 adults age 18 or older living in the continental U.S., including 400 cell phone interviews.



Diversity Now    Wednesday, May 02, 2012
Coming together and pulling apart. American race relations appear to be moving in both directions at once as the nation hurtles through its greatest demographic transformation since the melting-pot era a century ago. That's the overriding message of the initial University of Phoenix/National Journal Next American Poll, the first in a series of surveys of attitudes toward the demographic change that has swelled the minority share of the population past 36 percent (up from about 20 percent in 1980) and reshaped communities, schools, and workplaces around the country. In the months ahead, the Next America polls will measure the responses of whites and minorities to many dimensions of the economic, cultural and political changes unleashed by the rapid demographic change under way.


Poll Finds Public Skeptical, Leaning Slightly Democratic    Thursday, April 26, 2012

As the presidential and congressional election season rolls on, the political landscape seems somewhat more favorable for Democrats than for Republicans, but neither party has been able to overcome the deep distrust that Americans seem to have for Congress, and neither side can afford to be anything less than nervous come Election Day. The newest findings of the United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection Poll show a public that’s predisposed to voting more Democratic. In a head-to-head race, President Obama bests Mitt Romney 47 percent to 39 percent, with 9 percent of respondents saying neither and 5 percent refusing or not knowing. Likewise, 50 percent of respondents wanted Democrats to keep control of the U.S. Senate, compared to 39 percent who favored a GOP majority. And by a 3 point margin, 46 percent to 43 percent, those surveyed said they wanted Democrats to take control of the House—down from a much sharper 11 percent lead as recently as January. Democrats found their strongest support among minorities and women. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted April 19-22, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,004 adults age 18 or older living in the continental U.S., including 799 registered voters.



Pew Poll: More Support for Gun Rights, Gay Marriage Than in 2008 or 2004    Wednesday, April 25, 2012
Opinions about a pair of contentious social issues, gun control and gay marriage, have changed substantially since previous presidential campaigns. On gun control, Americans have become more conservative; on gay marriage, they have become more liberal. Currently, 49% of Americans say it is more important to protect the rights of Americans to own guns, while 45% say it is more important to control gun ownership. Opinion has been divided since early 2009, shortly after Barack Obama’s election. From 1993 through 2008, majorities had said it was more important to control gun ownership than to protect gun rights. The latest national survey by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press, conducted April 4-15, 2012, also finds that the public is divided over gay marriage:  47% favor allowing gay and lesbian couples to marry legally, while 43% are opposed. In 2008, 39% favored and 51% opposed gay marriage, based on an average of polls conducted that year. In 2004, just 31% supported gay marriage, while nearly twice as many (60%) were opposed. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 3,008 adults age 18 or older, including 1,203 cell phone interviews.


Kaiser Health Tracking Poll – April 2012    Tuesday, April 24, 2012
The increased public attention to the Affordable Care Act generated by the Supreme Court's consideration of the law did not meaningfully change the public's opinion of the law overall or of the specific provision at the heart of critics' legal case against it, the requirement that nearly everyone obtain health insurance.  Forty-two percent say they have a favorable opinion of the law this month and 43 percent have an unfavorable one, a division virtually unchanged from March.  Similarly, the individual mandate is as unpopular as it was in March, but not more so.  Seven in ten Americans oppose this provision, including 53 percent of the public who say they hold "very unfavorable" views of it. Overall, half of Americans (51%) believe the court should rule the mandate unconstitutional, identical to March.

Public Opinion Could Lead to Further Gridlock    Tuesday, April 24, 2012

Americans are fed up with Congress and a federal government perpetually frozen in conflict, but voters remain sharply split over how to ease the gridlock in the nation’s capital, according to a new United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection Poll. Even after more than a year of pointed disagreements between President Obama and House Republicans, a narrow plurality of voters said that Washington is “more likely to make progress” on the major issues facing the country if it has a divided government after the 2012 elections. Both parties are furiously trying to sell their vision to the nation, but wary voters, after three consecutive wave elections that saw at least 20 House seats change party hands, don’t appear ready to grant either side an unequivocal mandate. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted April 19-22, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,004 adults age 18 or older living in the continental U.S., including 401 cell phone interviews.




Looking Ahead, Public Sees Little Getting Done on Hill    Monday, April 23, 2012

The American public is so doubtful about Congress’s ability to get things done that barely one in 10 of those surveyed for the latest edition of the United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection Poll believe that it’s “very likely” it can reduce the federal budget deficit or address immigration policy and the nation’s energy needs. When it comes to addressing the nation’s still-disappointing job situation, the number who answered that it’s “very likely” went up, but only to 19 percent. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted April 12-15, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,002 adults age 18 or older, including 401 cell phone interviews.



Public Doubts Congress Can Get Jobs Policy Done    Monday, April 23, 2012

Most Americans think it is very important for Congress to address the nation’s job situation and reduce the federal budget deficit over the next year, but they remain pessimistic that President Obama and the legislative branch will agree on those issues, according to a new United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection Poll that also reveals a pervading and continuing distrust of Washington since last summer’s debt-ceiling debacle. Although jobs and the deficit are the public’s two top priorities, the poll also shows that a clear majority would prefer that Obama and Congress agree to a plan to create more jobs, and Americans are more optimistic that the two branches will find agreement on that issue. But overall, the poll shows little confidence in the government’s ability to make progress on the most important problems facing the country. The public has less faith in Washington than it did before last summer’s debate over raising the federal debt limit, although its confidence in government has rebounded slightly since this winter’s payroll-tax showdown. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted April 12-15, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,002 adults age 18 or older, including 401 cell phone interviews.



Pew Poll: With Voters Focused on Economy, Obama Lead Narrows     Tuesday, April 17, 2012
With voters continuing to focus on economic issues, Barack Obama holds a slim 49% to 45% advantage over Mitt Romney in the latest Pew Research Center survey of nearly 2,400 registered voters nationwide. Obama’s lead has narrowed since last month, when he had a 12-point advantage, though it is comparable to margins from earlier this year. More than eight-in-ten voters say the economy (86%) and jobs (84%) are very important issues in deciding who to vote for this fall. The latest national survey by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press, conducted April 4-15, 2012 among 3,008 adults, including 2,373 registered voters, shows that Obama continues to owe his lead to support from women, college graduates, blacks, Latinos and lower income voters – all of whom support him over Romney by double-digits.

Pew Poll: 74% of Republicans Say Romney 'Definitely' the Nominee     Monday, April 09, 2012
Following primary victories in Wisconsin, Maryland and the District of Columbia last Tuesday, Mitt Romney is clearly seen as the inevitable GOP nominee, and Republicans now see continued primaries as bad for the party. In the latest national survey by the Pew Research Center for the People and the Press, conducted April 5-8, 2012, roughly three-quarters (74%) of Republican and Republican-leaning voters say that Romney will definitely be the Republican Party’s nominee this fall. Only 21% believe a candidate other than Romney still has a chance to become the party’s nominee.

Pew Poll: Wide Racial, Partisan Gaps in Reactions to Trayvon Martin Coverage    Wednesday, April 04, 2012
The Trayvon Martin shooting is the public’s top story for the second consecutive week. But interest in the teenager’s death is deeply divided along partisan, as well as racial, lines. These differences also are apparent in reactions to news coverage of the incident: Far more Republicans (56%) than Democrats (25%) say there has been too much coverage of Martin’s death. The latest weekly News Interest Index survey, conducted March 29-April 1, finds that 30% say they followed Martin’s death more closely than any other story, little changed from a week ago (25%). The Supreme Court hearings on the 2010 health care law are a distant second; 15% say they followed the Court hearings most closely. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,000 adults age 18 or older, including 401 cell phone interviews.

Pew Poll: Hearings Hurt Public Regard for both Health Care Law and Supreme Court    Monday, April 02, 2012
While most Americans say last week’s Supreme Court hearings on the 2010 health care law did not change their views of the law or of the Court, they did more harm than good to the image of both. In the latest national survey by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press and The Washington Post, nearly two-thirds (63%) say what they saw and heard about the hearings did not change their opinion of the health care law, while 23% say they now have a less favorable opinion and just 7% a more favorable opinion of it. Similarly, 65% say their view of the Supreme Court remains unchanged after the hearings, but the number who say their view of the Court has grown more negative is three times the number who say it has grown more positive (21% vs. 7%). The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted March 29-April 1, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,000 adults age 18 or older, including 401 cell phone interviews.

Boehner Doesn't Draw Strong Opinions, but His Ideas do    Thursday, March 29, 2012

More than two years into his tenure as House speaker, John Boehner faces a public that is uncertain about who he is but has strong feelings—positive and negative—toward his policy initiatives, according to the latest findings of the United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection Poll. A plurality of those surveyed—39 percent—either had no opinion of the speaker or would not answer a question about his job performance. Among respondents who did express an opinion, 22 percent approved of Boehner’s performance and 38 percent disapproved. But if Boehner is an undefined figure for a substantial segment of the population, his ideas have traction. Earlier editions of the survey have shown substantial public support for building the Keystone XL oil pipeline, something the speaker has hammered at repeatedly and used as a battering ram against President Obama and congressional Democrats. This new survey shows that a less-well-known notion that Boehner has put forward—using some of the revenue from oil drilling to pay for the nation’s highways—was favored by 55 percent of those surveyed and opposed by 32 percent. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted March 22-25, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,003 adults age 18 or older, including 401 cell phone interviews.



Public Still Opposes Health Care Mandate    Thursday, March 29, 2012

Americans remain overwhelmingly against requiring individuals to purchase health insurance, but they divide in half about the health care law that President Obama signed in 2010, according to the latest United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection Poll. The poll found sweeping opposition to the so-called individual mandate, whose constitutionality the Supreme Court is considering. But it also found the nation split along overlapping lines of partisanship and race when respondents were asked about the impact of Obama’s health reform law and its effort to expand coverage to the uninsured. At the same time, the Republican proposal to restructure Medicare into a premium-support or voucher system faces resistance as widespread as the individual mandate. The mandate on individuals to purchase insurance or pay a penalty, as in earlier national polls, remains an idea without any significant constituency. Overall, when asked if “the federal government should or should not be able to require all Americans to obtain health insurance or else pay a fine,” just 28 percent of those surveyed said they supported the mandate, while 66 percent opposed it. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted March 22-25, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,003 adults age 18 or older, including 401 cell phone interviews.



Pew Poll: Public Remains Split on Health Care Bill, Opposed to Mandate    Monday, March 26, 2012
As the 2010 Affordable Care Act comes before the U.S. Supreme Court this week, surveys show that the public remains divided over the basic law. However, majorities continue to oppose the key element of the bill before the Court this week – the requirement that all Americans buy health insurance or face a penalty. A review of recent polling finds that basic assessments of the law are as divided as they were when the law was passed two years ago. In the latest Pew Research Center survey conducted March 7-11, 47% of Americans approved of the health care legislation passed by Barack Obama and Congress, while 45% disapproved. This mirrors the balance of opinion in the weeks after the bill was passed. In April 2010, 40% approved and 44% disapproved of the law. Five other major surveys conducted over the past month find similar divisions of opinion, and with little change from two years ago.

Pew Poll: GOP Candidates in a Word    Thursday, March 22, 2012

When Americans are asked what one word comes to mind when thinking about Mitt Romney, no single term stands out. The most frequent responses are “no” or “no way,” along with “rich.”
That represents a shift from October and December 2011. In both of those surveys, far more mentioned the Republican presidential candidate’s Mormon faith than anything else.  The latest national survey by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press and The Washington Post, conducted March 15-18 among 1,009 adults, finds that more people offer negative than positive assessments of Romney. This also is the case for Romney’s rivals for the GOP nomination– Rick Santorum, Newt Gingrich and Ron Paul. As was the case in December, roughly twice as many give negative one-word descriptions of Romney than positive terms (30% vs. 14%); 29% offer neutral terms.



More See "Too Much" Religious Talk by Politicians    Wednesday, March 21, 2012
A new survey finds signs of public uneasiness with the mixing of religion and politics. The number of people who say there has been too much religious talk by political leaders stands at an all-time high since the Pew Research Center began asking the question more than a decade ago. And most Americans continue to say that churches and other houses of worship should keep out of politics. Nearly four-in-ten Americans (38%) now say there has been too much expression of religious faith and prayer from political leaders, while 30% say there has been too little. In 2010, more said there was too little than too much religious expression from politicians (37% vs. 29%). The percentage saying there is too much expression of religious faith by politicians has increased across party lines, but this view remains far more widespread among Democrats than Republicans. The latest national survey by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press and the Pew Research Center's Forum on Religion on Public Life finds that 54% think that churches and other houses of worship should keep out of political matters; 40% say they should express their views on social and political questions. That is largely unchanged over the past four years, but between 1996 and 2000 the balance of opinion on this question consistently tilted in the opposite direction. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted March 7-11, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,503 adults age 18 or older, including 603 cell phone interviews.


As Gas Prices Pinch, Support for Oil and Gas Production Grows    Monday, March 19, 2012
At a time of rising gas prices, the public's energy priorities have changed. More Americans continue to view the development of alternative energy sources as a higher priority than the increased production of oil, coal and natural gas, but the gap has narrowed considerably over the past year. Moreover, support for allowing more offshore oil and gas drilling in U.S. waters, which plummeted during the 2010 Gulf of Mexico oil spill, has recovered to pre-spill levels. Nearly two-thirds (65%) favor allowing increased offshore drilling, up from 57% a year ago and 44% in June 2010, during the Gulf spill. The latest national survey by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press finds that 52% say the more important priority for addressing the nation's energy supply is to develop alternative sources, such as wind, solar and hydrogen technology, while 39% see expanding the exploration and production of oil, coal and natural gas the greater priority. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted March 7-11, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,503 adults age 18 or older, including 603 cell phone interviews.


Little Support for U.S. Intervention in Syrian Conflict    Thursday, March 15, 2012
There is strong public sentiment against the United States intervening in the fighting in Syria between government forces and anti-government groups. Nearly two-thirds (64%) say the United States does not have a responsibility to do something about the conflict in Syria. Similar percentages oppose the U.S. and its allies bombing Syrian military forces to protect anti-government groups, as they did in Libya, and sending arms and military supplies to those fighting the government of President Bashar al-Assad. The public also continues to support withdrawing U.S. forces from Afghanistan as soon as possible. But when it comes to Iran’s nuclear program, there is greater concern that the United States will wait too long to act than that it will act too quickly. The latest national survey by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press finds that opposition to U.S. involvement in Syria crosses party lines. Majorities of Republicans and Democrats say the U.S. does not have a responsibility to get involved, and reject airstrikes or the shipment of arms to anti-government forces. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted March 7-11, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,503 adults age 18 or older, including 603 cell phone interviews.


Kaiser Health Tracking Poll -- March 2012    Wednesday, March 14, 2012

As the oral arguments on the Affordable Care Act (ACA) begin in two weeks before the Supreme Court, the March Kaiser Health Tracking Poll finds that Americans' views on the case mirror their views on the health reform law and that they expect parts of the ACA to continue whatever the Court rules.

The poll finds that half of all Americans (51%) think the Court should rule the mandate unconstitutional and about the same number (53%) expect the justices to do so. Those views about what the Court should do reflect public opinion about the Affordable Care Act (ACA) more generally.  



Romney Leads GOP Contest, Trails in Matchup with Obama    Wednesday, March 14, 2012
Mitt Romney has retaken a significant lead nationally in the race for the Republican presidential nomination, even as he has fallen further behind Barack Obama in a general election matchup. Moreover, Obama's own job approval rating has reached 50% for the first time since last May, shortly after the killing of Osama bin Laden. The latest national survey by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press conducted by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among 1,503 adults, including 1,188 registered voters and 538 Republican and Republican-leaning voters, finds that  Romney leads Rick Santorum, 33% to 24%, in the GOP nomination contest. A month ago, the two men were in a virtual tie (28% Romney, 30% Santorum). But both GOP frontrunners are running well behind Obama in general election matchups. Among all voters, Obama leads Romney by 12 points (54% to 42%) and Santorum by 18 points (57% to 39%). Obama's advantage among women voters, while largely unchanged from a month ago, remains substantial -- 20 points over Romney and 26 points over Santorum.


Survey Reveals Nation Divided Over Energy Woes    Wednesday, March 14, 2012
Americans haven't reached a consensus on what is causing the most recent spike in energy prices or what to do about it, according to the latest edition of the United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection Poll. There is no majority -- only pluralities -- agreeing on what's causing the pain at the gas pump, according to the poll, which measures public attitudes toward issues facing Congress. And within those pluralities, divisions of class, race, and political affiliation were gaping. When asked what is most responsible for rising gasoline costs, 38 percent chalked it up to "the manipulation of prices by large energy companies." A less conspiratorial explanation -- "tension in the Middle East, particularly over Iran and nuclear weapons" -- was cited by 28 percent of respondents. A full 14 percent of respondents thought "the policies of President Obama" were to blame, while a much smaller number, 5 percent, blamed "the policies of Congressional Republicans." The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted March 8-11, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,005 adults age 18 or older living in the continental U.S., including 403 cell phone interviews.


Poll Shows Public Supports Obama on Gas Prices    Tuesday, March 13, 2012
More Americans trust President Obama than congressional Republicans to make the right decisions to bring down the price of gasoline, according to a new poll, although neither side commands a majority. What's more, as prices continue to rise and the specter of $5-per-gallon gas for the summer driving season looms over the political landscape, the latest United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection Poll shows the public is slightly more supportive of the energy priorities of the Democrats and the president than those of the GOP. Forty-four percent of respondents trust Obama more to "make the right decisions to help bring down the price of gasoline," versus 32 percent for Republicans in Congress, according to the poll. Only 1 percent said both; 16 percent said neither and 7 percent didn't know or refused to answer. Americans put somewhat more stock in the Democrats' policy of conservation and development of alternative energy sources, such as wind and solar power, than they do in the Republicans' emphasis on greater domestic production of oil and gas. Fifty percent of respondents said that the Democratic approach "would do more to lower fuel prices," while 42 percent went with the GOP approach. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted March 8-11, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,005 adults age 18 or older living in the continental U.S., including 403 cell phone interviews.


GOP Race is Rallying Democrats    Tuesday, March 06, 2012
The Republican nomination battle is rallying Democrats behind Barack Obama. Currently, 49% of Democrats say that as they learn more about the GOP candidates, their impression of Obama is getting better. Just 36% of Democrats expressed this view in December, before the Republican primaries began. In contrast, there has been virtually no change in Republicans' views of the GOP field during this period. According to the latest national survey by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press and The Washington Post, just 26% of Republicans say their impression of the GOP field has improved as they have learned more about the candidates. That is largely unchanged from December (30%). The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted March 1-4, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,009 adults age 18 or older living in the continental U.S., including 406 cell phone interviews.


Despite Detroit Comeback, Public Opposes Bailout    Friday, March 02, 2012
A majority of Americans think the federal government should not have helped out U.S. automakers that were in financial trouble, but rather should have allowed them to go it alone, according to a new United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection Poll. Thirty-six percent of Americans think the government should have provided help, but 55 percent think "these companies should have been allowed to succeed or fail on their own," the poll shows. The results echo other surveys, including a May 2010 poll conducted by CBS News in which a third of respondents thought the government should have helped, while 61 percent thought they should not have. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted February 23-26, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,005 adults age 18 or older living in the continental U.S., including 403 cell phone interviews.


Public Spreads Blame for Rising Gas Prices    Friday, March 02, 2012
The public spreads the blame for the recent rise in gasoline prices. While 18% say President Obama or his administration are most to blame, about as many (14%) volunteer the oil companies or domestic oil producers. Roughly one-in-ten (11%) mostly blame Iran, the upheaval in the Middle East or the threat of war in the region, according to the latest national survey by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press and The Washington Post. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted February 23-26, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,005 adults age 18 or older living in the continental U.S., including 403 cell phone interviews.


Kaiser Health Tracking Poll -- February 2012     Thursday, March 01, 2012

In the midst of continuing debate on the future of the Medicare program, the February Kaiser Family Foundation Tracking Poll finds most Americans and most seniors favor the status quo, though arguments about the program’s solvency have the potential to sway opinion toward new proposals. The survey also gauges public opinion about the ongoing contraceptive coverage debate, views of the Affordable Care Act, and trust in the presidential candidates on health care issues.



Public Divided Over Birth-Control Coverage    Tuesday, February 28, 2012
On the docket of contraception-related issues dividing the parties, more Americans lean toward the positions held by President Obama and most Democrats, though in several cases only narrowly, according to the latest United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection Poll. Probing disputes over health insurance coverage for contraception and prenatal testing, federal funding for Planned Parenthood, and whether employers must provide coverage for procedures that violate their moral or religious convictions, the survey found that women tilt more toward the Democratic position than men, with the gap usually even more pronounced among whites. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted February 23-26, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,005 adults age 18 or older living in the continental U.S., including 403 cell phone interviews.


Auto Bailout Now Backed, Stimulus Divisive    Thursday, February 23, 2012
Public support for government loans to major U.S. automakers has increased sharply since 2009. Opinions are far less positive, however, about two other major initiatives to bolster the economy – the 2008 bank bailout and the 2009 stimulus plan. Americans also are of two minds when it comes to government regulation of business. While regulations are viewed negatively in the abstract, large majorities want to maintain or even strengthen federal regulations in food production, environmental protection, automobile safety and other areas. The survey finds that 56% say the loans the government made to GM and Chrysler were mostly good for the economy, while 38% say the loans to the automakers were mostly bad for the economy.

Public More Optimistic about Economy, But Concerns Persist    Thursday, February 16, 2012
Optimism about the national economy, which sagged in 2011, has rebounded in the first two months of this year. Currently, 44% say they expect economic conditions to be better a year from now, up from 34% last month and 28% in December. Moreover, 54% say either that the economy is already recovering (25%) or that it will recover soon (29%). Last April, 44% said a recovery was already underway or would occur soon. Yet the public’s improved economic outlook is tempered by a number of factors. First, current views of the economy remain overwhelmingly negative: Just 11% say economic conditions today are excellent or good, a figure that has changed little over the past four years. Second, economic optimism has proven fragile in the past. From October 2008 through April 2010, 40% or more said they expected economic conditions to get better in the next year. But by last summer, the percentage expecting things to improve had fallen to around 30%.

Poll Shows Difficult Terrain for Both Parties    Wednesday, February 15, 2012
While President Obama is touting his federal budget for promoting “fairness,” the public sees the country’s economic problems in more subtle shades than the lawmakers who represent them. A new United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection Poll shows a public divided in its concerns about the poor. In the survey, 53 percent of adults said they were most concerned that “the government taxes workers too much to fund programs for people who could get by without help,” but 38 percent cited as their greater worry that “federal programs don’t provide enough of a safety net for people who need help to get by.” By contrast, when respondents were asked why there was such a spike in the number of Americans receiving federal aid such as food stamps and housing vouchers, Americans seem more liberal in their views. Some 54 percent agreed that “high unemployment has left more people in need of government assistance,” while about 41 percent took a more conservative view that “government is providing benefits for too many people who don’t actually need them.” The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted February 9-12, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,000 adults age 18 or older living in the continental U.S., including 400 cell phone interviews.


Poll: Americans Split on Concern for Very Poor    Tuesday, February 14, 2012
As the debate over the federal budget resumes, a new United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection Poll shows that most Americans are concerned about growing dependency on federal entitlements, but still resist major spending cuts in programs benefiting the poor and the elderly. The survey captured a complex weave of attitudes surrounding the social safety net as President Obama and Congressional Republicans prepare for another year of combat over taxes and spending. Like many other surveys over the years, this poll found Americans simultaneously expressing philosophical concern about dependency and practical reluctance to significantly cut programs that support the economically vulnerable. After Republican presidential contender Mitt Romney stirred controversy recently by declaring on CNN that he "was not concerned about the very poor" because they had a safety net to shelter them from the economic storm, the poll found Americans closely divided on who has suffered most during the downturn. A slim 51 percent majority said the middle class "is suffering the most" during the economic slowdown, while 45 percent said the poor had absorbed the most pain. Just 1 percent picked the wealthy. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted February 9-12, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research  Associates International among a national sample of 1,000 adults age 18 or older living in the continental U.S., including 400 cell phone interviews.


Santorum Catches Romney in GOP Race    Monday, February 13, 2012
Rick Santorum’s support among Tea Party Republicans and white evangelicals is surging, and he now has pulled into a virtual tie with Mitt Romney in the race for the Republican presidential nomination. In polling conducted Feb. 8-12, 30% of Republican and Republican-leaning registered voters favor Santorum while 28% favor Romney. As recently as a month ago, Romney held a 31% to 14% advantage over Santorum among all GOP voters. Santorum is now the clear favorite of Republican and GOP-leaning voters who agree with the Tea Party, as well as white evangelical Republicans. Currently, 42% of Tea Party Republican voters favor Santorum, compared with just 23% who back Romney. Santorum holds an almost identical advantage among white evangelical Republican voters (41% to 23%). The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted February 8-12, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,501 U.S. adults age 18 or older, including 1,172 registered voters and 552 Republican and Republican-leaning voters.

Employment Rate for Young Adults Lowest in 60 Years, Study Says    Thursday, February 09, 2012
In a new Huffington Post article:
Are you young and looking for work? You're in good company.
Just 54 percent of Americans age 18 to 24 currently have jobs, according to a study released Thursday by the Pew Research  Center. That's the lowest employment rate for this age group since the government began keeping track in 1948. And it's a sharp drop from the 62 percent who had jobs in 2007 - suggesting the recession is crippling career prospects for a broad swatch of young people who were still in high school or college when the downturn began.
The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted December 6-19, 2011 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 2,048 adults age 18 or older living in the continental U.S., including 1,279 cell phone interviews.


Cable Leads the Pack as Campaign News Source    Tuesday, February 07, 2012
With a contested primary in only one party this year, fewer Americans are closely following news about the presidential campaign than four years ago. As a consequence, long-term declines in the number of people getting campaign news from such sources as local TV and network news have steepened, and even the number gathering campaign news online, which had nearly tripled between 2000 and 2008, has leveled off in 2012. The one constant over the course of the past four elections is the reach of cable news. Currently, 36% of Americans say they are regularly learning about the candidates or campaign on cable news networks. That is virtually unchanged from previous campaigns, yet cable news is now the top regular source for campaign news. The cable networks also hosted most of the candidate debates, which stand out as a particularly interesting aspect of the campaign. Nearly half of Republicans (47%) have watched a GOP debate during this campaign, up from 32% at a comparable point four years ago. In contrast to cable, the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press' 2012 campaign news survey, conducted January 4-8, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among 1,507 adults nationwide, finds broad declines in the numbers getting campaign news from newspapers, and local and network TV news.


Why most Facebook users get more than they give    Friday, February 03, 2012
Most Facebook users receive more from their Facebook friends than they give, according to a new study that for the first time combines server logs of Facebook activity with survey data to explore the structure of Facebook friendship networks and measures of social well-being. The survey results in this report are based on data from telephone interviews conducted by Princeton Survey Research Associates International from October 20 to November 28, 2010, among a sample of 2,255 adults, age 18 and older. Interviews were conducted in English. A combination of landline and cellular random digit dial (RDD) samples was used to represent all adults in the continental United States who have access to either a landline or cellular telephone.

Poll Finds Americans Pumped for Oil Pipeline    Wednesday, February 01, 2012
The overall  benefits of the proposed Keystone XL oil pipeline outweigh the risks to the environment for most Americans, including groups that are historically more environmentally conscious, according to a recent United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection Poll. The overwhelming majority of Americans surveyed -64 percent- agreed that building a pipeline from Canada to the United States would ease America's dependence on Mideast oil and create jobs, the poll showed. Just 22 percent of respondents agreed with opponents of the controversial pipeline, who fear its environmental impact, and 13 percent were undecided. Even constituencies that are usually more likely to choose protecting the environment over promoting economic growth are, at this point, supportive of the project. A majority of Democrats, 51 percent, said they support building the pipeline, while just one-third opposed it. Sixty percent of those who live in urban areas said they back building the pipeline. Even 60 percent of respondents ages 18 to 29 support it. The lack of opposition among subgroups that are typically more environmentally conscious is likely reflective of the weak U.S. economy, combined with an overall lack of awareness about the issue. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted January 26-29, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research  Associates International among a national sample of 1,008 adults age 18 or older living in the continental U.S., including 402 cell phone interviews.


Voters Favor Obama Ideas But Keystone, Too    Tuesday, January 31, 2012
According to the latest United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection Poll, Americans overwhelmingly support the key ideas President Obama laid out in his State of the Union address last week but also favor the GOP approach to taxes and regulation and a controversial oil pipeline from Canada to the U.S. - all while doubting the ability of the president and Congress to come to agreement. By a whopping 76-percent-to-19-percent margin, Americans agreed with Obama's proposal to "impose a minimum tax on money American companies earn from their operations abroad to discourage them from creating jobs overseas and encourage them to create jobs in the U.S." When it comes to the so-called Buffett Rule - named for billionaire investor Warren Buffett - 65-percent surveyed agreed with the proposition that Congress should "establish a new rule that anyone who earns at least $1 million annually must pay at least 30 percent of their income in taxes," while just 31 percent disagreed. And once again expressing doubt about Washington's ability to get things done, an eye-popping 70 percent of respondents said it was not too likely or not at all likely that the president and Congress would agree on the major ideas Obama presented. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted January 26-29, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,008 adults age 18 or older living in the continental U.S., including 402 cell phone interviews.


GOP Voters Continue to Give Field Subpar Ratings    Monday, January 30, 2012
Amid a bruising primary campaign, Republicans remain unimpressed with their party's presidential field. In fact, more Republican and  Republican-leaning registered voters say the GOP field is only fair or poor (52%) than did so in early January (44%). By comparison, just 46% of Republican voters have positive opinions of the GOP field, according to the latest survey by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press, conducted Jan 26-29, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among 1,006 adults, including 341 Republican and Republican-leaning registered voters. In early January, shortly before the New Hampshire primary, 51% gave the field excellent or good ratings while 44% rated the candidates collectively as only fair or poor. That survey showed that GOP voters' ratings of the field are far less positive than were opinions of the Republican field in 2008. At about this point four years ago, 68% of Republican and GOP-leaning voters rated the field as excellent or good.


The rise of in-store mobile commerce    Monday, January 30, 2012
More than half of adult cell phone owners used their cell phones while they were in a store during the 2011 holiday season to seek help with purchasing decisions. Thirty-eight percent of cell owners used their phone to call a friend while they were in a store for advice about a purchase they were considering making. Twenty-four percent of cell owners used their phone to look up reviews of a product online while they were in a store. Twenty-five percent of adult cell owners used their phones to look up the price of a product online while they were in a store, to see if they could get a better price somewhere else. Taken together, just over half (52%) of all adult cell owners used their phone for at least one of these three reasons over the holiday shopping season and one third (33%) used their phone specifically for online information while inside a physical store—either product reviews or pricing information.

 



Kaiser Health Tracking Poll -- January 2012    Thursday, January 26, 2012

As the Supreme Court prepares to hear legal challenges to the health reform law in March, most Americans expect the Justices to base their ruling on their own ideological views rather than their interpretation of the law, according to the January Health Tracking Poll. Other key findings include:

The public doubts the Supreme Court renders judgments based solely on the law.  Three-quarters (75%) say they think that, in general, Justices let their own ideological views influence their decisions while 17 percent say they usually decide cases based on legal analysis without regard to politics and ideology.  Similarly, when asked specifically about the challenge to the individual mandate in the health reform law, six in ten (59%) Americans say they expect the Justices will take their own ideological views into account, while 28 percent think their decision will be based purely on legal analysis and interpretation.
As for the public's own views of the mandate, the January poll shows that the requirement that everyone obtain health insurance or pay a fine continues to be unpopular. This month's poll finds the public more than twice as likely to have an unfavorable rather than favorable view of the provision (67% to 30%), very much in line with findings of previous Kaiser polls. Reflecting this dislike for a mandate, 54 percent of Americans say the Court should rule the individual mandate unconstitutional, while just 17 percent say they think it should be found constitutional. Roughly mirroring public views on the mandate, 55 percent of the public say they expect the Justices to find the mandate unconstitutional and 29 percent expect the Justices to find it constitutional.



Poll Finds Voters Wary of Congressional GOP     Tuesday, January 24, 2012
Americans are losing faith in congressional Republicans, according to a new United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection Poll that underscores President Obama's strategy as he presents his priorities on Tuesday night in his annual State of the Union address and prepares to mount his reelection campaign.

And there is some evidence that the strategy is working: More voters polled say they would rather see Obama reelected over a Republican opponent - and Democrats win control of the House of Representatives - in November. On the central issues before Congress this year and voters this November, Obama has moved ahead of Republican legislators over the past four months, according to the poll. Asked to choose whom they trusted more between Obama and congressional Republicans "to develop solutions to the country's economic challenges," 41 percent preferred Obama and 29 percent picked the Hill GOP. More than 20 percent of Americans said they trust neither Obama nor the GOP, however. Americans were split in a Congressional Connection Poll conducted last September, with 37 percent saying they trusted Obama more and 35 percent choosing the Republicans.

The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted January 19-22, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,002 adults age 18 and older living in the continental U.S., including 773 registered voters and 401 cell phone interviews.


Public Priorities: Deficit Rising, Terrorism Slipping    Monday, January 23, 2012
As the 2012 State of the Union approaches, the public continues to give the highest priority to economic issues. Fully 86% say that strengthening the economy should be a top priority for the president and Congress this year, and 82% rate improving the job situation as a top priority. None of the other 20 issues tested in this annual survey rate as a top priority for more than 70% of Americans.

More generally, the public's concerns rest more with domestic policy than at any point in the past 15 years; 81% say Obama should be focused on domestic policy, just 9% say foreign policy. In keeping with this, defending against terrorism and strengthening the military are given less priority today than over the course of the past decade.

The annual policy priorities survey by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press, conducted January 11-16, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among 1,502 adults, finds that reducing the federal budget deficit stands out as the fastest growing policy priority for Americans, largely because of increasing Republican concerns about the issue. Fully 69% rate reducing the budget deficit as a top priority - the most in any of the Pew Research Center's surveys going back to 1994.


Tablet and E-book reader Ownership Nearly Double Over the Holiday Gift-Giving Period    Monday, January 23, 2012
The share of adults in the United States who own tablet computers nearly doubled from 10% to 19% between mid-December and early January and the same surge in growth also applied to e-book readers, which also jumped from 10% to 19% over the same time period. The number of Americans owning at least one of these digital reading devices jumped from 18% in December to 29% in January. These results come from ongoing surveys by the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project aimed at tracking growth in the ownership of both devices.

Obama: Weak Job Ratings, but Positive Personal Image    Thursday, January 19, 2012
Barack Obama begins his fourth year in office facing a struggling economy, an unhappy public, and a lower job approval rating than most of his recent predecessors at a comparable point in their presidencies. In fact, Obama's job rating today is a bit more negative than it was in December: 48% disapprove of his performance as president while 44% approve.

Nonetheless, Obama possesses political strengths at the start of his reelection year, notably a positive personal image. Large majorities say Obama stands up for his beliefs (75%), cares about people like them (61%) and is trustworthy (61%). And while perceptions of Obama's leadership have declined over time, on balance more say he is a strong leader than disagree (52% vs. 45%).  The latest national survey by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press, conducted Jan. 11-16, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among 1,502 adults, finds that Obama's personal image is much stronger than GOP frontrunner Mitt Romney's. Currently, 51% say they have a favorable opinion of Obama while 45% have an unfavorable view. Romney's favorability with the public stands at just 31%, while his unfavorable rating is as high as Obama's (45%).


Rising Share of Americans See Conflict Between Rich and Poor    Friday, January 13, 2012
The Occupy Wall Street movement no longer occupies Wall Street, but the issue of class conflict has captured a growing share of the national consciousness. A new Pew Research Center survey of 2,048 adults finds that about two-thirds of the public (66%) believes there are "very strong" or "strong" conflicts between the rich and the poor -- an increase of 19 percentage points since 2009. Not only have perceptions of class conflict grown more prevalent; so, too, has the belief that these disputes are intense. According to the new survey, three-in-ten Americans (30%) say there are "very strong conflicts" between poor people and rich people. That is double the proportion that offered a similar view in July 2009 and the largest share expressing this opinion since the question was first asked in 1987. The results are based on data collected from landline (769) and cell phone (1,279) interviews conducted December 6-19, 2011 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International in English and Spanish.

Please click here to view the New York Times article on this study


Real Time Charitable Giving    Thursday, January 12, 2012
Charitable donations from mobile phones have grown more common in recent years. Two thirds (64%) of American adults now use text messaging, and 9% have texted a charitable donation from their mobile phone. And these text donors are emerging as a new cohort of charitable givers. The first-ever, in-depth study on mobile donors—which analyzed the "Text to Haiti" campaign after the 2010 earthquake—finds that these contributions were often spur-of-the-moment decisions that spread virally through friend networks. Three quarters of these donors (73%) contributed using their phones on the same day they heard about the campaign, and a similar number (76%) say that they typically make text message donations without conducting much in-depth research beforehand.

GOP Voters Still Unenthused About 2012 Field    Monday, January 09, 2012
On the eve of the New Hampshire primary, Republican voters continue to express mixed views of the party's presidential field. Roughly half (51%) of Republican and Republican-leaning registered voters say the candidates are excellent or good, while 44% say they are only fair or poor. The percentage expressing positive views of the GOP presidential field is largely unchanged from 48% in November and 49% in August. Republicans and GOP leaners expressed much more positive views of the presidential field at a comparable point four year ago: in January 2008, 68% of Republicans and Republican leaners said they had good candidates to choose from, as did 78% of Democrats and Democratic leaners. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted January 4-8, 2012 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,507 adults, including 549 Republican and  Republican-leaning registered voters.


Little Change in Public's Response to 'Capitalism,' 'Socialism'    Wednesday, December 28, 2011
The recent Occupy Wall Street protests have focused public attention on what organizers see as the excesses of America’s free market system, but perceptions of capitalism – and even of socialism – have changed little since early 2010 despite the recent tumult. The American public’s take on capitalism remains mixed, with just slightly more saying they have a positive (50%) than a negative (40%) reaction to the term. That’s largely unchanged from a 52% to 37% balance of opinion in April 2010. Socialism is a negative for most Americans, but certainly not all. Six-in-ten (60%) say they have a negative reaction to the word; 31% have a positive reaction. Those numbers are little changed from when the question was last asked in April 2010.

Tax System Seen as Unfair, in Need of Overhaul    Tuesday, December 20, 2011
Public dissatisfaction with the tax system has grown over the past decade, and the focus of the public’s frustration is not how much they themselves pay, but rather the impression that wealthy people are not paying their fair share. The number of Americans who feel they pay more than their fair share in federal taxes has dropped significantly over the past decade, from 55% in 2000 to 38% today. About half (52%) now say they pay the right amount in taxes.  Yet at the same time, fewer see the overall tax system as even moderately fair (43%, down from 51% eight years ago), and roughly six-in-ten (59%) say that so much is wrong with the tax system that Congress should completely change it.

Frustration with Congress Could Hurt Republican Incumbents    Thursday, December 15, 2011
Public discontent with Congress has reached record levels, and the implications for incumbents in next year’s elections could be stark. Two-in-three voters say most members of Congress should be voted out of office in 2012 – the highest on record. And the number who say their own member should be replaced matches the all-time high recorded in 2010, when fully 58 members of Congress lost reelection bids – the most in any election since 1948. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted December 7-11, 2011.

Poll: Independent Voters Are Angry, Despairing    Wednesday, December 14, 2011
Americans are as disgusted with their government - and with Congress, in particular - as they have ever been, and the overwhelming disillusionment of independents portends great electoral uncertainty next November, according to an analysis of the latest United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection Poll. Overall, the poll shows that those voters aligned with neither party lack confidence in the federal government and are more eager to change the people who make up that government. Independents are also significantly less confident in the government than they were last summer, before the bitter, scorched-earth fight over raising the federal debt ceiling and the failure of the super committee to produce a plan to reduce the budget deficit. Twenty-nine percent of respondents have "a lot" or "some confidence" that the federal government will make progress over the next year on the most important problems facing the country. But among independents, just 18 percent express that level of confidence. A whopping 80 percent of independents say they have "not much confidence" or "no confidence at all" in the federal government to make progress next year. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted December 8-11, 2011 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,008 adults age 18 or older living in the continental U.S., including 400 cell phone interviews.


Anger With Congress At '06, '10 Levels    Tuesday, December 13, 2011
Across a wide array of measures, Americans are now as dissatisfied with Congress as they were immediately before the 2006 and 2010 electoral landslides that ousted the majority party in one or both chambers, according to a year-end United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection Poll. One year after Republicans made the largest gains in a midterm House election since 1938, the survey finds Americans still restless, dissatisfied, and profoundly pessimistic about Washington's capacity to make progress on the major problems facing the country. In the survey, independent voters - whose shifts in allegiance helped trigger both the big Democratic gains of 2006 and last year's Republican revival - display little faith in either party, and register a strong initial inclination to vote against their own incumbent member of Congress. Not only a solid majority of independents, but also a surprisingly large share of Republican and Democratic partisans, say they are reluctant to give either party control of both chambers, preferring instead a divided government where both can "act as a check on each other." The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted December 8-11, 2011 among a national sample of 1,008 adults age 18 or older living in the continental U.S., including 400 cell phone interviews.


Gingrich Leads, But Likely GOP Primary Voters Have Not Ruled out Romney    Tuesday, December 13, 2011
Newt Gingrich holds a substantial 35% to 21% lead over Mitt Romney among Republican and Republican-leaning independent voters who say they are very likely to vote in the GOP primaries or caucuses. But clear majorities say there is at least a chance they would vote for either Gingrich or Romney in Republican primaries in their state. None of the other Republican candidates draw nearly as much potential support. The latest national survey by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press was conducted December 7-11, 2011 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among 1,521 adults, including 392 likely Republican primary voters. It finds that 70% support Gingrich or say there is a chance they would vote for him. Romney trails Gingrich for the nomination, but as many as 61% of likely Republican primary voters either support Romney or say there is a chance they could support him.


Public Wants Immigrants to Be Able to Stay    Tuesday, December 13, 2011
As the debate over immigration continues to roil the Republican presidential field, a substantial majority of Americans say they would prefer to allow some or all illegal immigrants to remain in the United States, the latest United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection Poll has found. When asked what should be done with the roughly 11 million illegal immigrants in the country, just 25 percent of those polled said that they should all be deported "no matter how long they have been in the U.S." Another 28 percent of those surveyed said that all illegal immigrants should be allowed "to stay, provided they have broken no other laws and commit to learning English and U.S. history." The largest group, at 39 percent, said that the United States should "deport some, but allow those who have been here for many years and have broken no other laws to stay here legally." The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted December 1-4, 2011 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,008 adults age 18 or older living in the continental U.S., including 403 cell phone interviews.


Elizabeth Warren Leading Scott Brown by Biggest Margin Yet - The Huffington Post    Thursday, December 08, 2011
A wave of early television advertising appears to be working to the advantage of consumer finance watchdog Elizabeth Warren as a new poll shows her surging to her biggest advantage yet over Sen. Scott Brown (R-Mass). The survey conducted by the University of Massachusetts-Lowell and The Boston Herald finds Warren leading Brown by a 49 to 42 percent margin. Warren's showing represents a significant improvement over a previous UMass Lowell/Herald poll conducted in late September that had Brown with a nominal 41 to 38 percent lead. The results and trend comparisons are based on data collected from telephone interviews, both landline and cell phone, conducted by Princeton Survey Research Associates International in two separate surveys - the latest, conducted December 1-6, 2011 among 505 Massachusetts registered voters and the first, conducted September 22-28, 2011 among 1,005 Massachusetts registered voters.


Poll: Elizabeth Warren soars 7 up over Scott Brown - Boston Herald    Thursday, December 08, 2011
Democrat Elizabeth Warren has opened up a lead against Republican incumbent Scott Brown for the first time in their U.S. Senate showdown, but a barrage of attack ads appears to have damaged Warren and Brown's standing among Massachusetts voters, a new University of Massachusetts at Lowell/Boston Herald poll shows. Warren leads Brown by a 49-42 percent margin, outside of the poll's margin of error of plus or minus 5.3 percentage points. That number includes voters who say they are "leaning" for either candidate. But even without the "leaners," Warren still leads by a 46-41 percent margin, barely within the margin of error. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted December 1-6, 2011 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among 505 Massachusetts registered voters, including landline and cell phone interviews.


Nomination Race Hurting GOP, But Not Helping Obama    Tuesday, December 06, 2011
As the fight for the 2012 Republican presidential nomination unfolds, more Americans say their impression of the GOP field is worsening than improving, according to the latest national survey by the Pew Research Center for the People and the Press and The Washington Post. Those views, however, have not resulted in a better view of President Barack Obama at this point. By a margin of two-to-one, more say that their impression of the GOP field is getting worse (31%) than getting better (14%). Half (50%) say their impression remains the same as they learn more about the Republican candidates. About one-in-five (19%) say their impression of Obama has improved as they learn more about the Republicans. About as many (21%) say that the GOP campaign is worsening their impression of the president. Most (58%) say the Republicans have had no effect on their feelings about Obama. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted December 1-4, 2011 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,008 adults age 18 or older living in the continental U.S., including 403 cell phone interviews.


Public Wants Payroll Cut Even with Deficit    Tuesday, December 06, 2011
A majority of Americans support efforts to extend the payroll tax-cut despite concerns that an extension of the short-term reduction would increase the federal budget deficit. The public, though, is more divided on other economic issues facing Congress before the end of the year, according to a new United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection poll. The poll found that voters are seeking middle ground on extending unemployment insurance for those who have lost their jobs. The country is also split on whether regulations adopted by federal agencies hinder business growth, or if restricting regulations hurts consumers and the environment. The poll is the latest in the Congressional Connection poll, a series of national surveys that will track the public's priorities for Congress - and its assessment of Washington's performance - during most weeks that Congress is in session through 2012. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted December 1-4, 2011 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,008 adults age 18 or older living in the continental U.S., including 403 cell phone interviews.


Kaiser Health Tracking Poll – November 2011    Wednesday, November 30, 2011
The November Health Tracking Poll takes a closer look at public opinion and knowledge about specific provisions of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA).  Findings include:
* After taking a negative turn in October, the public's overall views on the ACA returned to a more mixed status this month.  Still, Americans remain somewhat more likely to have an unfavorable view of the law (44%) than a favorable one (37%).  
* The survey also finds that individual elements of the law are viewed favorably by a majority of the public.  The law's most popular element, viewed favorably by more than eight in ten (84%) and "very" favorably by six in ten, is the requirement that health plans provide easy-to-understand benefit summaries.  Also extremely popular are provisions that would award tax credits for small businesses (80% favorable, including 45% very favorable) and provide subsidies to help some individuals buy coverage (75% favorable, including 44% very favorable), as well as the provision that would gradually close the Medicare doughnut hole (74% favorable, including 46% very favorable) and the  "guaranteed issue" requirement  that prohibits health plans from denying coverage based on pre-existing conditions (67% favorable, including 47% “very” favorable).

More Now Disagree with Tea Party - Even in Tea Party Districts    Tuesday, November 29, 2011
Since the 2010 midterm elections, the Tea Party has not only lost support nationwide, but also in the congressional districts represented by members of the House Tea Party Caucus. And this year, the image of the Republican Party has declined even more sharply in these GOP-controlled districts than across the country at large. In the latest Pew Research Center survey, more Americans say they disagree (27%) than agree (20%) with the Tea Party movement. A year ago, in the wake of the sweeping GOP gains in the midterm elections, the balance of opinion was just the opposite: 27% agreed and 22% disagreed with the Tea Party. At both points, more than half offered no opinion. Throughout the 2010 election cycle, agreement with the Tea Party far outweighed disagreement in the 60 House districts represented by members of the Congressional Tea Party Caucus. But as is the case nationwide, support has decreased significantly over the past year; now about as many people living in Tea Party districts disagree (23%) as agree (25%) with the Tea Party. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted November 9-14, 2011 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 2,001 adults, including 1,576 registered voters.


Religion and the 2012 Election    Wednesday, November 23, 2011
Many Americans continue to see the Mormon faith as unfamiliar and different. Half say they know little or nothing about Mormonism, half say it is a Christian religion while a third say it is not, and roughly two-thirds believe Mormonism is “very different” from their own beliefs. There has been virtually no change in these impressions over the past four years. About half of all voters, and 60% of evangelical Republicans, know that Mitt Romney is a Mormon. The former Massachusetts governor’s religion has implications for his nomination run but not for the general election, should he be nominated as his party’s standard bearer. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted November 9-14, 2011 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 2,001 adults, including 1,576 registered voters.

Unlike Super Committee, Public United on Taxing Wealthy    Wednesday, November 23, 2011
The deficit-reduction super committee collapsed on Monday after its members failed to negotiate a proposal to reduce the nation's debt, and this week's United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection Poll showed voters likewise struggling to find common, bipartisan ground in specific ways to trim the federal deficit. The only debt-reduction proposals to earn majority support in the poll involved raising taxes on the wealthiest Americans - either by letting the Bush tax cuts expire or by reducing the value of itemized deductions. Fifty-three percent of voters thought letting the Bush tax cuts expire for families making more than $250,000 a year should be part of the deficit-reduction package, while 55 percent supported reducing the value of itemized deductions for families at the same income level, the poll showed. But even those proposals lacked the kind of strong, bipartisan support that super-committee members and rank-and-file legislators would have wanted to see in order to lend their support. While Americans overall support letting the Bush tax cuts expire for wealthier families, a 54 percent majority of Republicans thought it should not be part of the final package. On reducing deductions, Republicans were slightly more supportive, but still mixed: 47 percent thought it should be part of the package, and 41 percent did not. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted November 17-20, 2011 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,003 adults age 18 or older living in the continental U.S., including 402 cell phone interviews.


Deficit "Super Committee" Draws Little Attention    Tuesday, November 22, 2011
Few Americans (17%) paid very close attention to news about the congressional "super committee" last week as the panel approached its deadline to agree on a plan to cut federal spending and reduce the national deficit. Another 24% say they followed news about the super committee fairly closely. Most (58%) followed news about the special panel not too closely or not at all closely, according to the latest weekly News Interest Index survey by the Pew Research Center for the People and the Press. The survey was completed before panel leaders announced on Monday that they would not reach a deal by their deadline. Still, panel members and others already had indicated that a deal was unlikely. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted November 17-20, 2011 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,003 adults age 18 or older living in the continental U.S., including 402 cell phone interviews.


Poll Shows Public Opposes Sequestration    Tuesday, November 22, 2011
With the congressional deficit-reduction super committee collapsing into stalemate, a solid majority of Americans say that Congress should block the automatic spending cuts established as a fallback if the panel deadlocked, according to the latest United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection Poll. Although a majority of adults said they preferred their member of Congress to compromise on reaching a deficit-reduction agreement, and a plurality said they believed that a deal would benefit the economy, a commanding 61 percent said that Congress should stop the $1.2 trillion in automatic cuts now scheduled to be imposed after the committee announced its failure on Monday afternoon. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted November 17-20, 2011 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,003 adults age 18 or older living in the continental U.S., including 402 cell phone interviews.


Obama Job Approval Edges Up    Thursday, November 17, 2011
With much of the recent political focus on the ever-changing Republican presidential nomination race, Barack Obama’s job rating has improved modestly over the past month. And a majority of Americans continue to hold a favorable personal opinion of Obama. This is not the case for his main GOP rivals, whom he mostly bests in test election measures. Currently, as many approve (46%) of Obama’s job performance as disapprove (46%); from July through early October his job ratings were more negative than positive. A majority of Americans (52%) still have a favorable personal impression of Obama, while 45% view him unfavorably. Among the leading GOP candidates, none is viewed favorably on balance. Slightly more have an unfavorable opinion of Mitt Romney (42%) than a favorable opinion (36%), and the balance of opinion toward Herman Cain, Newt Gingrich and Rick Perry is even more negative. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted Nov. 9-14  by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 2,001 national adults age 18, including 1,576 registered voters.

Americans Hold Favorable Views on Business but not CEOs    Wednesday, November 16, 2011
The Public Affairs Pulse survey - a first of-its-kind, in-depth survey of Americans' opinions on business and government, commissioned by the Public Affairs Council - provides insight on attitudes toward issues ranging from corporate compensation and business's role in providing public services to crisis communication and lobbying. Among the survey's most noteworthy findings, more than six in 10 Americans have a favorable view of major companies. Nearly three-quarters say companies are doing a good job of providing useful products and services. Yet despite their overall positive view, Americans also see much to dislike. Many think CEOs are paid too much, while regular workers and lower-level managers are paid less than they deserve. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted August 10 to September 8, 2011 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,753 adults age 18 and older living in the continental U.S.


Fewer Hearing Mostly Bad News about Economy, Penn State Scandal Tops Public's News Interest    Wednesday, November 16, 2011
The Penn State child sex abuse scandal topped the public's news interest last week, but Americans also continued to closely track news about the nation's economy. The public's perceptions of economic news, which took a decided downturn in August, are much less negative today. Currently, 48% say they are hearing mostly bad news about the economy, down from 58% in October and 67% in August. Still, very few Americans say news about the economy is mostly good (3%). Nearly half (48%) see the news as a mix of good and bad. The latest weekly News Interest Index survey by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press finds that 32% say they followed news about the Penn State scandal, which led to the firing of legendary football coach, Joe Paterno, more closely than any other news. By comparison, 18% cite news about the economy as their top story while 12% cite sexual harassment accusations against GOP presidential candidate Herman Cain. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted November 10-13, 2011 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,000 adults 18 and older, including 189 without a landline phone.


Why Americans use social media    Tuesday, November 15, 2011
Two-thirds of online adults (66%) use social media platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, MySpace or LinkedIn. These internet users say that connections with family members and friends (both new and old) are a primary consideration in their adoption of social media tools. Roughly two thirds of social media users say that staying in touch with current friends and family members is a major reason they use these sites, while half say that connecting with old friends they’ve lost touch with is a major reason behind their use of these technologies. The results reported here are based on a national telephone survey of 2,277 adults conducted April 26-May 22, 2011. 1,522 interviews were conducted by landline phone, and 755 interviews were conducted by cell phone. Interviews were conducted in both English and Spanish.

Public Split on Parties' Super Committee Ideas     Wednesday, November 09, 2011
With the super committee scheduled to report its findings to Congress in just two weeks, the latest United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection poll finds that slightly more Americans favor a Democratic proposal to pare the deficit with cuts and revenue increases on the wealthy rather than a cuts-only approach. By a margin of 49 percent to 44 percent, the public favored the Democratic plan suggested earlier this month that would include "$4 trillion in deficit reduction through a combination of federal spending cuts and tax increases on wealthier Americans" over a "Republican plan that calls for $3 trillion in deficit reduction through spending cuts alone, with no tax increases." A small number of voters - 7 percent - said neither one, said they don't know, or refused to answer. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted November 3-6, 2011 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,005 adults age 18 and older living in the continental U.S., including 404 cell phone interviews.


Teens, kindness and cruelty on social network sites    Wednesday, November 09, 2011
Social media use has become so pervasive in the lives of American teens that having a presence on a social network site is almost synonymous with being online. Fully 95% of all teens ages 12-17 are now online and 80% of those online teens are users of social media sites. Many log on daily to their social network pages and these have become spaces where much of the social activity of teen life is echoed and amplified—in both good and bad ways. The data discussed in this report are the result of a three-part, multi-modal study that included interviews with experts, seven focus groups with middle and high school students, and a nationally representative random-digit-dial telephone survey of teens and parents. The survey was fielded April 19 through July 14, 2011, and was administered by landline and cell phone, in English and Spanish, to 799 teens ages 12-17 and a parent or guardian. Black and Latino families were oversampled.

Public Doubts Congress Will Aid Economy    Tuesday, November 08, 2011
With time ticking down on the first session of the 112th Congress, Americans generally prefer that Congress act on priorities supported by Democratic members and the White House, but they are very pessimistic about any of these initiatives actually being realized before the end of the year, according to the latest  United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection poll. The public's low expectations for Congress combined with what a large number of surveys show is a sour public mood - dissatisfied with the economy and even more so with political leaders - don't show signs of abating, but there are ideas that curry favor with the public. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted November 3-6, 2011 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,005 adults age 18 and older living in the continental U.S., including 404 cell phone interviews.


39% Think Cain Allegations True, 24% False    Monday, November 07, 2011
Americans who have heard about the sexual harassment allegations against Republican presidential candidate Herman Cain, on balance, think they are true rather than false, according to the latest survey by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press. At the same time, a plurality thinks that recent coverage of Cain has been fair. While Republicans and Democrats are about equally likely to have heard about the allegations against Cain, they have different impressions of the news - and of the coverage. Among those who have heard at least a little about this, Democrats and independents who lean Democratic are much more likely than Republicans and independents who lean Republican to say they think the accusations are true. Republicans and independents who lean Republican are much more likely to say media coverage has been too tough. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted November 3-6, 2011 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,005 adults age 18 and older, including 404 cell phone interviews.

If Public Funds New Stadium, Gambling is Top Choice    Monday, November 07, 2011
Minnesotans much prefer using new forms of gambling revenue to pay for a new Vikings stadium instead of higher taxes, a Star Tribune Minnesota Poll has found. The poll showed widespread public support for everything from a state lottery scratch-off game to slots at horse-racing tracks and electronic pulltabs in bars and restaurants. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted November 2-3, 2011 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a sample of 807 Minnesota adults age 18 and older, including 281 cell phone interviews.


Angry Silents, Disengaged Millennials: The Generation Gap and the 2012 Election    Thursday, November 03, 2011
Not since 1972 has generation played such a significant role in voter preferences as it has in recent elections. Younger people have voted substantially more Democratic in each election since 2004, while older voters have cast more ballots for Republican candidates in each election since 2006. A new Pew Research Center study suggests this pattern may well continue in 2012. Millennial voters are inclined to back President Barack Obama by a wide margin in a potential matchup against former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney, while Silent generation voters are solidly behind Romney. Baby Boomers and Generation X voters, who are the most anxious about the uncertain economic times, are on the fence about a second term for Obama. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews in two separate major national surveys conducted September 1-15, 2011 and September 22-October 4, 2011 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a total sample of 4,413 adults.


Voters Evenly Split on GOP House, Obama    Wednesday, November 02, 2011
Underscoring widespread discontent with all political leaders, registered voters now divide almost exactly in half on whether President Obama and the Republican majority in the House of Representatives each deserve another term in power, according to the latest United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection poll. Asked what outcome they would prefer in the 2012 presidential election, 44 percent of registered voters said they would like to see a Republican elected, while 42% want Obama to win a second term - a finding within the survey's margin of error. Asked if Republicans should retain control of the House, 41% said yes and 43% said they would prefer Democrats to recapture the majority - also within the poll's margin of error. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted October 27-30, 2011 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,002 adults age 18 and older living in the continental U.S., including 385 cell phone interviews.


Kaiser Health Tracking Poll - October 2011    Friday, October 28, 2011
The October health tracking poll finds a more negative overall public mood about the health reform law, driven largely by changes in support for the law among Democrats.  The poll also asked the public's impressions of the Massachusetts health reform law enacted under then- Gov. Mitt Romney, who is now a candidate for the Republican presidential nomination. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews (landline and cell) conducted October 13-18, 2011 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International in English and Spanish among 1,223 national adults age 18 and older.

The Tablet Revolution and What it Means for the Future of News    Thursday, October 27, 2011
Eleven percent of adults now own a tablet computer. About half get news on it everyday, and three in ten spend more time consuming news than they did before. But contrary to what some in the news industry hoped, a majority say they are not willing to pay for news content on the devices, according to the most detailed study to date of tablet users and their news consumption habits. The study, conducted by the Project for Excellence in Journalism in collaboration with The Economist Group, finds that the vast majority of tablet owners - fully 77% - use their tablet every day. They spend an average of about 90 minutes on them. The results are based on data collected from seven telephone and web-based surveys of national adults and tablet users under the direction of Princeton Survey  Research Associates International in the summer of 2011.

Public Divided Over Occupy Wall Street Movement, Tea Party Draws More Opposition than Support    Tuesday, October 25, 2011
About four-in-ten Americans say they support the Occupy Wall Street movement (39%), while nearly as many (35%) say they oppose the movement launched last month in New York’s financial district. By contrast, more say they oppose the Tea Party movement than support it (44% vs. 32%), according to the latest survey by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press and The Washington Post. One-in-ten (10%) say they support both, while 14% say they oppose both. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted October 20-23, 2011 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,009 adults age 18 or older living in the continental U.S., including 403 cell phone interviews.

Occupy D.C.? Most Back Protests, Surtax     Wednesday, October 19, 2011
At a time when protests have erupted across the country over a growing inequality of wealth and Congress is considering measures to impose a surtax on those earning more than $1 million annually, the public seems to be in a populist mood—one that’s tempered by skepticism about Washington’s ability to do anything about the grim economy.

A new survey shows that Americans overwhelmingly support the self-styled Occupy Wall Street protests that not only have disrupted life in Lower Manhattan but also in Washington and cities and towns across the U.S. and in other nations. Some 59 percent of adults either completely agree or mostly agree with the protesters, while 31 percent mostly disagree or completely disagree; 10 percent of those surveyed didn’t know or refused to answer. What’s more, many people are paying attention to the rallies. Almost two-thirds of respondents—65 percent—said they’ve heard “a lot” or “some” about the rallies, while 35 percent have said they’ve heard or seen “not too much” or “nothing at all” about the demonstrations. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted October 13-16, 2011 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,007 adults age 18 or older living in the continental U.S., including 403 cell phone interviews.

A Third in GOP Have Seen a Presidential Debate: Most See Debates as Helpful    Tuesday, October 18, 2011
About a quarter of the public (27%) says they have watched one or more of the Republican presidential debates so far this year. Most debate watchers say the televised sessions have been helpful in learning about the candidates (61%) and a third (34%) say the debates have led them to change their minds about which candidate they might support. Four years ago, in July 2007, 40% said they had watched any presidential debate – whether Democratic or Republican – at that early point in the campaign. In that cycle both parties had wide open races and a number of debates took place early on. Looking back to 2004, when only the Democrats had a primary contest, only 20% said they had watched any of the Democratic debates as of January 2004.

According to the latest survey by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press, about a third (36%) of Republicans say they have watched a debate this year, which is comparable to the number that said this in July 2007 (38%). Interest among Democrats and independents is understandably much lower, with only a quarter of Democrats (25%) and independents (24%) reporting that they have watched any of the debates.  This compares to significantly broader viewership in 2007 (45% of Democrats and 38% of independents) in July 2007, when there were contested primaries in both parties. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted October 13-16, 2011 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,007 adults age 18 or older living in the continental US., including 403 cell phone interviews.

In Both Parties, a Schism on Trade    Tuesday, October 18, 2011
In the wake of congressional passage of three long-delayed free-trade deals, voters are divided over those agreements, and they are also at odds over a measure designed to change China’s currency policies, according to a new survey. The voters’ conflicting views are echoed among the very highest officeholders. For instance the Obama administration was joined by congressional Republican leaders in supporting the trade deals with South Korea, Colombia, and Panama, while voters opposed them, 41 percent to 38 percent, with a combined 21 percent saying they did not know or refusing to answer. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., opposed all three and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., opposed the Colombia deal. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted October 13-16, 2011 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,007 adults age 18 or older living in the continental U.S., including 403 cell phone interviews.

Wall Street Protests Receive Limited Attention: Public Remains Focused on Economic Conditions    Friday, October 14, 2011
Americans continued to closely track news about the nation’s struggling economy last week, and paid only modest attention to a fast- growing media story – the anti-Wall Street protests in New York and other cities. About a quarter (27%) say news about the condition of the U.S. economy was their top story, while just 7% cite the Occupy Wall Street protests as their top story. Looking at a separate measure, 43% say they followed economic news very closely, compared with 17% for the protests, according to the latest weekly News Interest Index survey by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted October 6-9, 2011 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,000 adults age 18 or older living in the continental U.S., including 400 cell phone interviews.

More see crisis ahead; GOP fractured on best candidate to fix economy    Monday, October 10, 2011
Most Americans now see a 2008-style financial crisis on the horizon, and —reflecting the deep partisan divide in the country —there is no consensus about whether a second term for President Obama or a Republican administration would improve the rough economic situation, according to a new Washington Post-Bloomberg News poll. Republicans, for their part, are not conflicted: nearly two-thirds are confident the economy would be better under a GOP president and sense their own financial situations would improve with a Republican win in 2012. Democrats are less sure the economy is better under Obama’s leadership, and most independents say it would not make much difference one way or the other. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted October 6-9, 2011 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,000 adults, including 400 cell phone interviews.

New poll from Institutes of Politics at Harvard, Saint Anselm finds Romney leading in NH Primary field by 18 points    Monday, October 10, 2011
A new poll by the Institute of Politics (IOP) at Harvard University and the New Hampshire Institute of Politics at Saint Anselm College shows former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney leading the candidate field with 38 percent among likely voters in the New Hampshire Republican presidential primary. Businessman Herman Cain (20%) and U.S. Representative Ron Paul (13%) follow, with all remaining candidates polling at 5 percent or less. The poll''''s 648 telephone interviews (landline and cell phone lines) with likely voters in the New Hampshire Republican primary for President were conducted between Sunday, Oct. 2 and Thursday, Oct. 6, 2011. The poll has a margin of error of +/- 4.4 percentage points.

Obama Motivates Supporters, Opponents in Early 2012 Matchups     Thursday, October 06, 2011
According to the latest national survey by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press, Barack Obama is a leading driver of voter preferences in possible 2012 matchups, among both his supporters and opponents. Currently, Obama is running a close race in hypothetical matchups against Mitt Romney and Rick Perry. Against both GOP candidates, most of Obama''''s supporters view their vote as a vote for the president, while most of those who plan to vote for Romney or Perry see their vote as a vote against Obama. Given a choice between Obama and Romney, 48% of registered voters say they would vote for Romney or lean toward Romney, while an identical percentage supports Obama or leans toward Obama. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted September 22-October 4, 2011 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among 2,410 adults, including 1,901 registered voters.

Bachmann Finds Support for Position on HPV Injections    Wednesday, October 05, 2011
Rep. Michele Bachmann, R-Minn., would have wide support for her position denouncing a onetime Texas requirement that girls entering the sixth grade be inoculated against a virus that can cause cervical cancer in women. According to the latest United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection poll, a firm majority of voters—57 percent—oppose the Texas policy that made the injections mandatory unless a parent or legal guardian requested that they not receive them. The requirement has been vigorously defended by Gov. Rick Perry, R-Texas, who is battling Bachmann for the Republican presidential nomination; he has said he would err on “the side of life” in the fight against the human papillomavirus, or HPV. Bachmann has suggested that the vaccine causes mental retardation, although the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention contends there’s no evidence of that. The report is based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted by Princeton Survey Research Associates International from September 29-October 2, 2011 among a national sample of 1,000 adults age 18 or older living in the continental U.S., including 400 cell phone interviews.

Voters of Two Minds on Federal Regulation    Tuesday, October 04, 2011
A majority of voters worry that government regulation of business has gone too far and is hurting the economy, but most also remain reluctant to block several of the key rules that congressional Republicans want to reverse, according to the latest United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection Poll. On many questions relating to Washington’s role, voters expressed the mix of views that political scientists often describe as philosophically conservative and operationally liberal: Though skeptical of regulation in principle, Americans are open to it in practice. The poll also found that these issues carved fissures of opinion along lines of gender, race, education, and age that could complicate their electoral impact. The report is based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted by Princeton Survey Research Associates International from September 29-October 2, 2011 among a national sample of 1,000 adults age 18 or older living in the continental U.S., including 400 cell phone interviews.

UMass-Lowell/Herald poll: Elizabeth Warren, Scott Brown in dead heat    Monday, October 03, 2011
Democrat Elizabeth Warren’s meteoric ascent in Massachusetts politics has landed her in a virtual dead heat with Republican U.S. Sen. Scott Brown, while two Democrats who passed on the race — Gov. Deval Patrick and former U.S. Rep. Joseph P. Kennedy II — could pose even bigger threats to the GOP incumbent, a new UMass-Lowell/Boston Herald poll shows. Brown is ahead of Warren by a 41-38 percent margin in a general election trial heat, a statistical tie given the poll’s 3.8 percent margin of error. Warren, who announced her campaign just last month, faces her first crucial test Tuesday night in a Democratic debate sponsored by University of Massachusetts at Lowell and the Herald. The poll of 1,005 registered Massachusetts voters was conducted September 22-28, 2011 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International.

Obama Draws More Confidence than GOP Leaders on Deficit    Monday, September 26, 2011
As the nation prepares for another round of deficit reduction debates, the public’s confidence in congressional leaders, particularly Republican leaders in Congress, has plummeted. Just 35% say they have a great deal or fair amount of confidence in Republican leaders in Congress to do the right thing when it comes to dealing with the federal budget deficit, down from 47% in May. Public confidence in Barack Obama on the budget deficit, by comparison, has remained largely unchanged. The latest national survey by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press, conducted Sept. 22-25 among 1,000 adults finds that 52% express at least a fair amount of confidence in Obama to do the right thing when it comes to dealing with the deficit, virtually unchanged from 55% earlier in the year.

Press Widely Criticized, But Trusted More than Other Information Sources     Sunday, September 25, 2011
According to the latest biennial news attitudes survey conducted by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press, negative opinions about the performance of news organizations now equal or surpass all-time highs on nine of 12 core measures the Pew Research Center has been tracking since 1985. However, these bleak findings are put into some perspective by the fact that news organizations are more trusted sources of information than are many other institutions, including government and business. Further, people rate the performance of the news organizations they rely on much more positively than they rate the performance of news organizations generally. The report is based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted by Princeton Survey Research Associates International in English and Spanish from July 20-24, 2011 among a national sample of 1,501 adults age 18 or older living in the continental U.S., including 585 cell phone interviews.

Voters Favor Balance in Cutting Deficit     Wednesday, September 21, 2011
As President Obama challenged congressional Republicans with his new deficit plan on Monday, voters are rejecting the idea of reducing the nation’s debt through spending cuts alone—but there is no clear-cut enthusiasm for any specific proposal offered by either political party and even less confidence in their ability to get things done. According to the latest United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection poll, when asked if the congressional super committee that is charged with recommending at least $1.2 trillion in reductions from the deficit should rely “entirely on spending cuts without any tax increases,” only 28 percent of voters said yes. The cuts-only position is basically the one offered by the Republican leadership in Congress and by the candidates seeking the Republican presidential nomination. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted by Princeton Survey Research Associates International from September 15-18, 2011 among a national sample of 1,006 adults age 18 or older living in the continental U.S., including 402 cell phone interviews.

With Doubts, Voters Prefer Obama Jobs Plan    Tuesday, September 13, 2011
Despite deepening doubts about President Obama’s economic agenda, Americans generally prefer the proposals he offered last week for reviving the economy to the competing ideas advanced by congressional Republicans and the GOP’s 2012 presidential field. According to the latest United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection poll, Americans remain unconvinced that either party’s agenda can significantly dent the nation’s longest period of sustained unemployment since the Depression. The share of Americans who said that Obama’s policies have compounded economic difficulties was nearly double the portion who said he has improved conditions. And just one-in-six said they expected the jobs plan he sent to Congress will significantly reduce unemployment. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted by Princeton Survey Research Associates International from September 8-11, 2011 among a national sample of 1,010 adults age 18 or older living in the continental U.S., including 402 cell phone interviews.

Primetime Terror: How TV Dramas Depict the War on Terror and the War on Drugs    Thursday, September 08, 2011
This just-completed study for the ACLU and the Norman Lear Center, which provides a surprising portrait of the War on Terror and the War on Drugs as seen in TV dramas, says that America's most popular shows stayed closer to reality than common stereotypes about what terrorists and drug users look like and what drugs Americans are abusing. But these ripped-from-the-headlines crime shows largely left out the basic mechanisms of the justice system: the reading of Miranda rights, and the presence of lawyers at interrogations, trials and punishment. The study analyzed 49 hours of 10 top-rated TV series with storylines including terrorism or drugs that aired in 2010. Shows included NCIS, CSI: Miami, 24, Law & Order: SVU, House and The Good Wife.

Few See Job Proposals Having Much Effect    Wednesday, September 07, 2011
When asked which economic issue worries them most, nearly twice as many Americans cite the job situation as the federal budget deficit (43% to 22%). There is less clarity in the public’s views about ideas to address the job situation – many are seen as helping at least a little, but no specific proposal emerges as a silver bullet. The latest survey by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press and The Washington Post finds that large majorities say additional spending on infrastructure, cutting the federal budget deficit and tax cuts for businesses and individuals would do at least a little to improve the job situation. But there is no consensus that any of these ideas would do a lot to help. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted by Princeton Survey Research Associates International from September 1-4, 2011 among a national sample of 1,001 adults age 18 or older living in the continental U.S., including 400 cell phone interviews.

August Health Tracking    Monday, August 29, 2011
The August tracking poll examines the views of Americans without health insurance, with a particular focus on how they think the health reform law will affect them. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted by Princeton Survey Research Associates International from August 10-15, 2011 among a national sample of 1,201 adults age 18 or older living in the continental U.S., including 501 cell phone interviews.

Obama Leadership Image Takes a Hit, GOP Ratings Decline     Thursday, August 25, 2011
The public is profoundly discontented with conditions in the country, its government, political leadership and several of its major institutions. Fully 79% are dissatisfied with the way things are going in the country. Even more (86%) say they are frustrated or angry with the federal government. Favorable ratings for both political parties are in negative territory and have declined since the beginning of the year. Just 22% approve of the job performance of Republican congressional leaders, down from 36% in February. Ratings for Democratic leaders are only somewhat better (29% approve). The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted August 17-21, 2011 by Princeton Survey Research Associates International among a national sample of 1,509 adults age 18 or older, including 604 cell phone interviews.

Democrats Not Eager for an Obama Challenger    Wednesday, August 10, 2011
Despite speculation that the Democratic base has become increasingly disillusioned with Barack Obama, rank-and-file Democrats are not eager to see other candidates challenge him for their party’s nomination in 2012. Just 32% of Democrats and Democratic-leaning independents say they would like other Democrats to take on Obama for the nomination, while 59% say they would not. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted by Princeton Survey Research Associates International from August 4-7, 2011 among a national sample of 1,001 adults age 18 or older living in the continental U.S., including 400 cell phone interviews.

Views of Tea Party Supporters in Congress Grow More Negative    Tuesday, August 09, 2011
More Americans now think that members of Congress who support the Tea Party are having a negative effect than said that in January, at the start of the new Congress. Currently, according to the latest survey by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press and The Washington Post, 29% judge the impact of Tea Party supporters as mostly negative compared with 22% who see their impact as mostly positive. At the beginning of the year, the balance of opinion was just the opposite: 27% said that Tea Party members in Congress would have a positive impact, while 18% expected a negative effect. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted by Princeton Survey Research Associates International from August 4-7, 2011 among a national sample of 1,001 adults age 18 or older living in the continental U.S., including 400 cell phone interviews.

National Journal Daily: Amidst Debt Fight, Discontent with Congress    Wednesday, August 03, 2011
Amidst a tumultuous fight over raising the debt ceiling, Americans are deeply dissatisfied with Washington and eager to elect fresh faces to Congress, raising warning flags for Democrats and Republicans alike. The latest United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection poll showed discontent at about the same levels seen in the 2006 and 2010 “wave” elections. The results are based on data from telephone interviews conducted by Princeton Survey Research Associates International from July 28-31, 2011 among a national sample of 1,001 adults age 18 or older living in the continental U.S., including 401 cell phone interviews.

Public Sees Budget Negotiations as “Ridiculous”, “Disgusting”, “Stupid"    Monday, August 01, 2011
From liberal Democrats to Tea Party Republicans, there is broad public consensus that the budget negotiations of recent weeks can be summed up in words such as ridiculous, disgusting, stupid, and frustrating. Nationwide, 72% describe the recent negotiations in negative terms such as these; while very few offer a positive (2%), or even neutral (11%) assessment, according to the latest survey by the Pew Research Center for the People and the Press and The Washington Post. Other frequently used terms include terrible, disappointing, childish, and joke. The results are based on data from telephone interviews conducted by Princeton Survey Research Associates International from July 28-31, 2011 among a national sample of 1,001 adults age 18 or older living in the continental U.S., including 401 cell phone interviews.

July Health Tracking    Thursday, July 28, 2011
Health care, and particularly Medicare and Medicaid, continue to play a role in the national discussion over the federal budget deficit. In the midst of this debate, the latest Kaiser Health Tracking poll finds that Americans of all political stripes see a role for both spending reductions and tax increases as part of an overall deficit reduction strategy. The results are based on data collected from telephone interviews conducted by Princeton Survey Research Associates International from July 13-18, 2011 among a national sample of 1,201 adults age 18 or older living in the continental U.S., including 401 cell phone interviews.


Obama Loses Ground in 2012 Reelection Bid    Thursday, July 28, 2011
The sizeable lead Barack Obama held over a generic Republican opponent in polls conducted earlier this year has vanished as his support among independent voters has fallen off. Currently, 41% of registered voters say they would like to see Barack Obama reelected, while 40% say they would prefer to see a Republican candidate win in 2012. In May, Obama held an 11-point lead. The results are based on data from telephone interviews conducted by Princeton Survey Research Associates International in English and Spanish from July 20-24, 2011 among a national sample of 1,501 adults age 18 and older living in the continental U.S, including 585 cell phone interviews.

National Journal Daily: First in a Series of Surveys Tracking the Public's Priorities for Congress    Tuesday, July 26, 2011
Americans expressed more trust in President Obama than in congressional Republicans to make decisions about both the federal deficit and debt ceiling, but continued to display little urgency about the risk of default if the two sides remain stalemated, a new United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection Poll found. The results are based on data from telephone interviews conducted by Princeton Survey Research Associates International from July 21-24, 2011 among a national sample of 999 adults age 18 and older living in the continental U.S., including 397 cell phone interviews.

Public Now Divided on Debt Limit Debate    Tuesday, July 12, 2011
As the debate over the nation’s debt and deficit continues, the public has grown more concerned that failing to raise the debt limit would force the government into default and hurt the economy. Despite this change, however, about as many Americans are concerned by the consequences of raising the nation’s debt limit as by the fallout from not doing so according to the latest survey by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press and the Washington Post.

Currently, 47% say their greater concern is that raising the debt limit would lead to higher government spending and make the national debt bigger, while 42% say their greater concern is that not raising the limit would force the government into default and hurt the economy. This represents a change in the balance of opinion since May, when more expressed concern over raising the debt limit (48%) than said their greater concern was the prospect of a government default (35%). The results are based on data from telephone interviews conducted by Princeton Survey Research Associates International from July 7-10, 2011 among a national sample of 1,007 adults age 18 and older living in the continental U.S., including 333 cell phone interviews.

Majority Sees U.S. Leadership in Space as Essential    Tuesday, July 05, 2011
On the eve of the final mission of the U.S. space shuttle program, most Americans say the United States must be at the forefront of future space exploration. Fifty years after the first American manned space flight, nearly six-in-ten (58%) say it is essential that the United States continue to be a world leader in space exploration; about four-in-ten say this is not essential (38%).

June Health Tracking    Thursday, June 30, 2011
The June Kaiser Health Tracking Poll examines the opinions of seniors and the public about Medicare and the federal budget deficit, a topic of heightened interest these days as policymakers in Washington focus on ways to bring down Medicare spending as part of efforts to reduce the deficit. The poll also provides an early look at the views of registered voters and the potential role health care might play in the upcoming presidential election cycle.

Little Change in Views of Obama's Approach for Afghanistan Troop Withdrawal     Monday, June 27, 2011
Following Barack Obama’s June 22 speech about the Afghanistan war, there has been little change in public opinion about the president’s plans for drawing down the number of U.S. combat troops in that country. As in early March, a plurality (44%) says they think Obama will remove troops at about the right pace. About three-in-ten (29%) think he will not withdraw them quickly enough, while 16% say troops will be removed too quickly, according to the latest survey by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press and The Washington Post. The results are based on data from telephone interviews conducted by Princeton Survey Research Associates International in English from June 23-26, 2011 among a national sample of 1,005 adults age 18 and older living in the continental U.S., including 333 cell phone interviews.

HIV/AIDS At 30: A Public Opinion Perspective    Tuesday, June 21, 2011
As the HIV/AIDS epidemic marks its thirtieth year, the Kaiser Family Foundation conducted its eighth large-scale national survey of Americans on HIV/AIDS. Key findings include: Black Americans, and particularly young blacks, express much higher levels of concern about HIV infection than whites. Reported HIV testing rates are flat since 1997, including among some key groups at higher risk. Thirty years into the epidemic, there is a declining sense of national urgency and visibility of HIV/AIDS.

Record Number Favors Removing U.S. Troops from Afghanistan    Tuesday, June 21, 2011
As President Obama prepares to announce his policy for drawing down U.S. forces in Afghanistan, the percentage of Americans who favor removing the troops as soon as possible has reached an all-time high in Pew Research Center surveys. For the first time, a majority (56%) says that U.S. troops should be brought home as soon as possible, while 39% favor keeping troops in Afghanistan until the situation has stabilized. According to the latest national survey by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press, the proportion favoring a quick withdrawal of U.S. forces has increased by eight points since last month (from 48%), immediately after the killing of Osama bin Laden. A year ago, just 40% favored removing the troops as soon as possible, while 53% favored keeping them in Afghanistan until the situation stabilized. The results are based on data from telephone interviews conducted in English and Spanish by Princeton Survey Research Associates International from June 15-19, 2011 among a national sample of 1,502 adults age 18 or older living in the continental U.S., including 501 cell phone interviews.

More Say GOP Would Be Mainly Responsible If No Increase In Debt Limit    Monday, June 20, 2011
More Americans believe Republicans in Congress, rather than the Obama administration, would be mainly responsible if the two sides cannot agree on a plan to increase the federal debt limit. About four-in-ten (42%) say Republicans would bear the most responsibility if the debt limit is not raised and the government is unable to borrow more money to fund its operations. A third (33%) say the Obama administration would be mainly responsible.

Most Say Political Sex Scandals Due to Greater Scrutiny, Not Lower Morality     Wednesday, June 15, 2011
Most Americans attribute the series of public sex scandals in recent years involving politicians more to the heightened scrutiny they face than to lower moral standards among elected officials. A 57% majority say elected officials just get caught more often because they are under greater scrutiny. About two-in-ten (19%), on the other hand, say elected officials have lower moral standards than ordinary Americans, according to the latest national survey by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press and The Washington Post. The results are based on data from telephone interviews conducted by Princeton Survey Research Associates International in English from June 9-12, 2011 among a national sample of 1,002 adults age 18 and older, including 330 cell phone interviews.

Opposition to Ryan Medicare Plan from Older, Attentive Americans    Monday, June 06, 2011
The public offers a mixed reaction to a proposal to change Medicare into a program that would give future participants a credit toward purchasing private health insurance coverage: 41% oppose such a change, 36% favor it, and nearly a quarter (23%) have no opinion either way. Despite this even division of opinion overall, there is broad, and strong, opposition to the proposal among older Americans, and those who are paying a lot of attention to the issue. Those ages 50 and older oppose this proposal, which is part of Rep. Paul Ryan’s deficit reduction plan, by a 51% to 29% margin. And this opposition is intense: 42% strongly oppose this kind of change, while only 19% strongly favor it. The same is true among people who say they have heard a lot about this proposal – fully 56% are opposed while 33% are in favor, and strong opposition among this group outweighs strong support by two-to-one (50% vs. 25%).

Republican Candidates Stir Little Enthusiasm     Thursday, June 02, 2011
The emerging Republican presidential field draws tepid ratings. Just a quarter of voters (25%) have an excellent or good impression of the possible GOP candidates, and a separate survey conducted jointly by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press with The Washington Post finds that negative descriptions of the field far outnumber positive ones. Asked for a single word to describe the GOP field, the top response is “unimpressed.” Of the party’s best-known possible candidates, only Mitt Romney has broad potential appeal. Large majorities have heard of four possible Republican candidates – Romney, Sarah Palin, Newt Gingrich and Ron Paul. But most who have heard of Palin and Gingrich say there is no chance they would vote for them (63% each). About as many (60%) say there is no chance they would support Paul. The results are based on data from telephone interviews conducted by Princeton Survey Research Associates International from May 25 - May 30, 2011 among a national sample of 1,509 adults age 18 and older, including 505 cell phone interviews. Interviews were conducted in English.

Twitter Update 2011    Wednesday, June 01, 2011

13% of online adults use the status update service Twitter, which represents a significant increase from the 8% of online adults who identified themselves as Twitter users in November 2010. 95% of Twitter users own a mobile phone, and half of these users access the service on their handheld device. These findings come from national survey findings from a poll conducted for the Pew Research Center's Internet and American Life Project.



Internet phone calls    Monday, May 30, 2011

After years of modest activity, online phone calling has taken off as a quarter of American adult internet users (24%) have placed phone calls online. That amounts to 19% of all American adults. On any given day 5% of internet users are going online to place phone calls. Both figures are marked increases from previous readings in surveys by the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project.



May Health Tracking    Wednesday, May 25, 2011
Most Americans oppose the idea of converting Medicaid to block grant financing to reduce the federal deficit, and more than half want to see no reductions at all in Medicaid spending. One in five adults has received Medicaid benefits over time, and for most, experiences were positive, although one third of them report having had problems finding a doctor. The findings come at a time of intense public debate in Washington about the future of entitlement programs such as Medicare and Medicaid as policymakers attempt to address rising public concerns about the federal deficit. While conventional wisdom and recent public opinion polling has suggested that dramatic changes in Medicare would be politically unpopular, the poll findings illustrate that major alterations to Medicaid also could strike a negative chord with many Americans.

More Concern about Raising Debt Limit than Government Default    Tuesday, May 24, 2011
The public is concerned about both of the possible outcomes of the debt limit debate – raising the debt limit and failing to do so. But more say they are very concerned about the possible consequences of raising the debt limit than of not raising it. And by a 48% to 35% margin, Americans say their greater concern is that raising the debt limit would lead to higher government spending and a larger national debt than that not raising the limit would force the government into default and hurt the nation’s economy.

Interest in bin Laden Now Tops News Coverage    Wednesday, May 18, 2011
Public interest in the killing of Osama bin Laden has declined since the week U.S. forces raided his compound in Pakistan. But news coverage of bin Laden’s death has fallen more precipitously. About a third of the public (32%) says they followed this news more closely than any other story last week, down from 42% one week earlier. The proportion saying they followed this story very closely also has fallen, from 50% to 37%.

Is College Worth It?     Sunday, May 15, 2011
A majority of Americans (57%) say the higher education system in the United States fails to provide good value for the money students and their families spend, and about four-in-ten college presidents say the system is headed in the wrong direction, according to a pair of nationwide surveys conducted by the Pew Research Center in Spring 2011. One is a telephone survey taken among a nationally representative sample of 2,142 adults ages 18 and older. The other is an online survey, done in association with the Chronicle of Higher Education, among the presidents of 1,055 two-year and four-year private, public, and for-profit colleges and universities.

Death of bin Laden: More Coverage than Interest    Wednesday, May 11, 2011
While the killing of Osama bin Laden in Pakistan by U.S. military forces attracted a near-record amount of news coverage, public interest in the story has been comparatively modest. Just more than four-in-ten (42%) say they followed news about the Al Qaeda leader’s killing more closely than any other news last week. One-in-five (20%) followed news about severe weather and flooding in the South and Midwest most closely. Bin Laden’s death is clearly the week’s top story, but it is not the top story for 2011. In mid-March, far more (57%) said they followed the Japan earthquake and nuclear disaster most closely.

Obama Bump Recedes a Bit    Monday, May 09, 2011
Barack Obama’s job approval rating has fallen slightly since the day after Osama bin Laden’s death was announced. But the balance of opinion regarding Obama’s job performance remains more positive than it was in early April. There also continues to be more optimism about the U.S. achieving its goals in Afghanistan than there was prior to bin Laden’s killing. Currently, 50% approve of the way Obama is handling his job as president while 39% disapprove. In a May 2 poll by the Pew Research Center and The Washington Post, 56% approved while 38% disapproved. Obama’s current job rating represents an improvement from early April, when 47% approved of his job performance and nearly as many (45%) disapproved.

Beyond Red vs. Blue: The Political Typology    Wednesday, May 04, 2011
With the economy still struggling and the nation involved in multiple military operations overseas, the public’s political mood is fractious. In this environment, many political attitudes have become more doctrinaire at both ends of the ideological spectrum, a polarization that reflects the current atmosphere in Washington. Yet at the same time, a growing number of Americans are choosing not to identify with either political party, and the center of the political spectrum is increasingly diverse. Rather than being moderate, many of these independents hold extremely strong ideological positions on issues such as the role of government, immigration, the environment and social issues. But they combine these views in ways that defy liberal or conservative orthodoxy.

April Health Tracking    Wednesday, April 27, 2011
As Congress and the president debate different approaches to reducing the deficit, a new survey indicates that initial public reaction is fairly evenly split when a premium support/voucher program like the one in House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan’s "Path to Prosperity" proposal is described, but seniors prefer to keep the current Medicare system by a 2-to-1 margin. Meanwhile, public opinion on the health reform law remains remarkably steady.

Trump Most Visible Among Possible GOP Contenders    Wednesday, April 20, 2011
Donald Trump has drawn a lot of attention in a slow-starting race for the GOP nomination. Roughly a quarter of all Americans (26%) name Trump as the possible Republican presidential candidate they have heard most about lately, far more than volunteer any other candidate. Among Republicans, 39% name Trump as most visible – more than all other possible GOP candidates combined. To be sure, Trump is standing out in a contest that has yet to draw much public interest or media coverage. In fact, about half of all Americans (53%) could not name anyone when asked which GOP candidate they have been hearing the most about.

Budget Negotiations in a Word - "Ridiculous"    Monday, April 11, 2011
The public has an overwhelmingly negative reaction to the budget negotiations that narrowly avoided a government shutdown. A new survey finds that “ridiculous” is the word used most frequently to describe the budget negotiations, followed by “disgusting,” “frustrating,” “messy,” “disappointing” and “stupid.” Overall, 69% of respondents use negative terms to describe the budget talks, while just 3% use positive words; 16% use neutral words to characterize their impressions of the negotiations. Large majorities of independents (74%), Democrats (69%) and Republicans (65%) offer negative terms to describe the negotiations.

Civil War at 150: Still Relevant, Still Divisive     Friday, April 08, 2011
As the 150th anniversary of the start of the Civil War approaches, most Americans say the war between the North and South is still relevant to American politics and public life today. More than half of Americans (56%) say the Civil War is still relevant, according to a new national survey. Nearly four-in-ten (39%) say the Civil War is important historically but has little current relevance. In a nation that has long endured deep racial divisions, the history of that era still elicits some strong reactions. Nearly half of the public (46%) says it is inappropriate for today’s public officials to praise the leaders of the Confederate states during the war; 36% say such statements are appropriate.

Economic Views Sag, Obama Rating Slips     Thursday, April 07, 2011
With the public growing more anxious about the economy and concerned about overseas commitments, Barack Obama’s job rating has edged lower. About as many now approve (47%) as disapprove (45%) of the way Obama is handling his job as president. In March, opinions about Obama’s job performance were more positive; 51% approved of his job performance and 39% disapproved. The current measure is similar to Obama’s ratings from last fall through early 2011. Despite recent signs of job growth, Americans are taking a more negative view of the national economy. The proportion rating economic conditions as “poor” has risen from 42% in February to 53% currently.

Public Sees Better News about Jobs, But Not Prices     Wednesday, April 06, 2011
With the employment picture slowly improving in recent months, fewer Americans say they are hearing mostly bad news about the job situation. At the same time, perceptions of news about prices – especially gas prices – remain overwhelmingly negative. Currently, 43% say they are hearing mostly bad news about the job situation – down seven points from last month and the lowest percentage since June 2009, when the question was first asked. About as many (42%) say they are hearing a mix of good and bad news, while 12% say they are hearing mostly good news about jobs.

Obama Tests Well at Start of Reelection Run    Wednesday, March 23, 2011
Barack Obama currently fares as well against a generic opponent in the upcoming presidential election as George W. Bush did in April 2003, a time when Bush’s job approval rating was much higher than Obama’s is today. He also tests considerably better than Bill Clinton did in March 1995. According to a new survey, nearly half (47%) of registered voters say they would like to see Barack Obama reelected, while 37% say they would prefer to see a Republican candidate win the 2012 election. In April 2003, 48% of registered voters said they would like to see Bush reelected in 2004; 34% said they would prefer to see a Democrat win.

Opposition to Nuclear Power Rises Amid Japanese Crisis    Monday, March 21, 2011
Not surprisingly, public support for the increased use of nuclear power has declined amid the ongoing nuclear emergency in Japan. Currently, 39% say they favor promoting the increased use of nuclear power while 52% are opposed. Last October, 47% favored promoting the increased use of nuclear power and the same percentage (47%) was opposed. Opinion about expanding the use of nuclear power has fluctuated in recent years. However, the current measure matches a previous low in support for increased nuclear power recorded in September 2005 (39% favor, 53% oppose).

March Health Tracking    Friday, March 18, 2011
Little has changed since President Obama signed the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) into law. The March Health Tracking Poll finds that the public continues to report that they are confused about the law, say they don’t have enough information on how the law will affect them, and remain divided in their views of the law.

The Internet and Campaign 2010    Thursday, March 17, 2011
54% of adults used the internet for political purposes in the last cycle, far surpassing the 2006 midterm contest. They hold mixed views about the impact of the internet: It enables extremism, while helping the like-minded find each other. It provides diverse sources, but makes it harder to find truthful sources.

Republicans Are Losing Ground on the Deficit, But Obama's Not Gaining    Wednesday, March 16, 2011
As the budget debate moves into a crucial phase, far fewer Americans say that Republicans in Congress have the better approach to the budget deficit than did so in November, shortly after the GOP’s sweeping election victories. The GOP has lost ground on the deficit among political independents and, surprisingly, among key elements of the Republican base, including Tea Party supporters. However, the public is no more supportive of Barack Obama’s approach to the budget deficit than it was in November. Rather, there has been a sharp rise in the percentage saying there is not much difference between Obama’s approach and that of congressional Republicans – 52% say that now, up from just 33% in November.

How mobile devices are changing community information environments    Monday, March 14, 2011
Local news is going mobile. Nearly half of all American adults (47%) report that they get at least some local news and information on their cellphone or tablet computer. This survey is a part of the Project for Excellence in Journalism’s 2011 State of the News Media Report. These results come from a national phone survey of 2,251 American adults (age 18 or more) in English and Spanish.

Public Wary of Military Intervention in Libya    Monday, March 14, 2011
The public by a wide margin says the United States does not have a responsibility to do something about the fighting between government forces and anti-government groups in Libya. And while opinion is divided over enforcing a no-fly zone over Libya, this view is undercut by the fact that Americans overwhelmingly oppose bombing Libyan military air defenses.

Continuing Divide in Views of Islam and Violence    Wednesday, March 09, 2011
The public remains divided over whether Islam is more likely than other religions to encourage violence among its believers. Currently, 40% say the Islamic religion is more likely than others to encourage violence while 42% say it is not. These opinions have changed little in recent years. But in March 2002, just 25% saw Islam as more likely to encourage violence while twice as many (51%) disagreed.

Most See Role for Government in Reducing Childhood Obesity    Tuesday, March 08, 2011
Most Americans say the government should play a significant role in reducing obesity among children. But there is strong opposition to government involvement in this effort among conservative Republicans and Tea Party supporters. A new survey finds that 57% say the government should play a significant role in reducing obesity among children, while 39% say it should not. However, the public does not view the fight against obesity as a major policy priority for the president and Congress. In Pew Research’s annual policy priorities poll in January, just 19% rated dealing with obesity in this country as a top priority, the lowest among 22 items tested; nearly as many (14%) said it should not be done at all.

Fewer Are Angry at Government, But Discontent Remains High    Thursday, March 03, 2011
The public remains deeply frustrated with the federal government, but fewer Americans say they are angry at government than did so last fall. Overall, the percentage saying they are angry with the federal government has fallen from 23% last September to 14% today, with much of the decline coming among Republicans and Tea Party supporters. While anger at government has subsided, the public expresses no greater taste for political compromise today than it did last fall. As political leaders head into a tough political debate over the budget, 54% say they like elected officials who stick to their positions, while 40% prefer officials who make compromises with people they disagree with. This is virtually identical to the balance of opinion among registered voters last September.

More Side with Wisconsin Unions than Governor    Monday, February 28, 2011
By a modest margin, more say they back Wisconsin’s public employee unions rather than the state’s governor in their continuing dispute over collective bargaining rights. Roughly four-in-ten (42%) say they side more with the public employee unions, while 31% say they side more with the governor, Scott Walker. In Washington, meanwhile, prospects for an imminent government shutdown decreased as Republicans and Democrats neared a short-term budget deal

February Health Tracking    Thursday, February 24, 2011
In the wake of the health reform repeal vote in the U.S. House and the ongoing legal challenges over the individual mandate, nearly half the country either believes that the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) has been repealed and is no longer law (22 percent) or doesn’t know enough to say whether it is still law (26 percent). Roughly half of Americans (52 percent) accurately report that the ACA is still the law of the land. Meanwhile, views on repeal continue to be very mixed: with four in ten backing repeal (but half of those hoping the law will be replaced with a Republican alternative), three in ten backing an expansion of the law, and two in ten hoping to see it implemented as is. And most Americans continue to report they want to keep many of the key provisions of the law. There is more agreement when it comes to the strategy of using the legislative budgeting process to stop implementation of the law: six in ten continue to oppose the idea.

Public Favors Tougher Border Controls and Path to Citizenship    Thursday, February 24, 2011
The public continues to favor tough measures to crack down on illegal immigration. Yet Americans see no contradiction in supporting both stepped-up border security and a way for people already in the United States illegally to gain citizenship. The idea of changing the constitution to bar the children of illegal immigrants from becoming citizens also remains unpopular. Nearly six-in-ten (57%) oppose changing the constitution for this purpose, a figure that has changed little since 2006.

Labor Unions Seen as Good for Workers, Not U.S. Competitiveness    Thursday, February 17, 2011
The favorability ratings for labor unions remain at nearly their lowest level in a quarter century with 45% expressing a positive view. Yet the public expresses similar opinions about business corporations – 47% have a favorable impression – and this rating is also near a historic low. Americans express mixed views of the impact of labor unions on salaries and working conditions, international competitiveness, job availability and productivity. About half (53%) say unions have had a positive effect on the salaries and benefits of union workers, while just 17% say they have had a negative effect. Views are similar about the impact of unions on working conditions for all workers (51% positive, 17% negative).

Public Remains Divided Over the Patriot Act    Tuesday, February 15, 2011
Public views of the Patriot Act, whose renewal is being debated by Congress, have changed little since the Bush administration. Currently, 42% say the Patriot Act is a necessary tool that helps the government find terrorists, while somewhat fewer (34%) say the Patriot Act goes too far and poses a threat to civil liberties. In 2006, the public divided evenly over the Patriot Act, with 39% saying it is a necessary tool and 38% saying it goes too far. In 2004, a slight plurality (39%) said it goes too far and threatens civil liberties.

Fewer Want Spending to Grow, But Most Cuts Remain Unpopular    Thursday, February 10, 2011
The public’s views about federal spending are beginning to change. Across a range of federal programs, Americans are no longer calling for increased spending, as they have for many years. For the most part, however, there is not a great deal of support for cutting spending, though in a few cases support for reductions has grown noticeably. The survey also shows that the public is reluctant to cut spending – or raise taxes – to balance state budgets.

No Consensus on How Egypt Protests Will Affect U.S.    Tuesday, February 08, 2011
Americans do not have a clear point of view on how the massive anti-government protests in Egypt will affect the United States. More than half (58%) say the protests will not have much of an effect (36%), or offer no response or are noncommittal (22%). Of the minority that thinks the protests will have an effect on the U.S., nearly twice as many say their impact will be negative rather than positive (28% vs. 15%). This lack of agreement notwithstanding, a majority (57%) says the Obama administration is handling the situation in Egypt about right, while much smaller numbers say the administration has shown too much support (12%) or too little support (12%) for the protestors.

22% of online Americans used social networking or Twitter for politics in 2010 campaign    Thursday, January 27, 2011
After first gaining prominence as tools for political engagement during the 2008 presidential election, social media became a regular part of the political environment for voters in the 2010 midyear elections. Some 22% of online adults used Twitter or social networking sites such as Facebook or MySpace in the months leading up to the November, 2010 elections to connect to the campaign or the election itself.

Most Intend to Watch Obama's State of the Union    Monday, January 24, 2011
Most Americans say they plan to watch President Obama’s State of the Union address Tuesday night. Still, a sizable majority sees the speech to Congress as no more important than in previous years. Sixty-one percent say they plan to watch the State of the Union address, either on television (54%) or the internet (7%). About a third (35%) say they don’t think they will watch the State of the Union, Obama’s first since Republicans took control of the House in the 2010 elections. Nearly three-in-ten (28%) say this year’s speech is more important than addresses in past years, while 53% say it is about as important and 11% say it is less important.

Economy Dominates Public's Agenda, Dims Hopes for the Future    Thursday, January 20, 2011
The public’s policy agenda is again dominated by the economy and jobs with other major issues viewed as less important. Fully 87% say that strengthening the economy should be a top priority for the president and Congress and 84% rate improving the job situation as a top priority, by far the highest percentages among 22 issues tested. And with the economy continuing to struggle, optimism about the country’s long-term future has declined. Currently, 54% say they are optimistic about the long-term future of the United States, down from 61% last April. In 1999, 70% said they were optimistic about the country’s future.

No Shift Toward Gun Control After Tucson Shootings    Wednesday, January 19, 2011
In the wake of the Tucson shootings, there is no significant change in public views on the issue of gun control and gun rights. Currently, 49% of Americans say it is more important to protect the right of Americans to own guns, while 46% say it is more important to control gun ownership. In September 2010, 50% prioritized gun control, 46% gun rights. In this regard, there is no sign that the longer trend toward an emphasis on gun owners’ rights has abated.

The Social Side of the Internet    Tuesday, January 18, 2011
The internet is now deeply embedded in group and organizational life in America. A new national survey by the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project has found that 75% of all American adults are active in some kind of voluntary group or organization and internet users are more likely than others to be active: 80% of internet users participate in groups, compared with 56% of non-internet users. Moreover, social media users are even more likely to be active: 82% of social network users and 85% of Twitter users are group participants. The results are based on data from telephone interviews conducted by Princeton Survey Research Associates International from November 23 to December 21, 2010, among a sample of 2,303 adults, age 18 and older. Telephone interviews were conducted in English and Spanish by landline (1,555) and cell phone (748).

Obama's Job Ratings, Personal Image Unchanged by Recent Washington Events    Thursday, January 13, 2011
The president’s approval ratings have been rock steady since late August and his personal image has changed very little since the middle of last year. Currently, 46% say they approve of how Obama is handling his job while 44% disapprove. The public is similarly divided on other general measures of his job performance. One-in-four (25%) think that in the long run, Obama will be a successful president, while about the same number (26%) believes that he will be unsuccessful. And 47% think that Obama’s accomplishments will be good for the country in the long run, compared with 42% who do not.

Strengthen Ties with China, But Get Tough on Trade    Wednesday, January 12, 2011
Americans increasingly see Asia as the region of the world that is most important to the United States. Nearly half (47%) say Asia is most important, compared with just 37% who say Europe, home to many of America’s closest traditional allies. Views on this issue have changed considerably over the last decade. In an early September 2001 poll, 44% said our political, economic and military ties to Europe were more important, while 34% prioritized our ties to Asia.

Internet Gains on Television as Public's Main News Source    Tuesday, January 04, 2011
The internet is slowly closing in on television as Americans’ main source of national and international news. Currently, 41% say they get most of their news about national and international news from the internet, which is little changed over the past two years but up 17 points since 2007. Television remains the most widely used source for national and international news – 66% of Americans say it is their main source of news – but that is down from 74% three years ago and 82% as recently as 2002.

65% of internet users have paid for online content    Thursday, December 30, 2010
Nearly two-thirds of internet users – 65% – have paid to download or access some kind of online content from the internet, ranging from music to games to news articles to adult material. Music, software, and apps are the most popular content that internet users have paid to access or download, although the range of paid online content is quite varied and widespread. The survey data reported here are from telephone interviews with a nationally representative sample of 1,003 adults living in the continental United States. Interviews were done in English by Princeton Data Source from October 28-November 1, 2010.

Politics Goes Mobile    Thursday, December 23, 2010
In a post-election nationwide survey of adults, the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project found that more than a quarter of American adults – 26% – used their cell phones to learn about or participate in the 2010 mid-term election campaign. The results reported here come from a survey of 2,257 adults conducted November 3 through November 24, 2010. Among them, 1,918 are cell phone users.

Generations 2010    Thursday, December 16, 2010
There are still notable differences by generation in online activities, but the dominance of the Millennial generation that we documented in our first “Generations” report in 2009 has slipped in many activities. The primary adult data in this report is based on the findings of a daily tracking survey on Americans'''' use of the Internet. The results in this report are based on data from telephone interviews conducted by Princeton Survey Research Associates International between April 29 and May 30, 2010, among a sample of 2,252 adults ages 18 and older, including 744 reached on a cell phone. Interviews were conducted in English.

For Public, Tough Year Ends on a Down Note    Wednesday, December 15, 2010
Consistent with the mood of the nation all year, 2010 is closing on a down note. Fully 72% are dissatisfied with national conditions, 89% rate national economic conditions as only fair or poor, and majorities or pluralities think the country is losing ground on nine of 12 major issues. The public is especially bearish about the federal budget deficit, the cost of living, the financial condition of Social Security and the availability of good-paying jobs. At least six-in-ten say the country is losing ground in each of these areas. Smaller majorities say the nation is losing ground on the gap between rich and poor (58%), the ability to compete economically with other countries (55%) and the financial condition of Medicare (51%).

December Health Tracking Poll    Monday, December 13, 2010
As 2010 draws to a close, the latest tracking poll shows the public still divided in their views of the health reform law, a sentiment largely unchanged since the law’s enactment in March. Forty-two percent of Americans say they have a generally favorable view of the law, while 41 percent have a generally unfavorable view of it. Seniors, generally more critical of the law than younger people, seem to be softening in their opposition as the national discussion shifts to the federal budget and deficit. The share of those aged 65 and up holding unfavorable views of health reform dropped to 40 percent in December, the lowest since the passage of the law.

Tax Cuts Win Broad Bipartisan Support    Monday, December 13, 2010
The agreement between President Obama and congressional Republicans to extend tax cuts and unemployment benefits is getting strong bipartisan support. Overall, 60% approve of the agreement while just 22% disapprove. Nearly half (48%) say the agreement will help the economy, while just 29% think it will hurt the economy. Opinions are similar about the personal impact of the deal: Nearly twice as many say the agreement will help (47%) rather than hurt (25%) people like themselves.

8% of online Americans use Twitter    Thursday, December 09, 2010
This is the first-ever survey reading from the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project that exclusively examines Twitter users. In previous surveys, the Project had asked internet users whether they “used Twitter or another service to share updates about yourself or to see updates about others?” Eight percent of the American adults who use the internet are Twitter users. This report contains data from several different sources. The data on overall Twitter usage and demographics comes from the Pew Internet Project’s November 2010 tracking survey, while the data on frequency of use and types of material posted by Twitter users comes from two Omnibus Surveys conducted in October 2010.

Deficit Solutions Meet With Public Skepticism    Thursday, December 09, 2010
In many respects, there is a broad public consensus when it comes to the federal budget deficit: seven-in-ten say it is a major problem that must be addressed right away, and roughly two-thirds say that the best way to reduce the deficit is through a combination of cutting major government programs and increasing taxes. Yet this general consensus evaporates when concrete deficit reduction proposals are tested.

Most Say WikiLeaks Release Harms Public Interest    Wednesday, December 08, 2010
Most Americans following news about the WikiLeaks website’s release of a huge trove of classified documents about U.S. diplomatic relations see the revelations – which have received extensive media coverage – doing more harm than good. Six-in-ten (60%) of those paying attention to the story say they believe the release of thousands of secret State Department communications harms the public interest. About half that number (31%) say the release serves the public interest.

Mixed Views on Tax Cuts, Support for START and Allowing Gays to Serve Openly    Tuesday, December 07, 2010
With the public giving subpar approval ratings to President Obama and continuing to express negative views of Congress and the political parties, it goes its own way on many of the remaining issues before the lame-duck Congress. In a survey conducted before Obama and GOP leaders agreed to temporarily extend all Bush-era tax cuts, most Americans (80%) favor preserving at least some of the tax cuts. However, just a third (33%) of Americans say they favor keeping all of the expiring tax cuts; 47% favor keeping just the tax cuts for income below $250,000, while just 11% want to end all of the tax cuts.

Despite Years of Terror Scares, Public's Concerns Remain Fairly Steady    Thursday, December 02, 2010
Since 9/11, in the United States there have been Orange Alerts and numerous near misses involving bombs smuggled aboard aircraft and in parked cars. But over the course of all of this, there is little evidence that close calls in this country or terrorist attacks overseas have led to a fundamental change in the public’s worries about terrorism. A recent survey finds that 59% say they are very (21%) or somewhat (38%) worried there will soon be another terrorist attack in the United States. This is little changed from July 2007 (20% very, 42% somewhat worried).

Most Continue to Favor Gays Serving Openly in Military    Monday, November 29, 2010
As the Pentagon prepares to release its highly anticipated survey of military personnel about the “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” policy, most Americans (58%) say they favor allowing homosexuals to serve openly in the armed forces. Fewer than half that number (27%) oppose allowing gays and lesbians to serve openly. These opinions have changed little in recent years. Since 2005 – including three surveys this year – roughly 60% have consistently favored permitting homosexuals to serve openly in the military.

Use of the internet in higher-income households    Wednesday, November 24, 2010
Those in higher-income households are different from other Americans in their tech ownership and use. Analysis of several recent surveys conducted by the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Projects find that there are key differences between those who live in households making $75,000 or more relative to those in lower-income households.

The Growing Gap between Landline and Dual Frame Election Polls    Monday, November 22, 2010
The number of Americans who rely solely or mostly on a cell phone has been growing for several years, posing an increasing likelihood that public opinion polls conducted only by landline telephone will be biased. A new analysis of Pew Research Center pre-election surveys conducted this year finds that support for Republican candidates was significantly higher in samples based only on landlines than in dual frame samples that combined landline and cell phone interviews. The difference in the margin among likely voters this year is about twice as large as in 2008.

Public Knows Basic Facts about Politics, Economics, Struggles with Specifics    Thursday, November 18, 2010
Americans see the big picture when it comes to the changing balance of power in Washington, but is not sure which party controls which house of Congress or who the next speaker will be. Many have a good idea about the growth of the federal deficit, but the public struggles with questions about specifics of the budget, TARP and inflation.

The Decline of Marriage and Rise of New Families    Thursday, November 18, 2010
Americans today are less likely to be married than at any time in the nation’s history. Rates have declined for all groups, but they have fallen most sharply among the less-advantaged, who are more likely than others to say that economic security is an important reason to marry. Even as marriage shrinks, family remains the most important and most satisfying element in the lives of most Americans.

Mixed Reactions to Republican Midterm Win    Thursday, November 11, 2010
The public, voters and non-voters alike, has a subdued reaction to the Republican Party’s midterm election victory. Four years ago, the response to the Democrats regaining full control of Congress was far more positive, as it was in 1994 when the GOP won a historic victory. Fewer people today say they are happy about the Republican victory, approve of the GOP’s plans for the future, and far fewer believe Republicans will be successful in getting their programs passed into law.

November Health Tracking Poll    Tuesday, November 09, 2010
The November 2010 tracking poll was conducted in the days following the mid-term election that resulted in major gains for Republicans, including a shift in control of the House of Representatives. The survey attempts to gauge what role health reform played in voters’ decisions, and to measure the current public mood about the health reform law.

Public Support for Increased Trade, Except With South Korea and China    Tuesday, November 09, 2010
The public is of two minds when it comes to trade with other countries. Most Americans say that increased trade with Canada, Japan and European Union countries – as well as India, Brazil and Mexico – would be good for the United States. But reactions are mixed to increased trade with South Korea and China.

Location-based services    Thursday, November 04, 2010
In its first report on the use of “geosocial” or location-based services, the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life project finds that 4% of online adults use a service such as Foursquare or Gowalla that allows them to share their location with friends and to find others who are nearby. On any given day, 1% of internet users are using these services. This report is based on the results of a telephone survey by the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project conducted between August 9 and September 13, 2010. The survey was administered to a sample of 3,001 adults, age 18 and older, using a combination of landline and cellular telephones. Interviews were conducted in English or Spanish.

Little Change in Opinions about Global Warming    Wednesday, October 27, 2010
Views about the existence and causes of global warming have changed little over the past year. A new poll finds that 59% of adults say there is solid evidence that the earth’s average temperature has been getting warmer over the past few decades. In October 2009, 57% said this. Roughly a third (34%) say that global warming is occurring mostly because of human activity, such as the burning of fossil fuels, which also is little changed from last year (36%).

Midterm Snapshot: Enthusiasm for Obama Reelection Bid Greater Than for Reagan in 1982    Monday, October 25, 2010
Two years ahead of the next presidential election, the public is divided over whether Barack Obama should run for a second term as president. About half (47%) say they would like to see Obama run again in 2012, while 42% say they would not. This is better than the outlook for Ronald Reagan in August 1982, when just 36% said they wanted to see him run for reelection.

Newsweek Poll: Congressional Elections / Marijuana    Friday, October 22, 2010
According to the latest NEWSWEEK poll, the race for Congress remains close. Among likely voters, Democratic candidates are preferred over Republican candidates by a statistically insignificant margin of 48% to 45%. While the GOP is running much stronger in this midterm election than the last one (2006), these results cast doubt on whether the predictions of a Republican wave will come true. At a time that California voters will vote on a ballot initiative that would legalize recreational use of marijuana, the NEWSWEEK poll finds a majority of U.S. adults saying they would not support such a measure if it were put to a vote in their state (52%) or at the national level (52%).

Ground War More Intense Than 2006, Early Voting More Prevalent    Thursday, October 21, 2010
As the 2010 midterm elections near, Republican engagement and enthusiasm continue at record levels, outpacing even improved Democratic showings on these indicators. The growing popularity of early voting -- about a quarter of voters nationally say they plan to vote before Election Day -- gives Democrats less time to make up ground and there is no indication that their voter mobilization efforts are outmatching Republican efforts.

Mobile Health 2010    Tuesday, October 19, 2010
The online health-information environment is going mobile. 17% of cell phone users have used their phone to look up health or medical information and 9% have software applications or "apps" on their phones that help them track or manage their health. The results in this report are based on data from telephone interviews conducted by Princeton Survey Research Associates International between August 9 and September 13, 2010, among a sample of 3,001 adults, age 18 and older. Interviews were conducted in English and Spanish and included 1,000 cell phone interviews.

October Health Tracking Poll    Monday, October 18, 2010
With the November midterm elections just weeks away, Americans remain chronically divided over the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, but most say that their feelings – pro and con – about the health reform law are not a dominant factor in how they will vote for Congress or whether they will go to the polls.

Americans and their gadgets    Thursday, October 14, 2010
In recent years the digital world has expanded far beyond the desktop, and consumers can now choose from an array of devices capable of satisfying their need for “anytime, anywhere” access to news, information, friends and entertainment. This report is based on the findings of a daily tracking survey on Americans'''' use of the Internet. The results in this report are based on data from telephone interviews conducted by Princeton Survey Research Associates International between August 9 and September 13, 2010, among a sample of 3,001 adults, age 18 and older. Interviews were conducted in English and Spanish.

Newsweek Poll: Psychology of Voter Anger    Friday, October 01, 2010
At a time of widespread dissatisfaction with the direction of the country, a NEWSWEEK poll finds nearly one-quarter (23%) of the electorate describing themselves as “angry voters” based on their overall attitude toward the federal government. While this anti-government group overlaps with supporters of the Tea Party movement, they are not one and the same. Just over half (52%) of angry voters identify as Republicans, but close to a third (29%) prefer to call themselves Independents. Less than half (42%) of angry voters declare themselves to be Tea Party supporters, and one-third (34%) either oppose the Tea Party or have mixed opinions of it.

Online Product Research    Wednesday, September 29, 2010
The commercial use of the internet by American adults has grown since the mid-2000s, with 58% of Americans now reporting that they perform online research concerning the products and services that they are considering purchasing. That is an increase from 49% who said they conducted product or service research online in 2004. The re­sults are based on data from telephone interviews conducted by Princeton Survey Research Associates International between August 9 and September 13, 2010, among a sample of 3,001 adults, age 18 and older. Interviews were conducted in English and Spanish.

Minnesota Poll: Dayton still has edge on Emmer    Monday, September 27, 2010
Five weeks before Minnesotans elect a new governor, DFL candidate Mark Dayton leads GOP rival Tom Emmer among likely voters, with Independence Party candidate Tom Horner gaining ground, a Star Tribune Minnesota Poll has found.  This survey was conducted September 20-23 by PSRAI for the Minneapolis Star Tribune among 949 likely voters.

Obama Viewed as Doing Better than GOP Leaders in Explaining Vision    Monday, September 27, 2010
With just over a month to go before the midterm elections, the public by a wide margin says Barack Obama has done a better job than Republican congressional leaders in explaining his plans and vision for the country. Half (50%) of the public says Obama has done a better job, compared with just 28% who say GOP leaders have done better in laying out their plans and vision. The poll also finds that the public remains highly critical of Congress, though they judge their own lawmaker’s performance less harshly. Obama’s job performance ratings remain better than those for Congress, but are little changed since June.

September Health Tracking Poll    Monday, September 27, 2010
Six months since the enactment of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and a month and a half before the midterm congressional elections, a new poll finds the public remains divided on the new law. Public confusion over the new health law has risen to its highest point since April.

Independents Oppose Party in Power ... Again    Thursday, September 23, 2010
For the third national election in a row, independent voters may be poised to vote out the party in power. The Republican Party holds a significant edge in preferences for the upcoming congressional election among likely voters, in large part because political independents now favor Republican candidates by about as large a margin as they backed Barack Obama in 2008 and congressional Democratic candidates four years ago.

Many Say Ending Tax Cuts for Wealthy Would Hurt Economy    Monday, September 20, 2010
Nearly four-in-ten Americans (39%) say that allowing Bush-era tax cuts for the wealthy to expire at the end of this year would hurt the economy, while about a quarter each say this would help the economy (26%) or have no effect (26%).

Few Say Religion Shapes Immigration, Environment Views    Friday, September 17, 2010
Many Americans continue to say their religious beliefs have been highly influential in shaping their views about social issues, including abortion and same-sex marriage. But far fewer cite religion as a top influence on their opinions about several other social and political issues, including how the government should deal with immigration, the environment and poverty.

The Rise of Apps Culture    Tuesday, September 14, 2010
Some 35% of U.S. adults have software applications or “apps” on their phones, yet only 24% of adults use those apps. Many adults who have apps on their phones, particularly older adults, do not use them, and 11% of cell owners are not sure if their phone is equipped with apps. The re­sults are based on data from telephone interviews conducted by Princeton Survey Research Associates International between April 29 and May 30, 2010, among a sample of 2,252 adults, age 18 and older. Interviews were conducted in English.

Americans Spending More Time Following the News    Sunday, September 12, 2010
There are many more ways to get the news these days, and as a consequence Americans are spending more time with the news than over much of the past decade. Digital platforms are playing a larger role in news consumption, and they seem to be more than making up for modest declines in the audience for traditional platforms. As a result, the average time Americans spend with the news on a given day is as high as it was in the mid-1990s, when audiences for traditional news sources were much larger.

Cell phones and American adults    Thursday, September 02, 2010
Texting by American adults has increased substantially over the past year, but still does not approach the magnitude of text messages exchanged by adolescents. Some 72% of adult cell phone users send and receive text messages now, up from 65% in September 2009. Fully 87% of teen cell users text. Teens text 50 messages a day on average, five times more than the typical 10 text messages sent and received by adults per day. The re­sults are based on data from telephone interviews conducted by Princeton Survey Research Associates International between April 29 and May 30, 2010, among a sample of 2,252 adults, age 18 and older. Interviews were conducted in English.

August Health Tracking Poll    Monday, August 30, 2010
Support for health reform fell over the course of August, dipping from a 50 percent favorability rating in July to 43 percent, while 45 percent of the public reported unfavorable views. The dip in favorability returned public opinion on the new law to the even split last seen in May before a modest uptick in support in June and July.

Newsweek Poll: Obama and Muslims    Friday, August 27, 2010
With the midterm Congressional elections now less than two and one-half months away, a NEWSWEEK POLL shows Barack Obama’s approval rating remaining below the 50 percent mark. In the new poll, 47% of Americans say they approve of the job he is doing overall while 45% say they disapprove. In the midst of the controversy about the construction of a mosque and cultural center within a few blocks of the former WTC site in New York City, this most recent NEWSWEEK poll shows American opinion toward Muslim Americans is about as positive as it has ever been. Anti-Muslim attitudes seem to be concentrated among certain segments of the public and not widely held. In fact, nearly three-quarters (72%) of the public say it would be okay with them for a group of Muslim Americans to build a mosque in their local community.

Public Remains Conflicted Over Islam    Tuesday, August 24, 2010
The public continues to express conflicted views of Islam. Favorable opinions of Islam have declined since 2005, but there has been virtually no change over the past year in the proportion of Americans saying that Islam is more likely than other religions to encourage violence. As was the case a year ago, slightly more people say the Islamic religion does not encourage violence more than other religions (42%) than say that it does (35%).

Growing Number Say Obama is a Muslim    Thursday, August 19, 2010
A substantial and growing number of Americans say that Barack Obama is a Muslim, while the proportion saying he is a Christian has declined. More than a year and a half into his presidency, a plurality of the public says they do not know what religion Obama follows.

Home Broadband 2010    Thursday, August 12, 2010
After several consecutive years of modest but consistent growth, broadband adoption slowed dramatically in 2010. Two-thirds of American adults (66%) currently use a high-speed internet connection at home, a figure that is not statistically different from what The Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project found at a similar point in 2009, when 63% of Americans were broadband adopters. The results in this report are based on data from telephone interviews conducted by Princeton Survey Research Associates International between April 29 and May 30, 2010, among a sample of 2,252 adults ages 18 and older, including 744 reached on a cell phone. Interviews were conducted in English.

Republicans Faring Better with Men, Whites, Independents and Seniors    Tuesday, August 10, 2010
The Republican Party’s prospects for the midterm elections look much better than they did four years ago at this time, while the Democrats’ look much worse. Voter preferences for the upcoming congressional elections remain closely divided (45% support the Democratic candidate or lean Democratic, while 44% favor the Republican or lean Republican). In polling conducted in August-September 2006, the Democrats held an 11-point advantage (50% to 39%).

Earmarks Could Help Candidates in Midterms    Monday, August 02, 2010
In the congressional elections this fall, candidates with a record of bringing government projects and money to their districts may have an edge. A majority of Americans (53%) say they are more likely to vote for a candidate with a record of delivering earmarks for their districts; just 12% say they would be less likely to vote for such a candidate. A third of the public (33%) says this would make no difference in their vote either way.

Minnesota Poll: Democrats hold lead over Emmer    Monday, August 02, 2010
In the race to become the next governor of Minnesota, DFL candidates Mark Dayton and Margaret Anderson Kelliher each appear to hold significant leads over Republican challenger Tom Emmer, a Star Tribune Minnesota Poll has found. A third DFLer, Matt Entenza, has a statistically insignificant lead over Emmer in the poll. This report is based on findings from a survey conducted July 26-29, 2010 by PSRAI for the Star Tribune among 902 Minnesota adults.

Health Tracking — July 2010    Friday, July 30, 2010
Overall public support for the health reform law is steady from June, while unfavorable views of the law have trended downward. Half the public (50%) now expresses a favorable view of the law, while 35 percent say they have an unfavorable opinion (down from 41% in June).



Obama's Policies Seen as Better than Bush's for Improving the Economy    Monday, July 26, 2010
While most Americans disapprove of Barack Obama’s handling of the economy, far more think his administration’s policies – rather than those of the Bush administration – would do more to improve economic conditions over the next few years. As Congress gears up for debate over the tax cuts passed when Bush was president, the public is divided, with roughly equal numbers in favor of keeping all of Bush’s tax cuts, repealing only those for wealthy Americans, or scrapping them entirely.

The Impact of Long-term Unemployment    Thursday, July 22, 2010
Long-term unemployment takes a much deeper toll than short-term unemployment on a person''''s finances, emotional well-being and career prospects, according to a new Pew Research Center survey that explores the attitudes and experiences of workers who have lost jobs during the Great Recession. Of those who have experienced an unemployment spell of at least six months, more than four-in-ten (44%) report that the recession has caused "major changes" in their lives. By comparison, fewer than a third (31%) of those who had been unemployed less than six months and 20% of adults who were not unemployed during the recession say they were similarly affected.

Newsweek Poll: How Much Is Beauty Worth at Work? (Business)    Monday, July 19, 2010
We’ve all heard the stories about how pretty people have it easy: babies smile more around good-looking parents; handsome kids get better grades and jobs, and earn more money; the list goes on. Still, we’d probably all like to think that we’ve earned our jobs on merit alone—and that, in this economy, it’s our skill that will get us back in the game. But if you believe the results of two new NEWSWEEK Polls, you’d better think again. NEWSWEEK conducted an online survey of 202 corporate hiring managers, from human-resource employees to senior-level VPs, as well as a telephone survey of a nationally representative sample of 964 members of the public, only to confirm what no qualified (or unqualified) employee wants to admit: that in all elements of the workplace, from hiring to politics to promotions, even, looks matter, and they matter hard.

Gov't Economic Policies Seen as Boon for Banks and Big Business, Not Middle Class or Poor    Monday, July 19, 2010
The public sees clear winners and losers from the economic policies the government has implemented since the recession of 2008. Most Americans say these policies have helped large banks, large corporations and the wealthy, while providing little or no help for the poor, the middle class or small businesses.

Newsweek Poll: How Much Is Beauty Worth at Work? (National)    Monday, July 19, 2010
We’ve all heard the stories about how pretty people have it easy: babies smile more around good-looking parents; handsome kids get better grades and jobs, and earn more money; the list goes on. Still, we’d probably all like to think that we’ve earned our jobs on merit alone—and that, in this economy, it’s our skill that will get us back in the game. But if you believe the results of two new NEWSWEEK Polls, you’d better think again. NEWSWEEK conducted an online survey of 202 corporate hiring managers, from human-resource employees to senior-level VPs, as well as a telephone survey of a nationally representative sample of 964 members of the public, only to confirm what no qualified (or unqualified) employee wants to admit: that in all elements of the workplace, from hiring to politics to promotions, even, looks matter, and they matter hard.

Political Knowledge Update    Thursday, July 15, 2010
An overwhelming proportion of Americans are familiar with Twitter, the online information-sharing network. Perhaps more surprisingly, a large majority also knows that children who are born to illegal immigrants in the United States are automatically U.S. citizens. Yet the public continues to struggle in identifying political figures, foreign leaders and even knowing facts about key government policies.

Public's Wish List for Congress - Jobs and Deficit Reduction    Monday, July 12, 2010
The public overwhelmingly views the job situation as a major priority for Congress during the coming months. Fully 80% say it is very important for Congress to pass legislation to address the job situation, which is virtually unchanged from May (81%).

Republicans Less Positive Toward Supreme Court    Friday, July 09, 2010
Republicans’ opinions of the Supreme Court have become less favorable during the Obama administration. As a result, more Democrats than Republicans now express a positive opinion of the Supreme Court – the first time this has occurred since the Clinton administration.

Mobile Access 2010    Wednesday, July 07, 2010
Cell phone and wireless laptop internet use have each grown more prevalent over the last year. Nearly half of all adults (47%) go online with a laptop using a Wi-Fi connection or mobile broadband card (up from the 39% who did so as of April 2009) while 40% of adults use the internet, email or instant messaging on a mobile phone (up from the 32% of Americans who did this in 2009). This means that 59% of adults now access the internet wirelessly using a laptop or cell phone—that is, they answered “yes” to at least one of these wireless access pathways. That adds up to an increase from the 51% who used a laptop or cell phone wirelessly in April 2009. This report is based on the findings of a daily tracking survey on Americans’ use of the Internet. The results in this report are based on data from telephone interviews conducted by PSRAI for the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project between April 29 and May 30, 2010, among a sample of 2,252 adults, age 18 and older. Interviews were conducted in English. To view more from this survey, click here.

The future of social relations    Friday, July 02, 2010
The social benefits of internet use will far outweigh the negatives over the next decade, according to experts who responded to a survey about the future of the internet. They say this is because email, social networks, and other online tools offer ‘low-friction’ opportunities to create, enhance, and rediscover social ties that make a difference in people’s lives. The internet lowers traditional communications constraints of cost, geography, and time; and it supports the type of open information sharing that brings people together. This survey was conducted December 2, 2009 – January 11, 2010 by PSRAI for the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project and the Imagining the Internet Center at Elon University among 895 internet experts and other internet users. To view more from this survey, click here.

Health Tracking — June 2010    Wednesday, June 30, 2010
The start of summer finds Americans remain divided on the health reform law, but favorable views of the new law increased seven percentage points over the past month to 48 percent, compared to 41 percent who have “generally unfavorable” views and 10 percent who have yet to make up their minds. 

 With four months remaining until the midterm congressional elections, an early look suggests that the contests could be impacted by a number of different issues, with the economy in the lead but health care also in the mix. 


Afghanistan War Hurting Obama's Support at Home    Tuesday, June 29, 2010
The troubled war in Afghanistan is a growing political problem for President Barack Obama. According to a new NEWSWEEK Poll, the lasting impact of his decision to fire Gen. Stanley McChrystal for mouthing off about his civilian bosses in a recent Rolling Stone article—a move most Americans support—has been to raise doubts about the war and undermine confidence in the commander in chief.  This survey was conducted June 23-24, 2010 by PSRAI for Newsweek among 964 adults.

Public Rejects Variety Of Options For Fixing State Budgets    Monday, June 28, 2010
Most Americans see the deteriorating budget situations in many states as a problem that the states themselves – rather than the federal government – should solve. But when it comes to specific proposals to balance state budgets, there is more opposition than support for each option asked about – particularly cuts in funding for education and public safety programs.

Public Sees a Future Full of Promise and Peril    Tuesday, June 22, 2010
Imagine a future in which cancer becomes a memory, ordinary people travel in space, and computers carry on conversations like humans. Now imagine a darker future – a world beset by war, rising temperatures and energy shortages, one where the United States faces a terrorist attack with nuclear weapons. Most Americans think that these developments and many others are likely to unfold over the next 40 years.

Public Uncertain About How to Improve Job Situation    Monday, June 21, 2010
A new poll reveals there is very little agreement about what the government should do now to deal with the nation’s biggest economic concern – the job situation. None of the options currently under discussion for dealing with the job situation are viewed as very helpful. In fact, fewer than four-in-ten say each of these proposals would help the job situation a lot: additional spending on public works (37%); cutting taxes for businesses (36%) or individuals (31%); budget cuts to reduce the deficit (34%); or providing money to state and local governments to help them avoid layoffs (33%).

Adults and Cell Phone Distractions    Friday, June 18, 2010
Adults are just as likely as teens to have texted while driving and are substantially more likely to have talked on the phone while driving. According to a new survey, one in four (27%) of American adults say they have texted while driving, the same proportion as the number of driving age teens (26%) who say they have texted while driving. Fully 61% of adults say they have talked on their cell phones while behind the wheel, considerably greater than the number of 16- and 17-year olds (43%) who have talked on their cells while driving. This survey was conducted between April 29 and May 30, 2010 by PSRAI for the Pew Internet & American Life Project among 2,252 adults.

Public Remains of Two Minds on Energy Policy    Monday, June 14, 2010
With the oil leak in the Gulf of Mexico now nearly two months old, the public is sending mixed signals about U.S. energy policy. Despite the growing damage from the Gulf oil leak, the public generally favors continuing to drill for oil and gas in U.S. waters. And in setting priorities for energy legislation in Congress, fully 68% favor expanding exploration and development of coal, oil and gas in the United States.

Doubts About Obama's Economic Policies Rise    Monday, June 07, 2010
According to a new survey, the public increasingly sees Barack Obama’s policies as having an impact on economic conditions and, for the first time, slightly more say the impact has been negative rather than positive. About three-in-ten (29%) say Obama’s economic policies since taking office have made economic conditions worse; 23% say his policies have made conditions better. Nearly four-in-ten (38%) say they have had no effect so far or volunteer that it is too soon to tell.

Willingness to Compromise a Plus in Midterms    Monday, May 24, 2010
The public offers more positive than negative reactions to a candidate who is willing to make compromises. A substantial minority (42%) say they would be more likely to vote for a candidate who will make compromises with people they disagree with; only about half as many (22%) say they would be less likely to back a candidate willing to compromise, while 29% say it will make no difference. But there is a wide partisan divide. More than twice as many Republicans (40%) as Democrats (19%) or independents (15%) say they would be less willing to favor a candidate willing to compromise.

Health Tracking — May 2010    Friday, May 21, 2010
Confusion over the new health reform law declined but remains widespread, with 44 percent of the public saying they were confused in May, compared to 55 percent in April. Moreover, more than a third of Americans (35%) say they do not understand what the impact of the law will be on themselves and their families, while 61 percent report feeling they do understand what that impact will be.

Public's Priorities for Congress    Tuesday, May 18, 2010
The public views tougher regulations on financial institutions as an important priority for Congress, but far more want Congress to take action on the job situation and energy policy. In thinking about financial regulation, as many say they worry that the government will go too far in regulating financial markets, making it harder for the economy to grow, as say they worry that the government will not go far enough, leaving the country at risk of another financial crisis.

Broad Approval For New Arizona Immigration Law    Wednesday, May 12, 2010
The public broadly supports a new Arizona law aimed at dealing with illegal immigration and the law’s provisions giving police increased powers to stop and detain people who are suspected of being in the country illegally.

Oil Spill Seen As Ecological Disaster    Tuesday, May 11, 2010
A majority of Americans see the massive oil leak in the Gulf of Mexico as a major environmental disaster, but nearly as many voice optimism that efforts to control the spill will succeed.

Pessimistic Public Doubts Effectiveness of Stimulus    Wednesday, April 28, 2010
The public remains doggedly downbeat about the condition of the national economy, even as many experts and economists see signs of recovery. As has been the case for most of the past two years, about nine-in-ten (88%) rate national economic conditions as only fair or poor, and over the past year there has been no decline in the percentage saying the economy will stay the same (36%) or get worse (19%) a year from now.

Health Tracking - April 2010    Thursday, April 22, 2010
A new poll fielded shortly after the passage of health reform finds that 8 in 10 Americans know that President Obama signed the legislation into law. But 55 percent say they are confused about the law and more than half (56%) say they don’t yet have enough information to understand how it will affect them personally.

Distrust, Discontent and the Government    Monday, April 19, 2010
By almost every conceivable measure Americans are less positive and more critical of government these days. A new Pew Research Center survey finds a perfect storm of conditions associated with distrust of government – a dismal economy, an unhappy public, bitter partisan-based backlash, and epic discontent with Congress and elected officials.

Broadband Consumer Survey    Friday, March 19, 2010
According to the Federal Communications Commission’s October-November 2009 survey, nearly two-thirds (65 percent) of American adults use high-speed Internet connections to go online from home.  This survey was conducted October 19 to November 23, 2009 by PSRAI for the Federal Communications Commission among 5,005 adults.

Health Tracking - March 2010    Friday, March 19, 2010
Americans are still divided on health reform legislation, with 46 percent backing the reform proposals on Capitol Hill, 42 percent opposing them and 12 percent saying they aren''''t sure. Six in 10 Americans say they have heard little or nothing about budget reconciliation. And many people continue to struggle with health costs, with nearly one in five saying cost increases have caused them or their employer to switch to a less comprehensive health plan.

Americans Split on Health Care Reform Legislation    Tuesday, February 23, 2010
A new poll finds Americans are evenly split on health care reform legislation: 43 percent in favor and 43 percent opposed. However, the poll also finds that majorities of Republicans, Democrats and independents support several provisions in the health reform proposals in Congress and most attribute delays in passing the legislation to political gamesmanship rather than policy disagreements.

Newsweek Poll: Obama and Health Care    Friday, February 19, 2010
Health care reform has lost a lot of momentum since the House and Senate passed their versions of reform legislation, and most recent polling has shown public support waning. The latest Newsweek poll, however, suggests that there is greater public support for some sort of House/Senate compromise bill than polls that do not scratch below the surface might indicate. The level of public support for the kind of plan supported by Barack Obama varies based on how much people know about it. After hearing its key features described many people initially inclined to view it negatively move into the favorable column.

Midterm Election Challenges for Both Parties    Friday, February 12, 2010
According to a new survey, nine months ahead of the midterm elections, voters have conflicted attitudes about both political parties. Opinions of the Republican Party have improved significantly, and for the first time in years the GOP’s favorable ratings nearly equal the Democratic Party’s. Voting intentions for the fall elections also remain closely divided. However, the Democratic Party is still better regarded in many respects than is the GOP and far more people continue to blame the Republicans than the Democrats for the current state of the economy. And despite frustrations with his stewardship of the economy, bottom-line opinions of Barack Obama have not changed in the past few months.  This survey was conducted Feb. 3-9, 2010 by PSRAI for the Pew Research Center among 1,383 adults.

Americans Become More Supportive of Health Reform When Told About Key Provisions    Friday, January 22, 2010
A new poll, conducted before the Massachusetts Senate vote, finds opinion is divided when it comes to the hotly debated legislation, with 42 percent supporting the proposals in the Congress, 41 percent opposing them and 16 percent withholding judgment. However, majorities reported feeling more favorable toward the proposed legislation after learning about many of the key elements, with the notable exceptions of the individual mandate and the overall price tag. Click the above link to get more details.

Haiti Dominates Public's Consciousness    Wednesday, January 20, 2010
Fully 70% say it is the story they are talking about with friends. Overall interest in news about the earthquake in Haiti is on par with interest in the tsunami that struck the Indian Ocean in December 2004. Fully 60% say they followed news about the earthquake very closely; about the same percentage (58%) said they followed news about the tsunami in the Indian Ocean very closely in January 2005. Somewhat more people paid very close attention to Hurricane Katrina in 2005 (70%). Click the link above to get more details.

Blacks Upbeat about Black Progress, Prospects    Thursday, January 14, 2010
Despite the bad economy, blacks'''' assessments about the state of black progress in America have improved more dramatically during the past two years than at any time in the past quarter century, according to a comprehensive new nationwide Pew Research Center survey on race.  Barack Obama''''s election as the nation''''s first black president appears to be the spur for this sharp rise in optimism among African Americans. It may also be reflected in an upbeat set of black views on a range of other matters, including race relations, local community satisfaction and expectations for future black progress.  This survey was conducted Oct. 28 to Nov. 30, 2009 by PSRAI for the Pew Research Center among 2,884 adults, including 812 blacks.

Current Decade Rates as Worst in 50 Years    Monday, December 21, 2009
According to a new survey, as the current decade draws to a close, relatively few Americans have positive things to say about it. By roughly two-to-one, more say they have a generally negative (50%) rather than a generally positive (27%) impression of the past 10 years. This stands in stark contrast to the public’s recollection of other decades in the past half-century. When asked to look back on the 1960s, 1970s, 1980s and 1990s, positive feelings outweigh negative in all cases.  This survey was conducted December 9-13, 2009 by PSRAI for the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press among 1,504 adults.

Kaiser Health Tracking Poll - December 2009    Friday, December 18, 2009
A new survey finds a dip on several measures of public opinion on health care reform. The number of Americans who say they personally will be better off if reform passes fell to 35 percent in December, down from 42 percent last month. Meanwhile, 27 percent say they will be worse off, and 32 percent said they don’t expect to see much of a difference. Similarly, 45 percent say the country would be better off if health care reform passes down from 54 percent in November. This compares to 31 percent who say the country will be worse off and 17 percent who see no impact.

Mixed Views of Obama at Year's End    Wednesday, December 16, 2009
According to a new survey, public opinion about President Barack Obama and his major polices continues to be divided as the year comes to a close. His overall approval rating is 49%, which is largely unchanged from November (51%). However, the percentage expressing at least a fair amount of confidence in Obama to do the right thing when it comes to fixing the economy has slipped from 59% in October to 52% currently. Smaller percentages express confidence in Obama on health care reform (44%) and reducing the budget deficit (41%).  This survey was conducted Dec. 9-13 by PSRAI for the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press among 1,504 adults.

 



Teens and Sexting    Tuesday, December 15, 2009
According to a new survey, as texting has become a centerpiece in teen social life, parents, educators and advocates have grown increasingly concerned about the role of cell phones in the sexual lives of teens and young adults. The Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project found that 4% of cell-owning teens ages 12-17 say they have sent sexually suggestive nude or nearly nude images or videos of themselves to someone else via text messaging, a practice also known as “sexting”; 15% say they have received such images of someone they know via text message.  This survey was conducted June 26 and September 24, 2009 by PSRAI for the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project among 800 teens ages 12-17 and a parent or guardian

America's Place in the World    Thursday, December 03, 2009
As President Obama seeks to expand America’s global role on issues ranging from Afghanistan to climate change, the U.S. public is turning decidedly inward. For the first time in more than 40 years of polling, a plurality (49%) says the United States should “mind its own business internationally” and let other countries get along the best they can on their own.

Kaiser November Tracking Poll    Tuesday, November 24, 2009
A new poll shows little movement in measures of public opinion about health reform from recent months. Among the new findings is a ranking of the public''''s top priorities from among a list of elements of the legislation. There were both similarities and differences in priorities across partisan groups: while assuring the availability of affordable plans ranked in the top three priorities for Democrats, Republicans and independents, deficit neutrality ranked in the top three priorities for Republicans and independents and providing enough government financial help so as many uninsured people as possible can get health insurance ranked in the top three for Democrats. Creating a public option ranked near the bottom of this list among all three groups. Even so, when asked if they favor or oppose having a public plan to compete with private insurers, a substantial a majority of Americans (59%) say they support the idea.

Abortion Plays Small Role in Health Reform Opposition    Thursday, November 19, 2009
While most Americans oppose government funding of abortion, a new survey finds that concern about abortion funding plays only a small role in driving opposition to the health care reform legislation under consideration by Congress.  When health care opponents are asked in an open-ended question to describe their main reason for opposing the congressional proposals, just 3% raise the issue of abortion funding. This survey was conducted November 12-15 among 1,003 adults by PSRAI for the Pew Research Center and the Pew Forum on Religion & Public Life.

Views on the U.S. Role in Global Health Update    Thursday, November 12, 2009
The Kaiser Family Foundation Survey on the U.S. Role in Global Health Update builds on the Foundation''''s previous survey work in measuring Americans'''' attitudes toward U.S. global health investments and priorities. The survey tracks some questions that were asked earlier in 2009, and delves into some new questions about specific areas of global health spending and how aid should be distributed. Following President Obama''''s announcement of the Global Health Initiative, the survey also measures public perception of the current Administration and Congress with regards to global health efforts. As we found in March, the public continues to support maintaining or increasing spending on global health. Despite the continuing economic recession, two-thirds say the U.S. is spending too little (34 percent) or about the right amount (32 percent) on efforts to improve health for people in developing countries, while just a quarter say we are currently spending too much in this area. To view more from this survey, Click here.

Social Isolation and New Technology    Wednesday, November 04, 2009
This Pew Internet Personal Networks and Community survey finds that Americans are not as isolated as has been previously reported. People''''s use of the mobile phone and the internet is associated with larger and more diverse discussion networks. And, when we examine people''''s full personal network - their strong and weak ties - internet use in general and use of social networking services such as Facebook in particular are associated with more diverse social networks. This survey was conducted July 9, 2008 and August 10, 2008 by PSRAI for the Pew Internet & American Life Project among 2,512 adults. To view more from this survey, Click here.

End of Communism Cheered but Now with More Reservations    Monday, November 02, 2009
According to a new poll, nearly two decades after the fall of the Berlin Wall, publics of former Iron Curtain countries generally look back approvingly at the collapse of communism. Majorities of people in most former Soviet republics and Eastern European countries endorse the emergence of multiparty systems and a free market economy. This survey was conducted Aug. 27 to Sept. 24, 2009 by PSRAI for the Pew Research Center among 14,760 adults in Britain, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Lithuania, Poland, Russia, Slovakia, Spain, Ukraine and the United States. To view more from this survey, Click here.

Americans Plan to Work During Retirement    Wednesday, October 07, 2009
According to a new survey, three-quarters of American workers expect to work throughout retirement. Four in 10 (39%) say it''s because they like to work, and one third (32%) say they plan to work because they''ll need the money. Interestingly, only 15 percent of today''s retirees actually work to supplement their income. To view more from this survey, click here.

CR poll: Many Americans are unsure about getting the swine flu vaccine    Monday, October 05, 2009
A majority of U.S. adults say they are either reluctant or unsure about whether they or their children will get vaccinated for the H1N1 virus, commonly known as swine flu. And more than half of the people at high risk for flu complications don''t realize they are, according to a nationally representative survey of 1,502 adults conducted by the Consumer Reports Health Ratings Center in the first week of September. To view more from this survey, Click here.

Contrary to what marketers say, Americans Reject Tailored Advertising    Friday, October 02, 2009
According to a new survey, contrary to what many marketers claim, most adult Americans (66%) do not want marketers to tailor advertisements to their interests. Moreover, when Americans are informed of three common ways that marketers gather data about people in order to tailor ads, even higher percentages--between 73% and 86%--say they would not want such advertising. To view more from this survey, Click here.

Kaiser Health Tracking Poll - September 2009    Tuesday, September 29, 2009
The September Kaiser Health Tracking Poll finds that public support for health reform ended its summer slide, reversed course and moved modestly upwards in September. The survey also finds initial majority support for taxing expensive health plans and imposing fees on insurers to pay for reform. Fifty-seven percent of Americans now believe that tackling health care reform is more important than ever - up from 53 percent in August. The proportion of Americans who think their families would be better off if health reform passes is up six percentage points (42% versus 36% in August), and the percentage who think that the country would be better off is up eight points (to 53% from 45% in August). To view more from this survey, Click here.

Minnesota Poll: Hints of optimism about economy, personal finances    Monday, September 28, 2009
Minnesotans are feeling slightly better about the economy and their finances. But many are still feeling the effects of the recession in their day-to-day lives, according to a Star Tribune Minnesota Poll. To view more from this survey, Click here.

Obama Approval Ratings Steady, Personal Image Remains Positive    Thursday, September 17, 2009
According to a new survey, following his nationally televised address to Congress, opinion of President Barack Obama has taken a more favorable turn. Obamas job approval ratings, which had declined in the summer, have remained essentially unchanged over the past month. And the balance of opinion regarding the health care reform proposals before Congress has become a bit more positive than it was in late August, though the public is about evenly divided over those proposals. To view more from this survey, Click here.

Press Accuracy Rating Hits Two Decade Low    Sunday, September 13, 2009
The public''s assessment of the accuracy of news stories is now at its lowest level in more than two decades of Pew Research surveys, and Americans'' views of media bias and independence now match previous lows. According to a new survey, just 29% of Americans say that news organizations generally get the facts straight, while 63% say that news stories are often inaccurate. In the initial survey in this series about the news media''s performance in 1985, 55% said news stories were accurate while 34% said they were inaccurate. That percentage had fallen sharply by the late 1990s and has remained low over the last decade. To view more from this survey, Click here.

The Internet as a Diversion    Thursday, September 10, 2009
Three-quarters of online economic users--those Americans who use the internet to keep up with news about the economic recession or their own personal finances--go online to relax and take their minds off of the recession, according to an April 2009 survey by the Pew Research Center''s Internet & American Life Project. Listening to music and watching online videos are among the most common of the activities we evaluated; roughly half of all online economic users have done each of these activities to relax. Approximately one-third of online economic users have played online games or chatted with friends (on a social networking site, listserv or other online group), while an additional 22% have taken their minds off of their economic or financial circumstances by creating or posting content online. To view more from this survey, Click here.

Congressional Favorability at 24-Year Low    Wednesday, September 02, 2009
According to a new survey, Americans are extremely displeased with Congress, and there are already some signs that this could take a toll on the Democrats in the 2010 midterm elections. Currently, 37% express a favorable opinion of Congress, while 52% hold an unfavorable view. At the same time, intentions to vote Democratic in the next midterm election are markedly lower than they have been over the past four years. To view more from this survey, click here.

The Internet and Civic Engagement    Tuesday, September 01, 2009
Political and civic involvement have long been dominated by those with high levels of income and education, leading some advocates to hope that internet-based engagement might alter this pattern. However, a new report by the Pew Research Center''s Internet & American Life Project shows that the internet is not changing the fundamental socio-economic character of civic engagement in America. When it comes to online activities such as contributing money, contacting a government official or signing an online petition, the wealthy and well-educated continue to lead the way. To view more from this survey, Click here.

Kaiser Health Tracking Poll August 2009    Thursday, August 20, 2009
A slim majority of Americans continues to favor moving forward on health care reform now despite an intensifying ad war and a political climate of contentious town hall meetings that coincide with rising concerns about the reform effort, according to the August Kaiser Health Tracking Poll. Fifty-three percent of the public believes that tackling health reform is more important than ever, compared to 42 percent who say we cannot afford to take on health care reform right now. The gap between those points of view has narrowed in recent months as criticisms and doubts about reform plans seem to be registering. Sixty three percent of the public say they are "hopeful" about reform, 41 percent are "afraid" and 46 percent are simply "confused". To view more from this survey, Click here.

More See White House and GOP Leaders at Odds    Wednesday, August 19, 2009
According to a new survey, Americans are in an increasingly sour mood about Washington. Barack Obama''s approval ratings continue to inch downward and a growing proportion of Americans (63%) think that the president and Republican leaders are not working together to deal with important issues facing the nation; in June, 50% said the two sides were not cooperating. While more people continue to blame Republican leaders than blame Obama, the percentage saying the president is at fault (17%) is higher now than in June (12%) and much higher than in February (7%). To view more from this survey, Click here.

Forty Years After Woodstock, A Gentler Generation Gap    Wednesday, August 12, 2009
According to a new survey, forty years after the Woodstock music festival glorified and exacerbated the generational fractures in American life, the public today says there are big differences between younger and older adults in their values, use of technology, work ethic, and respect and tolerance for others. But this modern generation gap is a much more subdued affair than the one that raged in the 1960s, for relatively few Americans of any age see it as a source of conflict -- either in society at large or in their own families. To view more from this survey, Click here.

Budget Woes Take Toll on Views of State Governments    Tuesday, August 11, 2009
According to a new survey, with the economy wreaking havoc on state budgets, the favorability ratings of state governments have declined from a year ago. Overall, 50% of the public now holds a favorable opinion of their state government, down from 59% in April 2008. The falloff in positive views has been greater in states with large and moderate budget shortfalls than in states with smaller budget gaps. As positive ratings of state governments have declined, peoples ratings of their local governments have remained relatively stable. By nearly a two-to-one margin, Americans express a favorable opinion of their local governments (60% favorable, 32% unfavorable), which is largely unchanged from April 2008 (63% favorable). To view more from this survey, Click here.

Health Care Front-And-Center on Public's News Agenda    Thursday, July 30, 2009
According to a new survey, the public sharpened its focus on health care reform last week, following news about the debate in Washington more closely than any other story. Interest in health care reform has steadily increased in recent weeks as coverage -including a prime-time presidential news conference - has intensified. Nearly a third (31%) name the debate in Washington over health care reform as their top story, more than the share who cite the economy (19%) or the arrest of Henry Louis Gates Jr. (17%). In addition, the latest weekly News Interest Index survey by the Pew Research Center for the People and the Press, finds that more than four-in-ten (44%) say they followed health care news very closely, up from 33% in the previous week and 24% two weeks prior. To view more from this survey, Click here.

Kaiser Health Tracking Poll -- July 2009    Thursday, July 23, 2009
While Congress works through specific health reform proposals, the July Kaiser Health Tracking Poll finds a majority of the public remains supportive of taking action on health reform now, though there is some softening of support as criticisms and doubts seem to be registering. As has been the case over the past ten months, a majority of the American people (56%) continue to believe that health reform is more important than ever despite the country''s economic problems, and the public believes by a two to one margin (51% versus 23%) that the country will be better rather than worse off if Congress and the president enact health reform. More Americans think they and their family will be better off (39%) than worse off (21%) if legislation passes, with roughly a third (32%) believing it will make no difference for them or their family. To view more from this survey, Click here.

Wireless Internet Use     Wednesday, July 22, 2009
An April 2009 survey by the Pew Research Centers Internet & American Life Project shows that 56% of adult Americans have accessed the internet by wireless means, such as using a laptop, mobile device, game console, or MP3 player. The most prevalent way people get online using a wireless network is with a laptop computer; 39% of adults have done this. To view more from this survey, Click here.

The Internet and the Recession    Wednesday, July 15, 2009
According to a new survey, some 69% of all Americans have used the internet to cope with the recession as they hunt for bargains, jobs, ways to upgrade their skills, better investment strategies, housing options, and government benefits. That amounts to 88% of internet users. The internet ranks high among sources of information and advice that people are seeking during hard times, especially when it comes to their personal finances and economic circumstances. Broadband users are particularly likely to use the internet more than some other sources. At the same time, broadcast media outpace the internet as sources of news about national economics and broadcast sources still overshadow the internet among all Americans for information and advice related to their personal financial circumstances. To view more from this survey, Click here.

Public Praises Science; Scientists Fault Public, Media    Thursday, July 09, 2009
According to a new survey, Americans like science. Overwhelming majorities say that science has had a positive effect on society and that science has made life easier for most people. Most also say that government investments in science, as well as engineering and technology, pay off in the long run. And scientists are very highly rated compared with members of other professions: Only members of the military and teachers are more likely to be viewed as contributing a lot to society''s well-being. To view more from this survey, Click here.

Newly Licensed Registered Nurses Study    Friday, June 26, 2009
The Newly Licensed Registered Nurses Study is a national study following the career changes among a cohort of registered nurses (RNs) who obtained their first license to practice as RNs between August 1, 2004 and July 31, 2005. With funding from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation until 2016, we have the unique opportunity to study RN work careers for 10 years. Understanding the needs and challenges of newly licensed nurses is a priority to meet the goal of balancing the supply of and demand for RNs. This study aims to examine the work settings of newly licensed registered nurses (NLRNs) to learn what influences their employment choices. To learn more about this project, click here.

Obama's Ratings Still High Despite Policy Concerns & Public More Optimistic About the Economy, But Still Reluctant to Spend    Thursday, June 18, 2009
A solid majority of Americans (61%) continue to approve of Barack Obama''s job performance, although they express mixed views of several of his policies. An important positive sign for Obama is the public''s continued optimism that his policies will improve the economy - fully 65% express this view. A smaller majority (55%) is optimistic Obama will reduce the budget deficit over the long-term. Nonetheless, Obama''s job approval on the economy has declined from 60% in April to 52% currently. To view more from this survey, click here. Turning to the economy, the public is increasingly optimistic that the nation''s economy will improve in the next year, while a growing number also expect their personal finances to get better. But this has not caused people to open their wallets: The proportion saying they have cut back on personal spending remains as high as it was earlier this year. Nearly half of Americans (48%) say they expect economic conditions a year from now to be better than today, up from 40% in February. Over the same period, the percentage saying they expect their personal finances to improve at least some has risen from 54% to 63%. To view more from this section of the survey, click here.

Kaiser Health Tracking Poll - June 2009    Tuesday, June 16, 2009
The June Kaiser Health Tracking Poll finds remarkable stability in public opinion on health reform as Congressional committees begin to hone in on the details of their health reform bills and debate intensifies. A solid majority of the American people continue to believe that health reform is more important than ever given the country''s economic problems. To view more from this survey, click here.

Americans Feel Secure in Their Jobs Despite Rises in Joblessness    Friday, June 05, 2009
A new survey shows that although two out of three Americans polled know someone who has been laid off, eight out of ten (79%) feel "very" or "somewhat" secure in their own jobs. Though older workers feel more insecure about their job with 32 percent of workers over 50 saying they feel "insecure" about their position compared to 13 percent of workers under age 34, they may be less at risk of losing their jobs. The poll reveals that in spite of the older workers'' increased concerns, middle-aged employees have been on the receiving end of pink slips most often, with 16 percent of workers between 35 and 49 having been laid off in the past year compared to only 12 percent of workers between 50 and 64. To view more from this survey, click here.

Online Classifieds    Friday, May 22, 2009
According to a new survey, the number of online adults who have used online classified ads has more than doubled in the past four years. Almost half (49%) of internet users say they have ever used online classified sites, compared with 22% of online adults who had done so in 2005. On any given day about a tenth of internet users (9%) visit online classified sites, up from 4% in 2005. To view more from this survey, Click here.

Trends in Political Values and Core Attitudes    Thursday, May 21, 2009
The long-term values study project has been tracking a broad range of beliefs and attitudes that shape public opinion and influence voting behavior. The project began in 1987 and has been updated 14 times over the past 22 years. As the Obama era begins, the survey finds that centrism has emerged as a dominant factor in public opinion. The political values and core attitudes of the American public show little overall ideological movement. The growing political middle is steadfastly mixed in its beliefs about government, the free market and other values that underlie views on contemporary issues and policies. To view more, click here.

Americans Want Government Branches to Work Together    Friday, May 08, 2009
Americans expect the three branches of government to work together to solve state problems such as prison overcrowding and caring for abused and neglected children, according to a new nationwide public opinion survey by the National Center for State Courts. The poll, conducted at a time when most states are reporting budget deficits and many state courts are cutting costs, is believed to be the first ever survey to measure the public''s perceptions of how the executive, legislative and judicial branches work together on public policy issues that affect the administration of justice. To view more from this survey, click here.

Minnesota Poll: Boosts to economy get a thumbs up    Tuesday, April 28, 2009
A new Star Tribune Minnesota Poll found strong support for Obama''s budget and economic stimulus policies, though respondents were more evenly split on the administration''s efforts to rescue the troubled auto and financial industries. To view more from this survey, Click here.

The 2009 Survey of Americans on HIV/AIDS    Tuesday, April 28, 2009
Less than a year after the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recalculated the size of the HIV/AIDS epidemic and announced that there were 40 percent more new HIV infections each year than previously believed, a new survey by the Kaiser Family Foundation finds that Americans'' sense of urgency about HIV/AIDS as a national health problem has fallen dramatically and their concern about HIV as a personal risk has also declined, even among some groups at higher risk. To view more from this survey, Click here.

Faith in Flux: Changes in Religious Affiliation in the U.S.    Monday, April 27, 2009
Americans change religious affiliation early and often. In total, about half of American adults have changed religious affiliation at least once during their lives. Most people who change their religion leave their childhood faith before age 24, and many of those who change religion do so more than once. These are among the key findings of a new survey conducted by the Pew Research Center''s Forum on Religion & Public Life. The survey documents the fluidity of religious affiliation in the U.S. and describes in detail the patterns and reasons for change. To view more from this survey, Click here.

Minnesota Poll: Strong support for Obama as state's mood improves    Monday, April 27, 2009
Nearly 100 days into his presidency, Barack Obama has the approval of a strong majority of Minnesotans, amid an improving but fragile mood about the general direction of the nation. A new Star Tribune Minnesota Poll finds that 62 percent of adults in the state approve of the job Obama is doing as president, even as slightly more than half -- 51 percent -- say the country is off on the "wrong track." To view more from this survey, Click here.

Kaiser Health Tracking Poll - April 2009    Thursday, April 23, 2009
The April Kaiser Health Tracking Poll finds that six in ten Americans continues to say that they or a member of their household have delayed or skipped health care in the past year. A solid majority of the public believes health care reform is more important than ever because of current economic problems. The country''s overall economic problems have not dampened their interest in pursuing health care reform: a solid majority of the public (59%) believes health care reform is more important than ever compared with the thirty-seven percent who say we can''t afford health reform because of economic problems. To view more from this survey, click here.

Obama at 100 Days    Thursday, April 23, 2009
As he approaches the 100-day mark of his presidency, Barack Obama''s job approval ratings are higher than those of his most recent predecessors. However, the 44th president is even more distinguished by his strong personal popularity. Fully 73% of Americans - including as many as 46% of Republicans - hold a favorable view of Obama as a person. Fewer people held favorable impressions of George W. Bush (61%) and Bill Clinton (60%) early in their first years. To view more from this survey, click here.

Partisan Bickering Is Back, Says Public    Wednesday, April 08, 2009
Shortly before President Obama took office in January, the public was uncharacteristically optimistic that Republicans and Democrats would work together more to solve problems in the year ahead. Less than three months later, those expectations have faded and most see a return to partisan politics in Washington. According to a new survey, a majority (53%) currently says that Republicans and Democrats have been bickering and opposing each more than usual, while just a quarter (25%) say the two sides have been working together more. In January, twice as many (50%) said they expected Republicans and Democrats to work together more. To view more from this survey, Click here.

Newsweek Poll: One Nation Under God?    Tuesday, April 07, 2009
A Newsweek poll examines American''s attitudes toward religion, the role it plays in people''s personal lives, and opinions about religion''''s impact on U.S. politics. The new poll shows some shifts in public attitudes about the role religion plays in American society under new President Barack Obama. Two-thirds (68%) of the public now say that religion is "losing influence" in American society, while just 19% say religion''s influence is on the rise. The proportion of Americans who say religion "can answer all or most of today''s problems" is now at a historic low of 48%. During the Bush and Clinton years, that figure never dropped below 58 percent. To view more from this survey, click here.

Newsweek Poll: Mixed Review for Obama    Friday, April 03, 2009
Barack Obama''s job performance rating in the Newsweek poll is up a few points since the last poll of one month ago. Currently, 61% say they approve of the way Obama is handling his duties while 27% disapprove. An early March poll showed 58% approve, 26% disapprove. Obama''s ratings for his handling of many current issues fall significantly below his overall approval rating. To view more from this survey, click here.

Obama's Approval Rating Slips Amid Division Over Economic Proposals    Monday, March 16, 2009
According to a new survey, President Barack Obama''s approval rating has slipped, as a growing number of Americans see him listening more to his party''s liberals than to its moderates and many voice opposition to some of his key economic proposals. Obama''s job approval rating has slipped from 64% in February to 59% currently, while disapproval has jumped from 17% to 26% over this period. To view more from this survey, Click here.

Newsweek Poll: The Economy, the Republicans and Obama    Friday, March 06, 2009
In the first Newsweek poll conducted since he took office, Barack Obama scores a 58% approval rating overall. Seventy-two percent of Americans say they have a favorable opinion of him, a higher favorability rating than he received in the Newsweek poll as a presidential candidate during campaign year 2008. But the new president is having only slightly more success winning over rank-and-file Republicans than he has convincing Republican members of Congress to back his economic proposals. Only a third (33%) of self-identified Republicans, compared with nearly nine in 10 (86%) Democrats, say they approve of the way Obama is handling his job. About half (49%) of Republicans say they disapprove. To view more from this survey, click here.

Kaiser Health Tracking Poll - February 2009    Wednesday, February 25, 2009
The first Kaiser Health Tracking Poll of 2009 finds the public is increasingly worried about the affordability and availability of care, with many postponing or skipping treatments due to cost in the past year and a notable minority forced into serious financial straits due to medical bills. Slightly more than half (53%) of Americans say their household cut back on health care due to cost concerns in the past 12 months. The most common actions reported are relying on home remedies and over-the-counter drugs rather than visiting a doctor or skipping dental care. To view more from this survey, click here.

Obama Faces Familiar Divisions Over Anti-Terror Policies    Wednesday, February 18, 2009
According to a new survey, President Obama receives positive ratings for his handling of terrorism and most Americans say his administration''s policies will reduce the likelihood of another major attack on the United States. But as in recent years, the public remains deeply divided over how best to defend the nation against the threat of terrorism. Americans approve of Obama''s handling of the threat of terrorism by more than two-to-one (50% approve vs. 21% disapprove), while 29% offer no opinion. Yet opinion is much more closely divided over Obama''s decision to close the U.S. military prison at Guantanamo Bay in the next year. Fewer than half (46%) approve of the decision while 39% disapprove. To view more from this survey, Click here.

Support for Stimulus Plan Slips, But Obama Rides High    Monday, February 09, 2009
According to a new survery, after weeks of intense debate over President Obama''s economic stimulus plan, a narrow majority of Americans (51%) who have heard about the $800 billion plan say it is a good idea, while 34% say it is a bad idea. In January, the balance of opinion regarding the plan was more positive: 57% of those who had heard about the proposal viewed it positively, compared with just 22% who viewed it negatively. To view more from this survey, Click here.

For Nearly Half of America, Grass Is Greener Somewhere Else    Thursday, January 29, 2009
A new national survey by the Pew Research Center''s Social & Demographic Trends project finds that nearly half (46%) of the public would rather live in a different type of community from the one they''re living in now -- a sentiment that is most prevalent among city dwellers. When asked about specific metropolitan areas where they would like to live, respondents rank Denver, San Diego and Seattle at the top of a list of 30 cities, and Detroit, Cleveland and Cincinnati at the bottom. To view more from this survey, Click here.

Generations Online in 2009    Wednesday, January 28, 2009
Over half of the adult internet population is between 18 and 44 years old. But larger percentages of older generations are online now than in the past, and they are doing more activities online, according to surveys taken from 2006-2008. To view more from this survey, Click here.

Economy, Jobs Trump All Other Policy Priorities In 2009    Thursday, January 22, 2009
According to a new survey, as Barack Obama takes office, the public''s focus is overwhelmingly on domestic policy concerns particularly the economy. Strengthening the nation''s economy and improving the job situation stand at the top of the public''s list of domestic priorities for 2009. Meanwhile, the priority placed on issues such as the environment, crime, illegal immigration and even reducing health care costs has fallen off from a year ago. To view more from this survey, Click here.

Newsweek Poll: Yin and Yang    Friday, January 16, 2009
A recent Newsweek poll finds the public rallying around Barack Obama, just days away from his inauguration as this country''''s 44th president. Two-thirds (66%) of U.S. adults are optimistic that the new Obama administration will be able to improve the way things are going in this country. Despite some controversies about a few of his nominees, about seven in 10 (68%) continue to say they approve of Obama''''s choices for cabinet-level positions. Americans remain unhappy with the state of the nation. The impact of knowing Obama will soon replace George W. Bush in the oval office has been modest. Just 20% of adults say they are satisfied with the way things are going in the country. To view more from this survey, click here.

Modest Backing For Israel in Gaza Crisis    Tuesday, January 13, 2009
According to a new survey, Americans have a mixed view of the war in the Gaza Strip, and see it in much the same way as they viewed Israel''s conflict with Hezbollah in 2006. While continuing to express strong general support for Israel, the public offers limited approval of Israel''s decision to take military action in Gaza. However, Hamas is largely seen as primarily responsible for the outbreak of violence. To view more from this survey, Click here.

Post-Election Voter Engagement    Tuesday, December 30, 2008
According to a new survey, voters expect that the level of public engagement they experienced with Barack Obama during the campaign, much of it occurring online, will continue into the early period of his new administration. A majority of Obama voters expect to carry on efforts to support his policies and try to persuade others to back his initiatives in the coming year; a substantial number expect to hear directly from Obama and his team; and a notable cohort say they have followed the transition online. To view more from this survey, Click here.

Calling Cell Phones in 08 Pre-Election Polls    Thursday, December 18, 2008
According to a new study, public opinion polling faced many challenges during the 2008 presidential election. None was more daunting than the rising number of "cell phone only" voters who could not be reached over the landline telephones. The latest estimates from the National Health Interview Survey -- the most comprehensive measure available -- suggest that nearly 18% of households are wireless only, and the NEP Exit Polls conducted on Nov. 4 found 20% of Election Day voters saying they were cell only. To view more from this report, Click here.

The Future of the Internet III    Sunday, December 14, 2008
A new survey of internet leaders, activists and analysts shows they expect major tech advances as the phone becomes a primary device for online access, voice-recognition improves, artificial and virtual reality become more embedded in everyday life, and the architecture of the internet itself improves. To view more from this survey, Click here.

Americans Cut Back on Spending    Thursday, December 11, 2008
Americans continue to have a bleak outlook of the national economy as well as their own financial situations, according to a new poll. Ninety-two percent of the public rates the national economy as only fair or poor, and a substantial majority (61%) judges their personal finances that way. More consumers say they are cutting back on purchases or reconsidering their saving and retirement decisions. As a result of what''s been happening with the economy recently, 60% of Americans say they are changing the way their money is saved or invested, up from just 48% two months ago; 32% say they have adjusted their retirement plans. Substantial minorities also say they are either delaying or shelving plans to make major household purchases (45%) or buy a home or make major improvements (44%). And fully 73% say that they plan to cut back on holiday gifts this year. To view more from this survey, click here.

Adults and Video Games    Sunday, December 07, 2008
According to a new survey, more than half - 53% - of all American adults play video games of some kind, whether on a computer, on a gaming console, on a cell phone or other handheld device, on a portable gaming device, or online. To view more from this survey, Click here.

Newsweek Poll: Gay Marriage and President-Elect Obama    Friday, December 05, 2008
A national Newsweek poll finds majority public support (55%) for legally-sanctioned gay and lesbian unions or partnerships, but a much lower level of support (39%) for giving full-marriage rights to same-sex couples. Public opinion has become increasingly supportive of gay rights over the years, but many people who believe committed same-sex couples deserve the same rights as married heterosexual couples still oppose the idea of gay marriage. The latest poll finds broad public support for the way Barack Obama is handling his presidential transition. Seven in 10 adult Americans say they approve of the way he has handled things in general (72%) and the same number (72%) say they approve of his choices to fill Cabinet-level positions so far. To view more from this survey, click here.

Survey Reveals Women's Priorities for Obama    Sunday, November 23, 2008
According to a new survey, more than three-fourths of young women ages 18-29 and known as Generation Y want incoming President Barack Obama to make civil rights and racial justice top priorities of his administration. While Obama''s election as the nation''s first black president was interpreted by many as a sign of racial progress, findings in the survey suggest that much work still needs to be done. To view more from this survey, click here.

When Technology Fails    Sunday, November 16, 2008
According to a new survey, half (48%) of tech users need help from others in getting new devices and services to work, and many experience tech outages when there is a glitch with their home internet connection, computer, or cell phone. Coping with these failures is a hassle for many tech users and helps to distance them from technology use. To view more from this survey, Click here.

High Marks for the Campaign, a High Bar for Obama    Thursday, November 13, 2008
According to a new survey, a week after the election, voters are feeling good about themselves, the presidential campaign and Barack Obama. Looking ahead, they have high expectations for the Obama administration, with two-thirds predicting that he will have a successful first term. To view more from this survey, Click here.

Final Week Pre-Election Polls Cited for Accuracy    Friday, November 07, 2008
The two pre-election polls directed by PSRAI in the final week of the campaign both proved to be highly accurate in their estimates of the election outcome. The Pew Research Center''s final estimate of the popular vote was one of two national polls to hit the final results right on the nose (52% Obama, 46% McCain). To view more from this survey, Click here. Our final pre-election poll for the Minneapolis Star-Tribune showed Barack Obama leading by 11 points in the Gopher State. Official totals now put his margin of victory at 10 points. No other poll was more accurate in forecasting the outcome of the presidential and U.S. Senate races in Minnesota this year. To view more from this survey, Click here.

Minnesota Poll: Franken, Coleman are neck and neck    Sunday, November 02, 2008
The Minnesota U.S. Senate race remains a tossup on the final weekend of the campaign, with the outcome likely to be decided by who can snatch away the most voters from third-party contender Dean Barkley. A new Star Tribune Minnesota Poll shows DFLer Al Franken clinging to a slim lead over Republican Sen. Norm Coleman among likely voters, 42 percent to 38 percent. To view more from this survey, Click here.

Minnesota Poll: Obama's big lead solid at the stretch    Sunday, November 02, 2008
The presidential race in Minnesota appears to have stabilized, with Democrat Barack Obama continuing to hold a commanding lead over Republican John McCain, according to a new Star Tribune Minnesota Poll. The poll shows Obama leading McCain 53 percent to 42 percent among likely voters. That 11 percentage-point gap is unchanged from the previous Minnesota Poll, conducted two weeks ago. To view more from this survey, Click here.

Obama Leads McCain 52% to 46% in Campaign's Final Days    Sunday, November 02, 2008
Barack Obama holds a significant lead over John McCain in the final days of Campaign 2008. The Pew Research Center''s final pre-election poll of 2,587 likely voters, conducted Oct. 29-Nov. 1, finds 49% supporting or leaning to Obama, compared with 42% for McCain; minor party candidates draw 2%, and 7% are undecided. This is a smaller Obama lead than in previous Pew Research Center polls, reflecting some gains by McCain. Obama''s lead had been 52% to 36% among registered voters Oct. 23-26, but in the current poll it has slipped to 50% to 39%. McCain also is getting the boost that Republican candidates typically receive when the sample is narrowed from the base of 2,995 registered voters to those most likely to vote. To view more from this survey, Click here.

McCain Support Continues Downward Spiral    Tuesday, October 28, 2008
Barack Obama leads John McCain by a 52% to 36% margin according to a new national poll of 1,325 registered voters. This is the fourth consecutive survey that has found support for the Republican candidate edging down. In contrast, since early October weekly surveys have shown about the same number of respondents saying they back Obama. When the sample is narrowed to those most likely to vote, Obama leads by 53% to 38%. To view more from this survey, click here.

Newsweek Poll: Palin's Impact and Obama's Vulnerabilities    Friday, October 24, 2008
As the campaign moves toward its final week, a Newsweek poll finds Barack Obama leading John McCain by a 13-point margin (53%-40%) among all registered voters nationwide, and by 12 points among likely voters (53%-41%). This is the biggest lead for any presidential candidate in a late October Newsweek poll since 1984, when Ronald Reagan led Walter Mondale by 57%-40%, 17 points. That year, Reagan won by popular vote by 59%-41% and carried 49 states. However, it should be noted that big leads in presidential elections can be cut substantially in the final two weeks. The choice of Sarah Palin, which once gave McCain''s candidacy a lift, is now clearly a drag on the GOP ticket. Nearly one third (31%) of registered voters say the Palin pick makes them less likely to vote for McCain, more than the 19% who say she makes them more likely to support McCain. To view more from this survey, click here.

Growing Doubts About McCain's Judgment, Age and Campaign Conduct    Tuesday, October 21, 2008
According to a new poll, Barack Obama''s lead over John McCain has steadily increased since mid-September, when the race was essentially even. Shortly after the first presidential debate on Sept. 26, Obama moved to a 49% to 42% lead; that margin inched up to 50% to 40% in a poll taken just after the second debate. Currently, Obama enjoys his widest margin yet over McCain among registered voters, at 52% to 38%. When the sample of voters is narrowed to those most likely to vote, Obama leads by 53% to 39%. To view more from this survey, Click here.

Minnesota Poll: 3-way Senate race up for grabs    Tuesday, October 21, 2008
With two weeks to go until Election Day, the exceptionally volatile and closely watched U.S. Senate race in Minnesota has tightened up. The latest Star Tribune Minnesota Poll shows DFLer Al Franken at 39 percent to Republican Sen. Norm Coleman''s 36 percent. Independence Party candidate Dean Barkley was the choice of 18 percent of likely voters. To view more from this survey, Click here.

Minnesota Poll: Obama holds a wide lead over McCain    Monday, October 20, 2008
Democrat Barack Obama continues to hold a wide lead over Republican John McCain in Minnesota, largely because most likely voters believe Obama would do a better job with the economy, according to a new Star Tribune Minnesota Poll. To view more from this survey, Click here.

Public Not Desperate About Economy or Personal Finances; Obama Clearer than McCain in Addressing Crisis    Wednesday, October 15, 2008
Americans are concerned about the nation''s economic problems almost to the exclusion of every other issue, and they register the lowest level of national satisfaction ever measured in a Pew Research Center survey. Just 11% say they are satisfied with the way things are going in the country down 14 points in the past month alone. To view more from this survey, Click here.

Newsweek Poll: Obama Has Double-Digit Lead    Friday, October 10, 2008
Barack Obama leads John McCain by an 11-point margin (52%-41%) among registered voters nationwide in a Newsweek poll conducted in the days following the second presidential debate. In the last Newsweek poll, conducted one month ago, both candidates were tied at 46%. In addition to gaining ground overall, Obama has also increased his strong support. He now leads by an identical 11-point margin among voters who declare themselves as strong supporters of a candidate (38%-27%). John McCain faces an uphill battle in the weeks ahead, with just one more presidential debate remaining. The Arizona Senator would have to win over about two-thirds of the voters still up for grabs - soft supporters and undecideds - in order to reach the 50% mark. To view more from this survey, click here.

Minnesota Poll: Obama leaps ahead of McCain    Sunday, October 05, 2008
Democratic presidential candidate Barack Obama has opened up a commanding lead in Minnesota over Republican John McCain, according to a new Star Tribune Minnesota Poll. The poll, conducted last week, found that 55 percent support Obama, while 37 percent back McCain. To view more from this survey, Click here.

Kaiser Health Tracking Poll: Election 2008 -- September 2008    Wednesday, October 01, 2008
The latest Kaiser Health Tracking Poll: Election 2008 finds that health care has crept up in importance as an election issue in recent months among a key voting group: political independents, who ranked it as highly as Democrats did in this poll. Roughly one in four (26%) independents rank health care as one of the top issues they would "most like to hear the presidential candidates talk about." Health care''s importance has risen among independents by eight percentage points since April. At the same time, health care has dropped even further down Republicans'' priority list (now mentioned by 11%, a new low) and stayed roughly stable among Democrats (25%). To view more from this survey, Click here.

Obama Boosts Leadership Image and Regains Lead Over McCain    Wednesday, October 01, 2008
Barack Obama has achieved a significant lead over John McCain in the days following the first presidential debate. Pew''s new survey conducted Sept. 27-29 finds that Obama has moved to a 49% to 42% advantage among registered voters. The race was virtually even in mid-September and early August. Obama had not led McCain by a significant margin in a Pew survey since June. To view more from this survey, Click here.

Cell Phones and the 2008 Vote    Tuesday, September 23, 2008
Current polling in the 2008 presidential election shows a very tight race between Democrat Barack Obama and Republican John McCain. In part because of the strong support Obama is attracting among younger voters, and as the number of Americans who are reachable only by cell phones rises, interest continues to grow in the question of whether public opinion polls that do not include cell phones are accurately measuring the relative levels of support for the two candidates. To view more from this survey click here.

McCain Gains On Issues, But Stalls As Candidate Of Change    Thursday, September 18, 2008
With two eventful and closely followed political conventions now in their rearview mirror, voters'' views of Barack Obama and John McCain have changed in some ways, yet remain the same in others. What has not changed is that the race remains very close: a national survey of 2,509 voters interviewed Sept. 9-14 on both landline phones and cell phones finds that 46% support Obama, while 44% support John McCain. These results are almost identical to those in Pew''s pre-convention survey in early August, which had 46% backing Obama and 43% McCain. To view more from this survey, Click here.

Teens, Video Games, and Civics    Tuesday, September 16, 2008
According to a new survey, game playing is universal, with almost all teens playing games and at least half playing games on a given day. Game playing experiences are diverse, with the most popular games falling into the racing, puzzle, sports, action and adventure categories. Game playing is also social, with most teens playing games with others at least some of the time and can incorporate many aspects of civic and political life. To view more from this survey, Click here.

Minnesota Poll: Obama, McCain are dead even in state    Sunday, September 14, 2008
Minnesota has become a battleground in a presidential campaign that has dramatically tightened nationwide. A new Star Tribune Minnesota Poll shows that the race is now a dead heat between Barack Obama and John McCain, each supported by 45 percent of likely voters in the state. To view more from this survey, click here.

Newsweek Poll: Post Conventions    Friday, September 12, 2008
After the political conventions, the presidential race is deadlocked according to the latest Newsweek poll. Barack Obama and John McCain are each supported by 46% of registered voters nationwide. Obama had a marginal lead (44%-41%) in the last Newsweek poll conducted in July before the conventions. The contours of the race have changed, as McCain''s once soft support has firmed up. To view more from this survey, click here.

Use of Cloud Computing Applications and Services    Friday, September 12, 2008
Some 69% of online Americans use webmail services, store data online, or use software programs such as word processing applications whose functionality is located on the web. Online users who take advantage of cloud applications say they like the convenience of having access to data and applications from any Web-connected device. However, their message to providers of such services is: Let''s keep the data between us. To view more from this survey, Click here.

Voter Response to the Conventions in Perspective: McCain Gets Boost, Now the Hard Part     Thursday, September 11, 2008
According to a new survey, John McCain came out of the convention period surging in the polls, with an energized base of supporters after his bold choice of Alaska Governor Sarah Palin as his running mate. Considering the negative political environment the GOP faces this year, that is no small achievement. But polling by Princeton Survey Research Associates International (PSRAI) during the convention period, and comparison data from Newsweek polls in previous elections, finds McCain in a less favorable position today than other recent incumbent party presidential candidates after their nominating conventions.

Podcast Downloading 2008    Thursday, August 28, 2008
According to a new survey, as gadgets with digital audio capability proliferate, podcast downloading continues to increase. Currently, 19% of all internet users say they have downloaded a podcast so they could listen to it or view it later. This most recent percentage is up from 12% of internet users who reported downloading podcasts in our August 2006 survey and 7% in our February-April 2006 survey. Still, podcasting has yet to become a fixture in the everyday lives of internet users, as very few internet users download podcasts on a typical day. To view more from this survey, Click here.

Men or Women: Who's the Better Leader?    Monday, August 25, 2008
Americans believe women have the right stuff to be political leaders. When it comes to honesty, intelligence and a handful of other character traits they value highly in leaders, the public rates women superior to men, according to a new nationwide Pew Research Center Social and Demographic Trends survey. To view more from this survey, click here.

National Wildlife Federation's (NWF) Campus Environment 2008: A National Report Card on Sustainability in Higher Education    Thursday, August 21, 2008
According to a new survey, a large majority of colleges and universities continue to say that environmental or sustainability programs fit the culture and values of their campus. Solid majorities again say environmental or sustainability programs are good public relations and are cost effective. A sizeable minority say their programs are helpful in recruiting students as well as faculty and staff. Notably, schools have grown more appreciative of these benefits since 2001. To view more from this survey, click here.

Kaiser Health Tracking Poll: Election 2008 -- August 2008    Tuesday, August 19, 2008
The latest Kaiser Health Tracking Poll: Election 2008 poll finds that one in four (24%) Americans continue to struggle with paying for health care. Health care ranks as a "serious problem" above paying for food (18%), problems with debt (16%), and paying the rent or mortgage (15%) and below paying for gas (37%) or getting a good paying job or raise in pay (26%). To view more from this survey, click here.

Inflation Staggers Public, Economy Still Seen as Fixable    Thursday, July 31, 2008
According to a new poll, the public continues to be extremely downbeat about the national economy. Just 10% say the economy is in good shape, while 72% say the economy is either in a recession (54%) or a depression (18%). On a personal level, concerns about rising prices have surged. Beyond widespread anxiety about energy costs, a growing number of Americans say it is difficult for them to afford food. To view more from this survey, Click here.

America's Four Middle Classes    Tuesday, July 29, 2008
There isn''t one American middle class; there are four. Each is different from the others in its attitudes, outlook and financial circumstance--sometimes in ways that defy traditional stereotypes of the middle class, according to an analysis of a recent national survey conducted by the Pew Research Center Social and Demographic Trends Project. To view more from this survey, Click here.

Newsweek Poll: Obama and God    Friday, July 11, 2008
The latest Newsweek poll finds Barack Obama leading John McCain by a margin of 44% to 41% among registered voters nationally. The current statistical tie is a significant change from last month''s poll, which showed the Illinois Senator with a double-digit lead, 51% to 36%. While some of this difference is likely explained by sampling error, the closer margin may also reflect more stable poll numbers as a "bounce" in support for Obama after his rival, Hillary Clinton, left the race and endorsed him has waned. To view more from this survey, click here.

Likely Rise in Voter Turnout Bodes Well for Democrats    Thursday, July 10, 2008
The latest national survey by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press, finds greater public interest and engagement in the presidential election than during the five previous campaigns. Fully 72% say they are giving quite a lot of thought to this election - by far the highest percentage at this point in the campaign since 1988. The proportion saying they are more interested in politics this year than during the previous campaign is greater than it has been since 1992. And public interest in campaign news has been consistently higher than in recent elections. To view more from this survey, Click here.

Newsweek Poll: What Do Americans Know?    Saturday, June 28, 2008
The most recent Newsweek poll quizzed the public on a variety of topics, ranging from politics and government to foreign affairs, economics, science and health, and the arts. To view more from this survey, click here.

Kaiser Health Tracking Poll: Election 2008 -- June 2008    Wednesday, June 25, 2008
The latest Kaiser Health Tracking Poll: Election 2008 poll finds that the recent economic downturn continues to create serious financial problems for most Americans. When asked about the impact of recent economic changes, nearly six in 10 adults (59 percent) report having a "serious problem" with one of seven major financial issues, including one in four who cite paying for health care as a serious problem. To view more from this survey, click here.

Newsweek Poll: Obama Gaining Ground    Friday, June 20, 2008
A Newsweek poll shows Barack Obama has gained significant ground in the presidential race against John McCain. The Illinois Senator now has a double-digit lead, 51% to 36%, over his GOP rival among registered voters nationwide. In the previous Newsweek poll, completed in late May when Hillary Clinton was still fighting hard for the Democratic nomination, Obama managed no better than a 46%-46% tie with McCain. Obama is running much stronger at this point in the race than his two most recent predecessors, John Kerry and Al Gore, who both failed in their bids to win the White House. To view more from this survey, click here.

How Many Are Underinsured? Trends Among U.S. Adults, 2003 and 2007    Tuesday, June 10, 2008
The number of underinsured U.S. adults that is, people who have health coverage that does not adequately protect them from high medical expenses has risen dramatically, a Commonwealth Fund study finds. As of 2007, there were an estimated 25 million underinsured adults in the United States, up 60 percent from 2003. To view more from this survey, click here.

Democratic Party's Favorables Rise, Congress Still Unpopular    Tuesday, June 03, 2008
According to a new survey, the overall image of the Democratic Party has improved over the past year, although the Democratic-led Congress remains widely unpopular. A majority of Americans (57%) say they have a favorable view of the Democratic Party, up six points since July 2007 and 10 points since July 2006. Public attitudes toward Congress remain very negative. Currently, just 41% of the public expresses a favorable opinion of Congress, with 51% unfavorable; that is identical to opinions of Congress in July 2007. To view more from this survey, click here.

Rite of Passage? Why Young Adults Become Uninsured and How New Policies Can Help, 2008 Update    Friday, May 30, 2008
According to a new survey, young adults, ages 19 to 29, are one of the largest segments of the U.S. population without health insurance: 13.7 million lacked coverage in 2006. They often lose coverage at age 19 or upon high school or college graduation almost two of five (38%) high school graduates who do not enroll in college and one-third of college graduates are uninsured for a time during the first year after graduation. To view more from this survey, click here.

Obama and McCain in a General Election Matchup    Thursday, May 29, 2008
According to a new survey, Barack Obama is the clear favorite of Democratic voters for their party''s presidential nomination as the end of the primary season approaches. Obama currently holds a wide 54% to 41% lead over Hillary Clinton. But when the Illinois Democrat is tested against John McCain in a general election matchup, he now runs about even against the presumptive Republican nominee. Previously, Obama had led McCain by modest margins in three surveys conducted since late February. To view more from this survey, click here.

Newsweek Poll: Obama and the Race Factor    Friday, May 23, 2008
As he closes in on the Democratic nomination, Barack Obama faces a unique obstacle to victory over John McCain in November - his race. The results from a recent Newsweek poll suggest that Obama''s problems winning white support in some places - as seen in Hillary Clinton''s big wins in Kentucky and West Virginia - will make it more difficult for him to put together a winning coalition for the general election. In a political environment very favorable to the Democrats, Obama manages only a tie in a trial heat against McCain (46%-46%). By comparison, in party identification that Democrats have a 15-point advantage among registered voters nationally - 53% consider themselves Democrats or lean to the party, while 38% self-identify as Republicans or lean Republican. Meanwhile, Clinton remains competitive in the battle for voter support among Democrats and Democratic leaners nationally, even as her chances of victory dwindle. To view more from this survey, click here.

Opinion of Oprah More Politicized, Gore's Ratings Improve Favorability of Leading Figures    Wednesday, May 14, 2008
A new survey shows that Oprah Winfrey''s image has not recovered from last year, following a slip in her popularity after endorsing of Barack Obama. Long one of America''s best-known and best-liked media figures, opinions about the talk show host have become increasingly divided along partisan political lines. Currently, 68% of Americans say they have a favorable opinion of Winfrey, which is largely unchanged from a Gallup survey in October 2007 (66%). At that time, Gallup found that positive views of Winfrey had declined by eight points, from 74%, since January 2007. To view more from this survey, click here.

Pope Benedict's Image Improves Following U.S. Visit    Tuesday, May 06, 2008
According to a new survey, following his first visit to the United States as spiritual leader of the world''s Catholics, Pope Benedict XVI is viewed more favorably than he was a few weeks before his trip. Currently, 61% of Americans say they have a favorable impression of the pope, up from 52% in late March. To view more from this survey, click here.

2008 Financial Literacy Survey    Tuesday, April 29, 2008
According to a new survey, one in every 10 Americans with a mortgage or roughly 10 million adults report being late or missing a mortgage payment in the last year. Adding more stress to the current housing market, almost one-quarter of Americans say they do not know enough about owning a home to consider buying one. While a majority of the public report that they pay their bills on time and do not have any debts in collections, a notable minority has fallen behind and is struggling with seven percent or roughly 15 million adults either getting calls from collectors or seriously considering filing for bankruptcy. Higher income households and older Americans are more likely to stay on top of their bills. And whites and Latinos are more likely to pay their bills on time and stay clear of collections than blacks. Alarmingly, only 59 percent or roughly 23 million of the young adults in Generation Y, those ages 18-29, pay their bills on time every month. That translates into millions of tomorrows leaders, those who will drive the engine of our economy for years to come, who are not practicing a most basic financial principle. And the previous generation of consumers, those ages 30-49, also do not appear to be modeling good financial behavior. To view more from this survey, click here.

Newsweek Poll: Race, Class & Obama    Saturday, April 26, 2008
A new Newsweek poll shows Barack Obama losing ground on a number of key survey measures. The double-digit lead for Obama in preference for the nomination among registered Democrats and Democratic leaners has been reduced to seven points (48%-41%). Obama''s favorability rating has dropped further since last week''s poll. Four in 10 (40%) registered voters now say they have an unfavorable opinion of him. Only a week ago, the Illinois Senator was widely viewed as the Democratic candidate most likely to defeat John McCain. With another win in Pennsylvania, Clinton has cut into Obama''s advantage as the stronger candidate for the fall. Currently, 46% believe Obama is more electable while 38% give Clinton the edge. One week ago, Obama led on this measure by 55% to 33%. To view more click from this survey, click here.

Writing, Technology and Teens    Thursday, April 24, 2008
According to a new survey, teenagers lives are filled with writing. All teens write for school, and 93% of teens say they write for their own pleasure. Most notably, the vast majority of teens have eagerly embraced written communication with their peers as they share messages on their social network pages, in emails and instant messages online, and through fast-paced thumb choreography on their cell phones. Parents believe that their children write more as teens than they did at that age. To view more from this survey, Click here.

Newsweek Poll: Who's More Electable?    Friday, April 18, 2008
A Newsweek poll reveals Barack Obama has the momentum going into next Tuesday''s Pennsylvania Democratic primary. Obama now leads Hillary Clinton by double digits in the battle for support among registered Democrats and leaners nationwide, 54% to 35%. The previous Newsweek poll in March showed the two Democrats locked in a statistical tie (45% Obama-44% Clinton). The new poll shows Obama ahead among women as well as men, and voters age 60 and older as well as younger voters. A majority of registered voters see Clinton as dishonest and untrustworthy, suggesting that Clinton''s being caught telling a tall tale about landing in Bosnia under sniper fire has had a more negative impact with voters than the recent Obama controversies. Still, poll results indicate both Clinton and Obama have been harmed by the attacks they have directed at each other, as both candidates have seen a drop in favorabilty since March. To view more from this survey, click here.

Inside the Middle Class: Bad Times Hit the Good Life    Wednesday, April 09, 2008
According to a new survey, Americans feel stuck in their tracks. A majority of survey respondents say that in the past five years, they either haven''t moved forward in life (25%) or have fallen backwards (31%). This is the most downbeat short-term assessment of personal progress in nearly half a century of polling by the Pew Research Center and the Gallup organization. When asked to measure their progress over a longer time frame, Americans are more upbeat. Nearly two-thirds say they have a higher standard of living than their parents had when their parents were their age. To view more from this survey, Click here.

Obama Weathers the Wright Storm, Clinton Faces Credibility Problem    Thursday, March 27, 2008
According to a new survey, the videos of Rev. Jeremiah Wright''s controversial sermons and Barack Obama''s subsequent speech on race and politics have attracted more public attention than any events thus far in the 2008 presidential campaign. A majority of the public (51%) said they heard "a lot" about the videos, and an even larger percentage (54%) said they heard a lot about Obama''s speech, according to the weekly News Interest Index. Most voters aware of the sermons say they were personally offended by Wright''s comments, and a sizable minority (35%) says that their opinion of Obama has grown less favorable because of Wright''s statements. To view more from this survey, click here.

Financial Woes Now Overshadow All Other Concerns for Journalists    Monday, March 17, 2008
According to a new survey, the financial crisis facing news organizations is so grave that it is now overshadowing concerns about the quality of news coverage, the flagging credibility of the news media, and other problems that have been very much on the minds of journalists over the past decade. An ever larger majority of journalists at national media outlets -- 62% -- says that journalism is going in the wrong direction, an increase from the 51% who expressed this view in 2004. Half of internet journalists and about the same proportion of local journalists (49%) also take a negative view of the state of their profession. To view more from this survey, click here.

Newsweek Poll: The Democratic Presidential Race    Monday, March 10, 2008
After Hillary Clinton''s comeback primary victories in Ohio and Texas, the Democratic presidential race is a dead heat nationally. According to the latest Newsweek poll, Barack Obama has a statistically insignificant one-point lead (45%-44%) over Senator Clinton in support for the nomination among registered Democrats and Democratic leaners nationwide. Most national polling done prior to the March 4th primaries had shown Obama with a significant lead after a winning streak of 11 straight victories in primaries and caucuses. The basic structure of this race is much the same as it was a month ago. Obama is the change candidate and Clinton is the candidate who is seen as more experienced and tested. To view from this survey click here.

Economy Top Issue for Presidential Candidates to Discuss    Friday, March 07, 2008
A new survey reveals that economic worries have overcome health and Iraq as a campaign issue. Health care ranks third as the issue that people want presidential candidates to discuss during the campaign -- named by 28% of voters, behind the economy (45%) and Iraq (32%). Party differences exist, with health care ranking second for Democrats, third for independents, and fourth for Republicans. Overall, the share of registered voters picking the economy as the issue they want to hear the candidates talk about doubled since December. To view more from this survey, click here.

New York City Global Warming Survey    Tuesday, March 04, 2008
According to a new survey, a large majority of New York City residents say that they are personally convinced that global warming is happening (78%). Of those personally convinced, 82 percent believe that global warming is caused mainly by human activities (70%), or caused equally by humans and natural changes (12%), while only 15 percent believe it is caused mostly by natural changes in the environment. A majority of New Yorkers (60%) say they personally worry either a great deal (26%) or a fair amount (34%) about global warming, whereas 39 percent say they worry only a little (24%) or not at all (15%). Yet most New York City residents believe that global warming is a greater threat to species, people, and places relatively far away, than to themselves or other people in the city. To view more from this survey, click here.

Obama Leading    Thursday, February 28, 2008
According to a new survey, Barack Obama leads Hillary Clinton in the national Democratic primary contest as the March 4 primaries approach. He holds a 50%-43% lead over John McCain in a general election matchup. Yet, a solid majority of voters (56%) says Obama has not provided enough information about his plans and policies; in contrast, most voters say Clinton and McCain have disclosed enough information about their plans. In addition, 43% of voters say that Obama would not be "tough enough" in dealing with foreign policy and national security issues. To view more from this survey, click here.

Religious Affiliation in America Very Diverse    Monday, February 25, 2008
A new survey describes the religious affiliation of the American public and explores the shifts taking place in the U.S. religious landscape. The survey finds that religious affiliation in the U.S. is both very diverse and extremely fluid. More than one-quarter of American adults (28%) have left the faith in which they were raised in favor of another religion -- or no religion at all. If change in affiliation from one type of Protestantism to another is included, roughly 44% of adults have either switched religious affiliation, moved from being unaffiliated with any religion to being affiliated with a particular faith, or dropped any connection to a specific religious tradition altogether. To view more from this survey, click here.

Online Shopping    Wednesday, February 13, 2008
According to a new survey, most online Americans view online shopping as a way to save time and a convenient way to buy products. At the same time, most internet users express discomfort over a key step in online shopping -- sending personal or credit card information over the internet. To view more from this survey, click here.

Newsweek Poll: Post-Super Tuesday    Monday, February 11, 2008
After Super Tuesday, the NEWSWEEK poll shows Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton statistically tied for support among registered Democrats and Democratic leaners nationwide. Obama is the first choice of 42% of Democratic voters, while 41% prefer Hillary Clinton. A large number (17%) are undecided at this point. The co-frontrunners have different appeals: Obama is the choice of those looking for change and a more inspirational, unifying candidate; Clinton is the favorite of voters who see her as more experienced, a more effective leader, and someone who cares about their problems. On the Republican side, with Romney's withdrawal, John McCain is in a strong position to capture the nomination. There is less enthusiasm among GOP voters for McCain than there is among Democrats for Obama and Clinton. Nonetheless, three-quarters (76%) of all Republican voters and two-thirds (69%) of self-described conservatives say they are okay with McCain as the GOP nominee.

McCain's Support Soars, Democratic Race Tightens    Sunday, February 03, 2008
According to a new survey, Barack Obama and John McCain have made significant gains in support as the field of candidates has narrowed in both parties. John McCain now leads 42%-22% over Mitt Romney among Republican voters nationally. Support for McCain is up 13 points since mid-January, and he currently draws about twice as much support as either Romney or Mike Huckabee. To view more from this survey, click here.

The Impact Of "Cell-Onlys" On Public Opinion Polling    Thursday, January 31, 2008
According to two new surveys, the proportion of Americans who rely solely on a cell phone for their telephone service continues to grow, as does the share who still have a landline phone but do most of their calling on their cell phone. With these changes, there is an increased concern that polls conducted only on landline telephones may not accurately measure public opinion. A new Pew Research Center study finds that, while different demographically, Americans who mostly or exclusively rely on cell phones are not substantially different from the landline population in their basic political attitudes and preferences. To view more from this survey, click here.

COMMONWEALTH EDUCATION POLL 2007/2008    Tuesday, January 29, 2008
Approaching the one year anniversary of the tragic shootings at Virginia Tech, according to a new survey, Virginians are divided over whether any government or societal action can prevent similar shootings; 48% take the more optimistic view while 47% say that shootings like the one at Virginia Tech will happen again regardless of what action is taken by government and society. About seven in ten (69%) Virginians believe parents need to tell schools about any social and emotional problems their children are having in order to prevent school violence, while 18% say parents should be able to keep this information private. Further, 74% say parents should be required to provide schools with a childs history of social and emotional problems at enrollment. Two thirds of Virginians say this should be required for students entering college.

An Even More Partisan Agenda for 2008    Thursday, January 24, 2008
According to a new survey, with the economy slowing and the stock market reeling, there is greater agreement among Republicans and Democrats that strengthening the nation's economy should be a top priority for the president and Congress in the coming year. By contrast, partisan differences over the importance of other domestic issues such as dealing with global warming, helping the poor and providing health insurance to the uninsured have all increased substantially over the past year. As President Bush prepares for his final State of the Union address on Jan. 28, opinions about his administration's legacy, already fairly negative, have declined further. Fully 59% say the Bush administration's failures will outweigh its accomplishments, while just 28% believe the Bush administration will be remembered more for its accomplishments. A year ago, a smaller majority (53%) believed the administration's failures would be more enduring than its successes. To view more from this survey, click here.

In GOP Primaries: Three Victors, Three Constituencies    Wednesday, January 16, 2008
According to a new survey, the Republican nomination contest is being increasingly shaped by ideology and religion as it moves toward the Super Tuesday states on Feb. 5. John McCain has moved out to a solid lead nationally, increasing his support among Republican and GOP-leaning voters from 22% in late December to 29% currently. Mike Huckabee, at 20%, and Mitt Romney, with 17%, trail McCain. Rudy Giuliani is a distant fourth, polling just 13%. Giuliani's support has declined seven points since late December. To view more from this survey, click here.

Internet's Broader Role in Campaign 2008    Friday, January 11, 2008
According to a new survey, the internet is living up to its potential as a major source for news about the presidential campaign. Nearly a quarter of Americans (24%) say they regularly learn something about the campaign from the internet, almost double the percentage from a comparable point in the 2004 campaign (13%). Moreover, the internet has now become a leading source of campaign news for young people, and the role of social networking sites such as MySpace and Facebook is a notable part of the story. Fully 42% of those ages 18 to 29 say they regularly learn about the campaign from the internet, the highest percentage for any news source. In January 2004, just 20% of young people said they routinely got campaign news from the internet. To view more from this survey, click here.

Increased use of video-sharing sites    Wednesday, January 09, 2008
According to a new survey, 48% of internet users said they had ever visited a video-sharing site such as YouTube. A year ago, in December 2006, 33% of internet users said they had ever visited such sites. That represents growth of more than 45% year-to-year. 15% of respondents said they had used a video-sharing site "yesterday" -- the day before they were contacted for our survey. A year ago, 8% had visited such a site "yesterday." Thus, on an average day, the number of users of video sites nearly doubled from the end of 2006 to the end of 2007. To view more from this survey, click here.

McCain and Huckabee Catch Up to Giuliani Nationwide    Wednesday, January 02, 2008
On the eve of the Iowa caucuses, Rudy Giuliani's once solid lead in nationwide polling of Republican voters has vanished. The latest nationwide survey by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press finds about equal levels of support for John McCain (22%), Rudy Giuliani (20%), and Mike Huckabee (17%). To view more from this survey, click here.

Information Searches That Solve Problems    Sunday, December 30, 2007
According to a new survey, for help with a variety of common problems, more people turn to the internet than consult experts or family members to provide information and resources. Another key insight is that members of Gen Y are the leading users of libraries for help solving problems and in more general patronage. To view more from this survey, click here.

Kaiser Poll Finds Iraq and Health Care Remain Top Issues for Presidential Candidates to Discuss, Though the Economy and Immigration Are Up    Thursday, December 20, 2007
With the first presidential primaries quickly approaching, the December Kaiser Health Tracking Poll: Election 2008 finds that Iraq continues to top the list of issues the public wants to hear presidential candidates talk about, with more than a third (35 percent) naming the war as one of the top two issues in an open-ended question. Health care (30 percent) ranks second, followed by the economy (21 percent) and immigration (17 percent). To view more from this survey, click here.

Teens and Social Media    Wednesday, December 19, 2007
According to a new survey, content creation by teenagers continues to grow, with 64% of online teenagers ages 12 to 17 engaging in at least one type of content creation, up from 57% of online teens in 2004. Girls continue to dominate most elements of content creation. Some 35% of all teen girls blog, compared with 20% of online boys, and 54% of wired girls post photos online compared with 40% of online boys. Boys, however, do dominate one area - posting of video content online. Online teen boys are nearly twice as likely as online girls (19% vs. 10%) to have posted a video online somewhere where someone else could see it.To view more from this survey, click here.

Digital Footprints: Online identity management and search in the age of transparency    Sunday, December 16, 2007
According to a new survey, internet users are becoming more aware of their digital footprint; 47% have searched for information about themselves online, up from just 22% five years ago. However, few monitor their online presence with great regularity. Just 3% of self-searchers report that they make a regular habit of it and 74% have checked up on their digital footprints only once or twice. To view more from this survey, click here.

Newsweek Poll: Huckabee Surges, Obama Gains in Iowa    Friday, December 07, 2007
A Newsweek poll in Iowa shows Mike Huckabee is now the Republican frontrunner in Iowa. Mitt Romney is in second place, while support for Rudy Giuliani and Fred Thompson has dropped to single digits. Huckabee's ordained minister status seems to be doing more to help than hurt his prospects in Iowa. The same cannot be said of Mitt Romney's Mormon religion. Close to half of Iowa Republican voters think at least some of their fellow Republicans will not be willing to back Romney because he is a Mormon. To view more from this survey, click here.

Republicans in Iowa, New Hampshire and South Carolina    Tuesday, December 04, 2007
According to a new survey, Republican voter sentiment in Iowa, New Hampshire and South Carolina is highly fluid. Compared with Democratic voters, likely Republican voters in these three politically disparate states express less enthusiasm about their field of presidential candidates, and many Republicans voice only modest support for their choices. Mike Huckabee runs even with Mitt Romney in Iowa, but the former Massachusetts governor holds a wide lead over all of his rivals in neighboring New Hampshire. There is no frontrunner in South Carolina, where Rudy Giuliani and Fred Thompson have about as much support as Romney, closely followed by John McCain and Huckabee. To view more from this survey, click here.

Democrats in Iowa, New Hampshire & South Carolina     Monday, December 03, 2007
According to a new survey, Democrats enter the presidential primary campaign upbeat about their candidates and united in their views on major issues. Sen. Hillary Clinton is the clear frontrunner in New Hampshire and South Carolina, where she holds 19-point and 14-point leads, respectively. However in Iowa she is in a statistical tie with Barack Obama. Clinton has a clear advantage on the key issue of health care, and leads among Democratic women voters in all three states - where women constitute majorities of the likely caucus and primary electorates. Her lead is also particularly wide among older voters - voters over age 50 in all three states favor her over Obama by more than two-to-one. To view more from this survey, click here.

Journalists in Iraq    Wednesday, November 28, 2007
A new survey of journalists covering the war from Iraq reveals that after four years of war, the journalists reporting from Iraq give their coverage a mixed but generally positive assessment, but they believe they have done a better job of covering the American military and the insurgency than they have the lives of ordinary Iraqis. And they do not believe the coverage of Iraq over time has been too negative. If anything, many believe the situation over the course of the war has been worse than the American public has perceived. To view more from this survey conducted by PSRA for The Project for Excellence in Journalism, click here.

Optimism About Black Progress Declines    Tuesday, November 13, 2007
A new national poll finds that African Americans see a widening gulf between the values of middle class and poor blacks, and nearly four-in-ten say that because of the diversity within their community, blacks can no longer be thought of as a single race. Blacks are also less upbeat about the state of black progress now than at any time since 1983. Looking backward, just one-in-five blacks say things are better for blacks now than they were five years ago. Looking ahead, fewer than half of all blacks (44%) say they think life for blacks will get better in the future, down from the 57% who said so in a 1986 survey. To view more from this survey click here.

Clinton Favorite to Win the White House    Sunday, November 04, 2007
With the presidential election only a year away, the Newsweek poll shows Senator Hillary Clinton and the Democrats as the favorites to win the White House - if only by a small margin. Clinton gets 44% support from registered Democrats and leaners, followed by Barack Obama with 24% and John Edwards with 12%. Clinton appeals more to the core voters within her party. She is the first choice of 45% of self-identified Democrats, compared with 39% of Democratic leaners. Rudy Giuliani remains the frontrunner in the Republican race, but he too has failed to build any momentum since the summer. He leads the GOP field with 30% support among registered Republicans and leaners, the same support level he received in August. There is no clear second place Republican candidate. Fred Thompson gets 15%, John McCain 14%, and Mitt Romney 12%. To view more from this survey, click here.

Newsweek Poll: Election 2008 One Year Out    Saturday, November 03, 2007
With the presidential election only a year away, the Newsweek poll shows Senator Hillary Clinton and the Democrats as the favorites to win the White House. But Clinton's lead over the Democratic field for her party's nomination is not so wide at this point that she has a lock on the nomination. And a GOP frontrunner continues to give her a close race in a trial heat for the general election.

A Year Before the 2008 Election    Wednesday, October 31, 2007
A new national survey finds that while the 2008 presidential election is still a year away, most major national opinion trends favor the Democrats. Discontent with the state of the nation is noticeably greater than it was four years ago. President Bush's approval rating has fallen from 50% to 30% over this period. The public continues to express more confidence in the Democratic Party than in the Republican Party as being able to bring about needed change, to govern in an honest and ethical way and to manage the federal government. To view more from this survey, click here.

Real Estate Slump Felt in Wealthy Areas    Thursday, October 11, 2007
Americans are substantially less inclined than they were even a few months ago to say they expect home prices to increase over the next few years. A Pew Center Research poll shows that, overall, 53% of Americans think local housing prices will climb in the next few years, down from 62% in June, while the number expecting prices to fall has increased from 28% to 36%. People living in areas with the most expensive homes and middle-income Americans are particularly likely to say that future home prices will decline.

To learn more, click here.

Minnesota Poll: U.S. Senate race wild and wide open    Monday, October 01, 2007
According to a new poll of Minnesota adults, all three leading contenders in Minnesota's 2008 U.S. Senate race face obstacles in winning the favor of the public, suggesting a wide open, unpredictable contest in a campaign expected to attract intense national attention. To view more from this survey conducted by PSRAI for the Minneapolis Star Tribune click here.

Newsweek Poll: Iowa Caucuses    Saturday, September 29, 2007
A Newsweek poll in Iowa, measuring voter preferences prior to the January presidential caucuses, shows former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney as the top choice of one-quarter (24%) of likely GOP caucus goers, followed by Fred Thompson (16%), Rudy Giuliani (13%), and Mike Huckabee (12%). Romney also leads when GOP voters' second choice for the nomination is considered. He is the first or second choice of 45% of likely Republican caucus-goers, followed by Giuliani (34%) and Thompson (26%). The Democratic race is highly competitive, with Hillary Clinton not separating herself from the pack in Iowa. Among all Iowa Democratic voters she leads with 31% support over Barack Obama (25%) and John Edwards (21%). Among likely Democratic caucus-goers, however, Obama has a marginal lead with 28%, followed by Clinton at 24% and Edwards at 22%. Clinton has one clear advantage over her Democratic rivals - a majority (55%) of her support is strong, compared with less than half of Obama (41%) and Edwards (37%) support.

Clinton and Giuliani Linked with Strong Traits    Thursday, September 20, 2007
As many as 67% of Democratic and Democratic-leaning voters say Clinton is the Democratic candidate who first comes to mind when they hear the word tough and more than half (52%) associate Clinton with the word smart. No other candidate - Democrat or Republican - comes close to Clinton in being linked with each of these traits. GOP frontrunner Rudy Giuliani is the Republican candidate that GOP voters most closely associate with a number of positive personality traits, including energetic, compassionate and optimistic, as well as tough and smart. Roughly half (48%) say Giuliani is the candidate who first comes to mind when the word energetic is mentioned. To view more from this survey, click here.

Positive Reactions to Petraeus' Recommendations, But No Increase in War Support    Tuesday, September 18, 2007
Most Americans (57%) who heard at least something about General David Petraeus' report say they approve of his recommendations for troop withdrawals, which President Bush has endorsed. However, just 16% say Petraeus' statements have made them more optimistic about the war, while 67% say their views were unchanged by the general's report. The mostly stable opinions about the war and U.S. policies toward Iraq are consistent with this assessment. In the current survey, a 47% plurality says the United States will probably or definitely fail to achieve its goals in Iraq, which is largely unchanged from July (49%). To view more from this survey, click here.

The Political Fallout: Bush, Iraq, and the GOP    Saturday, September 15, 2007
In May 2007, Newsweek magazine reported that President George W. Bush's job approval rating had slipped to 28 percent, putting him below the 30 percent mark for the first time in the Newsweek poll. Within a matter of weeks, the results of other national media polls confirmed this finding. All presidents have ups and downs in popularity, but an approval rating below 30 percent is relatively uncommon. It has been fifteen years since a U.S. president was last held in such low esteem. To view more from this article, click here.

Fewer than a third of Americans know Supreme Court rulings are final    Thursday, September 13, 2007
Most Americans know little about the workings of the U.S. Supreme Court, including the fact that Supreme Court rulings are final, according to a national survey conducted for the University of Pennsylvania's Annenberg Public Policy Center.

The findings are being released today in advance of Constitution Day, Monday, September 17.

For other findings, click here.
To read the press release, click here.

Iraq and Health Care Remain Top Concerns    Thursday, August 30, 2007
A new poll in a tracking series finds that Iraq continues to be the biggest concern for the public, with 42% saying it is one of the most important problems for the government to address. Health care remains the second most mentioned issue, with 27% citing it as one of the most important problems for the government to address. The economy ranks third (16%) and immigration fourth (13%). To view the findings for this poll, conducted by PSRAI for The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, please click here.

The Impact of the Movie "Sicko"    Monday, August 27, 2007
A new poll gauges public opinion of Michael Moore's documentary "Sicko." The survey finds that just 4% of adults say they have watched it, but nearly half (46%) had seen the movie or heard or read something about it a little over a month after its national release. Among those familiar with "Sicko," 45% said they have had a discussion with friends, co-workers, and family about the U.S. health system as a result of the movie; 43% said they were more likely to think there is a need to reform the health system. About equal numbers believe the movie accurately represents problems in the U.S. health system versus overstating them. To view more findings for this poll, conducted by PSRAI for The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, please click here.

Newsweek Poll: Clinton v. Giuliani?    Friday, August 03, 2007
Hillary Clinton and Rudy Giuliani continue to be the frontrunners in their respective presidential races, according to the latest Newsweek poll. Clinton leads Barack Obama by a 44%-23% margin among registered Democrats and Democratic leaners, no significant change from the 43%-27% advantage she had in a June Newsweek poll. John Edwards is in third place in the Democratic race with 14% and no other candidate gets as much as 5% support. In the GOP race, Giuliani leads the field with 30% support among registered Republican and Republican leaners. Former Illinois Senator Fred Thompson, yet to formally enter the GOP race, is second with 22%, followed by the fading John McCain (13%) and Mitt Romney (10%).

A Rising Tide Lifts Mood in the Developing World    Tuesday, July 24, 2007
The Pew Global Attitudes Project's 47-nation survey finds that measures of personal and economic satisfaction remain modest in the developing world when compared with measures for advanced nations, but this gap has narrowed. This increasing contentment was found to be correlated with sizable increases in per capita gross domestic product that, in most cases, far outpaced the rate of growth prior to 2002.

To view more of this survey, click here.

Newsweek Poll: Muslims in America    Friday, July 20, 2007
Over a third (36%) of adult Americans claim to personally know a Muslim living in the United States, according to a Newsweek poll. Most people seem to recognize that Muslim Americans are mostly immigrants rather than U.S.-born persons who converted to Islam. The survey results paint a mixed picture of public acceptance of Muslims in mainstream America. On one hand, close to two-thirds (64%) of Americans say they would have no objection to a son or a daughter dating a Muslim. A substantial majority (69%) also think Muslim students should be allowed to wear their traditional headscarves to class. On the other hand, close to half (46%) of Americans say they believe this country allows too many immigrants to come here from Muslim countries and people are split down the middle on whether or not they would vote for a qualified Muslim for political office.

What Makes a Successful Marriage?    Wednesday, July 18, 2007
According to a Pew Research Center survey of American adults, "sharing household chores" now ranks third in importance on a list of nine items often associated with successful marriages - well ahead of such staples as adequate income, good housing, common interests and shared religious beliefs. Sixty-two percent of adults say sharing household chores is very important to marital success, with virtually no difference of opinion between men and women, older adults and younger adults, or married people and singles.

To view more from this survey, click here.

Newsweek Poll: Iraq "Surge" Strategy Considered a Failure    Friday, July 13, 2007
A new Newsweek poll shows only 27% of adult Americans approving of the way George W. Bush is handling the situation in Iraq, two points below the 29% Bush receives for his job performance overall. Public unhappiness with the Iraq war and the way it has been conducted has played a major role in Bush's declining approval ratings since his re-election in 2004. The Newsweek poll trendline shows that public approval of the President's handling of the Iraq situation has remained below 30% since January 2007 when his "surge" plan for increasing troop levels in Iraq was announced. The current poll finds widespread public displeasure with Bush's current Iraq strategy. Almost two-thirds (64%) of Americans say Bush's surge plan has been a failure, and less than a quarter (22%) say it has been successful.

Fewer Mothers Prefer Full-time Work: 1997 to 2007    Thursday, July 12, 2007
In the span of the past decade, full-time work outside the home has lost some of its appeal to mothers, according to a Pew Research Center survey. Among working mothers with minor children (ages 17 and under), just one-in-five (21%) say full-time work is the ideal situation for them, down from the 32% who said this back in 1997. Fully six-in-ten (up from 48% in 1997) of today's working mothers say part-time work would be their ideal, and another one-in-five (19%) say she would prefer not working at all outside the home. There's been a similar shift in preferences among at-home mothers with minor children.

For more findings, click here.

Newsweek Poll: Obama and Race in America    Friday, July 06, 2007
According to a Newsweek poll, large majorities of Americans say that they would vote for a woman or for an African-American candidate for president, continuing a decade-long trend. But far fewer think America is ready to elect an African-American or a woman for president. Although 92% of adults say they would vote for an African-American candidate, just 59 percent think the country is ready for an African-American president. And while 86% say they would vote for a woman for president, only 58 percent believe the country is ready for one. Two-thirds (66%) of registered voters say there is at least some chance they would vote for Barack Obama, with about as many (62%) saying the same about Hillary Clinton. However, in a head-to-head match up, Clinton leads Obama 56 to 33 percent.

Home Broadband Adoption 2007    Tuesday, July 03, 2007
After exhibiting relatively strong growth between early 2005 and early 2006, home broadband adoption in 2006-2007 grew at its slowest rate in recent years. As of March 2007, 47% of adult Americans say they have a high-speed connection at home, up from 42% in early 2006. This 12% year-to-year growth rate is much lower than the 40% rate in the previous period.

To find out more, click here.

Cyberbullying and Online Teens    Wednesday, June 27, 2007
About one third (32%) of all teenagers who use the internet say they have been targets of a range of annoying and potentially menacing online activities - such as receiving threatening messages; having their private emails or text messages forwarded without consent; having an embarrassing picture posted without permission; or having rumors about them spread online. Several patterns are clear: girls are more likely than boys to be targets; and teens who share their identities and thoughts online are more likely to be targets than are those who lead less active online lives.

To read more, click here.

Global Unease With Major World Powers    Wednesday, June 27, 2007
A 47-nation survey finds global public opinion increasingly wary of the world's dominant nations and disapproving of their leaders. Anti-Americanism is extensive, as it has been for the past five years. At the same time, the image of China has slipped significantly among the publics of other major nations. Opinion about Russia is mixed, but confidence in its president, Vladimir Putin, has declined sharply. In fact, the Russian leader's negatives have soared to the point that they mirror the nearly worldwide lack of confidence in George W. Bush.

To view more click here.

Insurance and a Medical Home Improves Health Care for Minorities    Wednesday, June 27, 2007
A study conducted by The Commonwealth Fund found that providing minority patients a "medical home" in which they have a regular doctor or health professional who oversees and coordinates their care would help eliminate racial and ethnic health disparities and promote more health care equity. The 2006 survey of more than 2,830 adults found that linking minority patients with a health care setting that offers timely, well-organized care where they can routinely seek physicians and medical advice can help them better manage chronic conditions and obtain critical preventive care services.

To view more, click here.

Newsweek Poll: What You Need to Know    Sunday, June 24, 2007
The latest Newsweek poll quizzed the public on a variety of topics, ranging from politics and government to foreign affairs, business and technology and pop culture. The results show many gaps in people's knowledge, such as continuing misperceptions about Iraq's role in the 9/11 terrorist attacks and a very sketchy knowledge about other countries.

Newsweek Poll: Bloomberg for President?    Friday, June 22, 2007
How would New York City Michael Bloomberg impact the presidential race if he runs as an independent candidate for president? The latest Newsweek poll finds that many voters are critical of the two major parties and are open to alternatives, but Michael Bloomberg is not well positioned to take advantage of this situation - at least until he becomes better known. At the national level, two-thirds (68%) of registered voters say they know little or nothing about Bloomberg. When asked if they think the popular New York City mayor would make a good president, voters who have an opinion are about evenly divided - 29% see him as fit for the office but 30% take the opposite view.

Newsweek Poll: New Low for President Bush    Thursday, June 21, 2007
George W. Bush's overall approval rating has slipped further in the latest Newsweek poll. Currently only 26% of adults approve of his job performance, down a statistically insignificant two points from 28% in early May. The President's new low in approval puts him below Jimmy Carter's lowest rating on record in the Gallup poll (28% in 1979). The new poll also shows the President with his lowest rating on record for his handling of the situation in Iraq (23%). However, public dissatisfaction with Washington is not limited to the Bush Administration. Congress also takes its share of heat. Overall only 25% of Americans say they approve of the job Congress is doing, while 63% disapprove.

Iraq, Health Care, and Immigration Top Concerns    Wednesday, June 20, 2007
The second poll in a tracking series finds that Iraq continues to be the biggest concern for the public, with 43% saying it is one of the most important problems for the government to address. Health care follows with 28% citing it as one of the most important problems for the government to address. Gas prices (12%) and immigration (12%) emerge as greater concerns than in the first poll.

To view the findings for this poll, conducted by PSRAI for The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, please click here.

Parents, Children & Media: A Kaiser Family Foundation Survey    Tuesday, June 19, 2007
Parents say they are gaining control of their children's exposure to sex and violence in the media, according to a national survey of parents by the Kaiser Family Foundation. Sixty-five percent of parents say they 'closely' monitor their children's media use, while just 18% say they 'should do more.' This may help to explain why since 1998 the proportion of parents who say they are 'very' concerned that their own children are exposed to inappropriate content - while still high - has dropped, from 67% to 51% for sexual content, from 62% to 46% for violence, and from 59% to 41% for adult language.

For more findings, click here.

Mixed Views on Immigration Bill    Thursday, June 07, 2007
The public is ambivalent about the immigration bill being debated by the Senate, according to a national poll by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press. Just a third of those who have heard something about the bill favor it, while 41% are opposed, and a relatively large minority (26%) offers no opinion. Yet one of the bill's primary goals - to provide a way for people who are in this country illegally to gain legal citizenship under certain conditions - wins broad and bipartisan support. Overall, 63% of the public - and nearly identical numbers of Republicans, Democrats and independents - favor such an approach if illegal immigrants pass background checks, pay fines and have jobs.

To read on, click here.

Thompson Demonstrates Broad Potential Appeal    Monday, June 04, 2007
Former Sen. Fred Thompson has broad potential appeal among Republican voters even before his expected entrance into the presidential race. Thompson is not nearly as well known as other leading GOP candidates, but 37% of the Republican and Republican-leaning voters who have heard of Thompson say there is a "good chance" they will support him, according to a national survey by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press.

For more findings, click here.

Spam 2007    Wednesday, May 23, 2007
Spam continues to plague the internet, according to a survey conducted by the Pew Internet & American Life project. More Americans than ever say they are getting more spam than in the past. But while American internet users report increasing volumes of spam, they also indicate that they are less bothered by it than before.

For more details, click here.

A Typology of Information and Communication Technology Users    Sunday, May 06, 2007
Fully 85% of American adults use the internet or cell phones - and most use both. Yet half of adults have a distant or non-existent relationship to modern information technology, according to the Pew Internet & American Life Project's typology of information and communication technology users. Some of this diffidence is driven by concerns about information overload; some is related to a sense that gadgets have more capacity than users can master; some is connected to a lack of personal interest in activities like blogging; and some is rooted in an inability to afford or unwillingness to buy the gear associated with the digital age.

To read on, click here.

Newsweek Poll: Political Courage    Saturday, May 05, 2007
After his veto of an Iraq war funding bill with a timetable for withdrawal, George W. Bush's approval rating has slipped to 28% in the latest Newsweek poll, the lowest rating on record in the Newsweek poll. When Americans think about presidential courage - doing the right thing despite the political risks - they most often see it exemplified by Ronald Reagan (18%), Bill Clinton (18%), and John F. Kennedy (14%). Just 4% name George W. Bush as the U.S. president who has displayed the greatest political courage, and over half (55%) don't see Bush as politically courageous.

Both Sides Reject Compromise in Iraq Funding Fight    Thursday, April 26, 2007
With battle lines drawn over legislation funding the Iraq war, the public is showing little appetite for compromise, according to a national survey by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press. Overall, a solid majority of Americans (59%) continue to say they want their representative to support a bill calling for a U.S. troop withdrawal from Iraq by August 2008, while just a third want their representative to vote against such legislation. Most supporters (54%) of a timeline for withdrawing U.S. forces from Iraq say they want Democratic leaders to insist on that position rather than work toward an agreement with President Bush. An identical percentage of opponents of a timetable (54%) want Bush to hold to his threat to veto legislation that includes a withdrawal timeline, rather than seeking compromise with the Democrats.

For more findings, click here.

Online Activities and Pursuits: Wikipedia Users    Tuesday, April 24, 2007
More than a third of American adult internet users (36%) consult the citizen-generated online encyclopedia Wikipedia, according to a nationwide survey by the Pew Internet & American Life Project. And on a typical day in the winter of 2007, 8% of online Americans consulted Wikipedia. Despite ongoing controversy about the reliability of articles on Wikipedia, the site is far more popular among the well-educated than it is among those with lower levels of education. For instance, 50% of those with at least a college degree consult the site, compared with 22% of those with a high school diploma .

To learn more, click here.

Little Boost for Gun Control or Agreement on Causes of the Va. Tech Shootings    Monday, April 23, 2007
Last week's shootings at Virginia Tech have had little immediate impact on public opinion about gun control, according to a nationally representative telephone survey by the Pew Research Center for the People and the Press. Six-in-ten Americans say it is more important to control gun ownership, while 32% say it is more important to protect the right of Americans to own guns. These numbers have changed little since 2004. At the same time, a 55% majority now opposes a ban on the sale of handguns, while just 37% favor such a ban. There was greater support for gun control in 2000, when the public was evenly split over a handgun ban (47% favor/47% opposed).

For more findings, click here.

Only A Minority of Americans Keep Close Track of Their Spending    Thursday, April 19, 2007
Financial experts generally agree that having a household budget is sound financial management. But only a minority of Americans keep close track of what they spend on typically monthly expenses. And although a majority of the public has at least a somewhat good idea of where their money goes each month, more than two in 10 keep little or no track at all. To view more from this survey, click here.

Teens, Privacy and Online Social Networks    Wednesday, April 18, 2007
According to a survey by the Pew Internet & American Life Project, the majority of teens actively manage their online profiles to keep the information they believe is most sensitive, such as their full name and phone number, away from the unwanted gaze of strangers, parents and other adults. At the same time, nearly two-thirds of teens with profiles (63%) believe that a motivated person could eventually identify them from the information they publicly provide on their profiles.

To learn more, click here.

Newsweek Poll: Religious Beliefs    Saturday, March 31, 2007
The Newsweek poll finds that belief in God and identification with a religion are very widespread in this country. Nine in 10 (91%) U.S. adults say they believe in God. Eighty-seven percent of Americans identify with a religion: 82% of adults call themselves Christians, and another 5% say they follow a non-Christian faith. Overall, the new poll finds one in 10 adults identify as having no religion, and 6% saying they do not believe in God. Just 3% of the public self-identifies as atheist. Close to half (47%) of Americans believe the country is more accepting of atheists today than it had been in the past, while only about one in 10 (9%) thinks atheists are less accepted today. Still, declaring oneself an atheist is clearly not the road to electoral success. Six in 10 (62%) registered voters say they would not vote for a political candidate who was an atheist.

Iraq and Health Care Top American's List of Concerns    Thursday, March 29, 2007
A new poll shows that Iraq continues to top the public's list of issues. Forty-four percent of adults say it is one of the most important problems for the government to address and the same share say they would like to hear presidential candidates talk about it. Health care ranks second, with 29% citing it as one of the most important problems for the government to address, followed by the economy at 13%.

To view the findings for this poll, conducted by PSRAI for The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, please click here.

Solid Majority Favors Congressional Troop Deadline    Monday, March 26, 2007
A nationwide survey by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press finds that a solid majority of Americans (59%) say they want their congressional representative to support a bill calling for a withdrawal of U.S. forces from Iraq by August 2008. Regarding the impact of President Bush's troop surge, 27% of Americans say that the troop increase is currently making things better in Iraq, though somewhat more (36%) think the surge will make things better in the long run. Opinions about the troop increase and a congressional troop deadline - like nearly all other issues relating to the war in Iraq - are deeply divided along partisan lines.

For more findings, click here.

Trends in Political Values and Core Attitudes: 1987-2007    Thursday, March 22, 2007
A survey conducted by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press explores trends in the social, political and economic values of the American public over the past ten years. Among the more dramatic findings is a shift in party identification since 2002, when 43% of Americans identified with the Republican Party or leaned to the GOP, while an identical proportion said they were Democrats. Today, half of the public (50%) either identifies as a Democrat or says they lean to the Democratic Party, compared with 35% who align with the GOP.

To read more, click here.

Newsweek Poll: Gonzales Has Weak Support    Saturday, March 17, 2007
Public opinion is divided on whether Attorney General Alberto Gonzalez should resign after reports of the possible White House involvement in the firings of eight federal prosecutors last year, according to a new Newsweek poll. While roughly a third (35%) of Americans want Gonzalez to step down, a similar number want him to stay on (32%), and another third (33%) are undecided. This poll also asked how the issue of marriage and divorce might affect the 2008 presidential race. The poll finds that Americans generally and Evangelical Republicans specifically take a decidedly realistic and nuanced view of marriage and divorce. People are willing to give divorced candidates quite a bit of leeway, but many admit that a candidate's current and past marital relationships do influence their chances of winning their support.

Aging in Asia and Oceania    Wednesday, March 14, 2007
A 2006 AARP survey of opinion leaders in the United States and in seven countries in Asia and Oceania shows that Asian leaders feel ill prepared to deal with the challenges of an aging population. The study examines issues such as the perceived importance of population aging, the types of challenges and opportunities societies are expected to face because of population aging, the degree to which different sectors of society are prepared for the changing demographics, the different ways in which societies address retirement security and quality of life issues in old age, and attitudes toward older people and their place in society. .

To view the complete report, click here.

Newsweek Poll: Giuliani and the GOP    Saturday, March 03, 2007
Former New York City mayor Rudy Giuliani has moved ahead of Arizona Senator John McCain in the race for the Republican Party's presidential nomination, according to the latest Newsweek poll. In a head-to-head contest among registered Republicans and Republican leaners, Giuliani tops McCain by a whopping 59%-34% margin. In a late January poll, Giuliani's lead over McCain in the Newsweek poll was a statistically insignificant four points (48%/44%). Giuliani shows the potential to run strongly among Independents and attract a fair share of Democratic votes as the GOP presidential standard-bearer. When matched against Democratic frontrunner Hillary Clinton in a general election trial heat, Giuliani edges Clinton by one point (47%/46%), taking the Independent vote by a 49%-42% margin. Giuliani's moderate to liberal positions on social issues help him attract support from Democrats and Independents, but might cost him votes in GOP primaries, where voters tend to be more socially conservative.

Pennsylvanians Express High Levels of Confidence in State Elected Officials    Tuesday, February 27, 2007
According to an IssuesPA/Pew Benchmark and Legislator Survey, the public mood among Pennsylvanians is upbeat with regard to state elected officials and the direction of the state. Seventy-two percent of residents say they have a lot or some confidence in Governor Edward G. Rendell, and two-thirds (66 percent) of Pennsylvanians polled have a lot or some confidence in the legislature as a whole. This is up from 48 percent in November 2005 and may be a result of the election that swept in many new legislators who ran on a reform agenda.

For detailed findings, click here.

Internet Evolution: Wireless Internet Access    Sunday, February 25, 2007
Some 34% of internet users have logged onto the internet using a wireless connection either around the house, at their workplace, or some place else, according to a national survey by the Pew Internet & American Life Project. In other words, one-third of internet users, either with a laptop computer, a handheld personal digital assistant (PDA), or cell phone, have surfed the internet or checked email using means such as WiFi broadband or cell phone networks. Survey findings suggest that the "relentless connectivity" of wireless access lends a unique quality to the online behavior of those who use it.

For more details, click here.

Voters Remain in Neutral as Presidential Campaign Moves into High Gear    Friday, February 23, 2007
A national survey by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press revealed that despite the early kickoff of the 2008 presidential campaign and the large number of candidates, much of the American public has taken little notice of the campaign. Americans are no more likely to say they have given the presidential campaign much thought than they did in December, and just small minorities can name a candidate they might support. The results of in-depth questions suggest that the images of even the well-known candidates are fairly thin.

Despite low interest in and knowledge of candidates, certain candidate traits and experiences, both positive and negative, have registered with the public and point both to challenges and opportunities for the leading contenders.

To read more, click here.

Americans and Social Trust: Who, Where, and Why    Thursday, February 22, 2007
Social trust is a belief in the honesty, integrity and reliability of others - a "faith in people." A nationally representative Pew Social Trends telephone survey asked 2,000 Americans three questions designed to measure social trust. Americans are closely divided in terms of their level of social trust; public opinion was split over the following question: "Generally speaking, would you say that most people can be trusted or that you can't be too careful in dealing with people?" Some 45% of respondents say the former, while 50% say the latter.

The survey results identified several demographic traits that are correlated with social trust, including race, income, marital status, age, and community type. For analyses of these demographic differences in social trust, read the full report here.

War Support Slips, Fewer Expect a Successful Outcome    Thursday, February 15, 2007
A nationwide survey by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press reveals increasingly negative public perceptions of the war in Iraq. Fully two-thirds of Americans (67%) say things are not going well with the U.S. military effort in Iraq. Additionally, confidence in a successful outcome in Iraq, which remained fairly high last year even as perceptions of the situation grew negative, has eroded. The public is now evenly divided over whether the U.S. is likely to achieve its goals in Iraq - 47% believe it will definitely or probably succeed, while 46% disagree. Three months ago, 53% saw success as at least probable and 41% disagreed.

For more findings, click here.

Online Activities and Pursuits: Tagging    Wednesday, January 31, 2007
The Pew Internet & American Life Project's first-ever survey data on the topic of tagging reveal that 28% of online Americans have tagged or organized online content such as photos, news stories or blog posts. On a typical day, 7% of internet users say they tag online content. Tagging, a revolutionary way to organize and categorize digital material, enables internet users to personalize the way they mark, store and retrieve web content.

To learn more, click here.

Newsweek Poll: Bush and 2008    Saturday, January 27, 2007
After his televised State of the Union address, there are no signs that George W. Bush has improved his standing with the public. In fact, the latest Newsweek poll, conducted in the days immediately following the speech, shows Bush's overall approval rating at 30%. That's the lowest approval figure for this president in the Newsweek poll so far. The unpopularity of George W. Bush and his policies seems to be having a negative impact on the GOP's prospects for retaining the White House in 2008. Registered voters nationwide now say they would prefer to see a Democrat elected in 2008 over a Republican by a lopsided margin of 49% to 28%.

Broad Support for Political Compromise in Washington    Monday, January 22, 2007
A large majority of the American public expresses a strong desire for political compromise. Fully three-quarters say they like political leaders who are willing to compromise, and roughly twice as many Americans (60% to 34%) like as dislike leaders who take a mix of conservative and liberal positions. At the same time, most Americans feels that the country is more polarized than in the past, and only about a quarter (28%) believes that relations between the two political parties will improve over the next year.

To find out more, click here.

Newsweek Poll: Bush's Iraq Plan    Saturday, January 20, 2007
After formally announcing his plan for additional troops in Iraq, George W. Bush's approval rating stands at 31% in the latest Newsweek poll, matching his previous low. In contrast, the poll shows opinion of the new Democratic-controlled Congress to be generally positive, at least among those who are paying attention. The poll also shows the President receiving his lowest ratings so far for his handling of the situation in Iraq (24%) and terrorism (41%). In fact, for the first time in the Newsweek poll, over half (53%) the public disapproves of the way Bush is handling terrorism.

Broad Opposition to Bush's Iraq Plan    Tuesday, January 16, 2007
The American public expressed widespread disapproval of President Bush's plan to send roughly 21,000 additional troops to Iraq, according to a Pew Research Center national survey. Opinion of Bush's initiative is split sharply along party lines, with 60% of Republicans and only 12% of Democrats favoring the plan.

To view more findings, click here.

Social Networking Websites and Teens: An Overview    Sunday, January 07, 2007
A social networking site is an online place where a user can create a profile and build a personal network that connects him or her to other users. In the past five years, such sites have rocketed from a niche activity into a phenomenon that engages tens of millions of internet users. More than half (55%) of all online American youths ages 12-17 use online social networking sites, according to a new national survey of teenagers conducted by the Pew Internet & American Life Project.

To learn more, click here

Americans Fairly Upbeat about Family Finances in 2007    Thursday, January 04, 2007
According to a survey, 57% of Americans are expecting some improvement in their financial situation in the coming year, and another 10% are expecting a lot of improvement.

To view more from the survey, click here.

Americans Divided Over Impact of Free Trade Agreements    Tuesday, December 19, 2006
The American public continues to have a mixed opinion about free trade agreements such as NAFTA and the WTO. On balance they are seen as a good thing for the country, but Americans are divided over the impact of free trade agreements on their own personal financial situations. About as many people think they are helped by them (35%) as believe they are hurt (36%).

To view more from this poll, click here.

Newsweek Poll: Hillary and Obama    Sunday, December 17, 2006
Gauging the prospects of Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama as presidential candidates, a Newsweek poll shows Clinton is preferred as the Democratic Party's 2008 presidential nominee by a 50%-32% margin among registered Democrats and Democratic leaners. Poll analysis suggests that Hillary Clinton's frontrunner status depends strongly on her name recognition advantage. But Obama is likely to be helped by voters' desire for a fresh face and rise in the polls as more get to know him. Both Democrats who are the early frontrunners would have to break precedent to go on to capture the White House in 2008. According to the poll, 86 percent of registered voters would vote for a qualified woman candidate for president if their party nominated one, and 93 percent say the same for a qualified African-American.

Luxury or Necessity?    Thursday, December 14, 2006
The number of things Americans say they can't live without has multiplied in the past decade, according to a survey that asks whether a broad array of everyday consumer products are luxuries or necessities.

To view more, click here.

Modest Public Interest of Baker-Hamilton Report    Tuesday, December 12, 2006
Despite deep public dissatisfaction with the Iraq war, the highly anticipated report by a bipartisan panel proposing policy options for Iraq did not register strongly with most Americans. Only about half say they heard even a little about the report released last week by the Iraq Study Group led by James Baker and Lee Hamilton, while nearly as many (47%) say they heard nothing at all about the group's recommendations.

Click here to view more findings.

Newsweek Poll: The Iraq Study Group    Saturday, December 09, 2006
According to a Newsweek poll, the public seems weary of the Iraq war and prepared to support anything that stabilizes Iraq and paves the way for a withdrawal of U.S. forces. Before being told about any of the Iraq Study group's specific recommendations, Americans polled said they generally agreed with the group's recommendations for changing policy in Iraq by a two-to-one margin (39% vs. 20% disagree). On the specifics, majority support is found for withholding support if the Iraqi government fails to meet certain benchmarks (65%), making a renewed and sustained effort to end the Israeli-Palestinian conflict (61%), and reaching out to Iraq and Syria for help (57%).

Online Activities and Pursuits: Podcast Downloading    Wednesday, November 22, 2006
According to a Pew Internet Project poll conducted in August of 2006, some 12% of internet users say they have downloaded a podcast so they can listen to it or view it at a later time. This finding compares to the 7% of internet users who reported podcast downloading in a survey conducted just a few months earlier in 2006, from February to April.

To find out more, click here.

Americans' Plans for Holiday Shopping    Monday, November 20, 2006
For most Americans, the heart of the holiday shopping season still lies ahead. According to a Pew Social Trends survey, fewer than 3 in 10 (27%) adults have started their holiday shopping. Once they start flooding the stores, more than half of all adults (56%) say they'll be working within a holiday shopping budget.

To view more from this survey, click here.

The Internet as a Resource for News and Information about Science    Monday, November 20, 2006
According to a poll by the Pew Internet Project, fully 87% of online users have at one time used the internet to carry out research on a scientific topic or concept and 40 million adults use the internet as their primary source of news and information about science.

To learn more, click here

Public Cheers Democratic Victory    Thursday, November 16, 2006
The Democrats' big win on Nov. 7 has gotten a highly favorable response from the public. Initial reactions to the Democratic victory are as positive as they were to the GOP's electoral sweep of Congress twelve years ago. Six-in-ten Americans say they are happy that the Democratic Party won control of Congress; in December 1994, roughly the same percentage (57%) expressed a positive opinion of the GOP's takeover.

To view more findings, click here.

ADB Deemed Effective, But Could Do Better, Survey Finds    Tuesday, November 14, 2006
The Asian Development Bank is viewed as effective and largely successful in its work, but there is room for improvement, according to the first ever independent ADB perceptions survey, conducted of more than 700 opinion leaders in 30 member countries. The survey found that the Manila-based multilateral development bank is acknowledged for its contribution to the development progress of the Asia and Pacific region. Many opinion leaders interviewed noted ADB's operational excellence particularly in infrastructure and regional cooperation and integration initiatives.

To view more of the findings, click here.

Newsweek Poll: Post-Election 2006    Saturday, November 11, 2006
After the Democratic takeover of Congress in Tuesday's elections, a Newsweek Poll shows President Bush's approval ratings falling to a new low. Just 31% of Americans now say they approve of the way George W. Bush is handling his job, while 63% disapprove. A Newsweek poll conducted in the final days of the midterm election campaign showed Bush's ratings at 35% approve/56% disapprove. The President is now more widely seen as a lame duck than he was before the election. Two-thirds (66%) of the public thinks Bush won't be able to get much done for the remainder of his second term, up from 56% in a mid-October poll.

Online Health Search 2006    Sunday, October 29, 2006
According to a survey by the Pew Internet Project, most internet users start at a search engine when looking for health information online. Very few check the source and date of the information they find.

To view more findings from this survey, click here.

Newsweek Poll: Controversial Political Ads    Saturday, October 28, 2006
With the battle for control of Congress moving toward the final week, a Newsweek poll shows some evidence of gains for George W. Bush and the Republicans. Bush approval is up a few points (37% vs. 35% last week and 33% three weeks ago), a larger number of Americans now say they are satisfied with the direction of the country (31% vs. 25% last week), and public opinion about the situation in Iraq is not quite as negative as it has been. The poll also asks a series of questions about recent ads for Republican and Democratic candidates running for the U.S. House and Senate; majorities of voters have seen these ads. Those aware of these ads are quite critical of them. Ads for Republican and Democratic candidates are about equally likely to be seen as too negative (63% and 61%, respectively) and misleading or distorted (65% and 63%). Less than a third (28%) of aware voters see the GOP ads and a third (32%) of aware voters see the Democratic ads as providing useful information.

Democrats Hold Lead in Competitive Districts    Thursday, October 26, 2006
With less than two weeks to go before the midterm elections, the Democrats not only continue to maintain a double-digit advantage nationally, but also lead by the same margin in the competitive districts that will determine which party controls the House of Representatives. Nationally, the Democrats hold a 49%-38% lead among registered voters, and a nearly identical 50%-39% lead among those voters most likely to cast ballots on Nov. 7.

To view the findings click here.

Health Care and the 2006 Elections    Monday, October 23, 2006
According to a poll, voters are increasingly worried about the rising costs of health care at a personal level, but the issue has not broken through as a voting priority in the upcoming Congressional elections.

To view the findings for this poll, conducted by PSRAI for The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, please click here.

Newsweek Poll: Priorities for a Democratic Congress    Saturday, October 21, 2006
As Election Day draws near and voters begin to focus more on the race for Congress, a Newsweek poll shows the Democrats maintaining their double-digit lead over the Republicans in the generic trial heat. Overall, 51% of registered voters say they would vote for the Democratic candidate in their Congressional district if the election were held today, while 37% would vote for the Republican. In six Newsweek polls conducted over the course of 2006, the size of the Democratic lead has been remarkably consistent, ranging from 11 to 14 points.

Election Turnout May Be Higher Than Normal    Wednesday, October 11, 2006
Turnout in the 2006 midterm election may well be higher than normal, given the level of interest expressed by voters. In a poll conducted between September 21 and October 4, 2006, 51% of voters say they have given a lot of thought to this November's election, up from 45% at this point in 2002 and 42% in early October of 1998. Even in 1994 - a recent high in midterm election turnout - just 44% of voters had thought a lot about the election in early October.

To view the findings, click here.

Newsweek Poll: The Foley Fiasco    Saturday, October 07, 2006
The image of the Republican Party has suffered some fallout in the aftermath of the Mark Foley scandal, according to a Newsweek Poll. When presented with a list of eight key issues - including such issues as terrorism, immigration, and moral values where the GOP has typically had an edge - the public now trusts the Democrats more to handle every issue on the list. President Bush's approval rating is at a record low (33% approve/59% disapprove), and only 25% of Americans say they are satisfied with the direction of the country.

By a margin of 52% to 24%, the public is inclined to believe that House Speaker Dennis Hastert was aware of Foley's inappropriate conduct involving sexually graphic emails and tried to cover it up. However, the public is closely divided (43% yes vs. 36% no) on whether Hastert should have to step down as House Speaker due to the way he has handled this matter. The poll suggests the Democrats need to be careful in their response to the Foley scandal. Asked if the Democrats were going too far in trying to use the Foley matter for partisan advantage, 37% say they are, 43% say they are not, and 20% are not sure.

Iraq Central Issue of Midterm Elections    Thursday, October 05, 2006
A survey shows there is more dismay about how the U.S. military effort in Iraq is going than at any point since the war began more than three years ago. And the war is the dominant concern among the majority of voters who say they will be thinking about national issues, rather than local issues, when they cast their ballot for Congress this fall.

To view the results from this survey click here.

Spirit and Power: A 10-Country Survey of Pentecostals    Thursday, October 05, 2006
By all accounts, Pentecostalism and related charismatic movements represent one of the fastest-growing segments of global Christianity. According to the World Christian Database, at least a quarter of the world's 2 billion Christians are thought to be members of these lively, highly personal faiths, which emphasize such spiritually renewing "gifts of the Holy Spirit" as speaking in tongues, divine healing and prophesying. .

To view more of this survey, click here.

Americans Trust Courts but also Believe them Biased, Surveys Find    Thursday, September 28, 2006
Many Americans Lack Basic Understanding of the Judiciary

Americans consistently rank the Supreme Court as the most trusted branch of government and hold a similar level of trust in state courts. But many also believe that the nation's courts favor the wealthy and politically connected, that judges are motivated by political and personal biases, and are influenced by campaign fundraising.

To read the full release, click here.

To read a survey summary, click here.

Internet Revolution: The future of the Internet II    Sunday, September 24, 2006
A survey of technology thinkers and stakeholders shows they believe the internet will continue to spread in a "flattening" and improving world. There are many, though, who think major problems will accompany technology advances by 2020.

To read the full report, click here.

Publics of Asian Powers Hold Negative Views of One Another    Thursday, September 21, 2006
There is a good deal of dislike, if not outright hostility, in how the publics of major Asian countries view their neighbors. The deepest divides exist between traditional rivals - roughly seven-in-ten Japanese express an unfavorable view of China and an equal number of Chinese dislike Japan. Similarly, most Indians have an unfavorable view of Pakistan and most Pakistanis hold negative views about India. But there are other divisions as well. Both the Chinese and Japanese express generally unfavorable views of Pakistan, while the Chinese tend to feel negatively toward India as well.

To view more, click here.

E-Gov & E-Policy    Wednesday, September 20, 2006
26 million Americans were logging onto for news or information about the campaign on a typical day in August, the highest such figure recorded by the Pew Internet Project.

On a typical day in August, 26 million Americans were using the internet for news or information about politics and the upcoming mid-term elections. That corresponds to 19% of adult internet users, or 13% of all Americans over the age of 18.

To read the full report, click here.

Constitution Day: For Many Americans, It's Time for the Basics    Thursday, September 14, 2006
In observance of Constitution Day this year, millions of American students will interrupt their regular studies to learn more about the most important document in U.S. history.

Millions of American adults should be sitting right alongside them.

To view the press release, click here.

Crime and Punishment: Public Attitudes Toward Sentencing    Thursday, September 14, 2006
The climate of public opinion toward crime and punishment in this country has changed considerably over the past decade. As the national crime rate has declined, crime is less likely to be in the forefront of people's minds. A frequent polling topic 10 years ago, surveys about crime get much less attention today. A survey conducted by PSRAI for the National Center for State Courts (NCSC) examines the American public's views toward sentencing and related issues in an objective manner.

To read the executive summary, click here.
To read the full report, click here.

Strong Anti-Incumbent, Anti-Bush Sentiment    Thursday, September 14, 2006
As the congressional midterm campaign begins in earnest, voters are disappointed with Congress and disapproving of President Bush. Anti-incumbent sentiment, while a bit lower than a few months ago, is far more extensive than in the previous two midterms and remains close to 1994 levels. Many more voters see their vote as being against the president than at a comparable point in 1994, and a solid majority says party control of Congress will be a factor in their voting decision.

To view the results from this survey click here.

Pharmacists and Physicians See Real Benefits from Medicare Drug Law, But Most Think It Is Too Complicated     Thursday, September 07, 2006
Majorities of pharmacists (86%) and physicians (71%) believe the prescription drug law is helping people on Medicare save money on their medications. At the same time, pharmacists (91%) and doctors (92%) believe the law is too complicated. A majority in both professions say that Medicare beneficiaries who they see are encountering problems in getting their medications, sometimes with serious consequences.

To view the findings from two national surveys conducted by PSRAI for The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, click here.

Diminished Public Appetite for Military Force and Mideast Oil    Wednesday, September 06, 2006
Five years later, Americans' views of the impact of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks have changed little, but opinions about how best to protect against future attacks have shifted substantially. In particular, far more Americans say reducing America's overseas military presence, rather than expanding it, will have a greater effect in reducing the threat of terrorism.

To view the results from this survey click here.

Only 53%-58% of Americans Say President Must Follow a Supreme Court Ruling    Thursday, August 31, 2006
Only 53%-58% of Americans say the president must follow a Supreme Court ruling, and a large minority (38%) says the president can ignore the Supreme Court under some conditions, according to a survey conducted by the Annenberg Public Policy Center. The survey also shows that fully three-fourths reject presidential signing statements as a replacement for veto.

To read the full release, click here.

American Work Life is Worsening, But Most Workers Still Content    Wednesday, August 30, 2006
Americans believe that workers in this country are worse off now than a generation ago - toiling longer and harder for less in wages and benefits, for employers who aren't as loyal as they once were, in jobs that aren't as secure, and in a global economy that might very well send their work overseas.

Yet the public has generally taken in stride this perceived fraying of the social safety net at work, according to a Pew Research Center nationwide survey. Most people still have positive feelings about their own jobs, and even though many are troubled by the way the forces of modernization and globalization are affecting the American workplace, the level of public concern today is not substantially greater than it had been a decade or two ago.

To read the full report, click here.

Newsweek Poll: Split Remains    Saturday, August 26, 2006
A possibly revolutionary innovation in stem-cell research hasn't changed American opinions on the topic. Meanwhile, Bush's approval rating dips to 36 percent.

The announcement this week sounded momentous. Scientists said they had developed a new method of generating stem cells that, unlike previous techniques, wouldn't destroy human embryos. If the innovation stands up to scrutiny, it could eliminate the main rationale for objecting to such research. So in the wake of the news, you might think public opinion on the issue would shift. Not so. According to the Newsweek Poll, 48 percent of respondents favor federal funding for embryonic stem-cell research, while 40 percent oppose it. That's little different from the results of an October 2004 poll, taken in the heat of a presidential campaign, which found that 50 percent of registered voters favored the research and 36 percent opposed it.

Newsweek Poll: The Ripple Effect    Saturday, August 12, 2006
The foiled airline plot boosts President Bush's terror ratings, but this Newsweek Poll finds a lot for Democrats to cheer as the midterm elections approach.

Even after British officials revealed a terrorist plot to blow up as many as 10 jetliners traveling from the U.K. to the United States, using ordinary-looking liquid explosives smuggled into airplane cabins, a majority of Americans still aren't willing to part with their carry-ons.

So says this Newsweek Poll. Fifty-four percent of respondents oppose prohibiting all carry-on baggage "to better prevent terrorists from putting a bomb on a plane," according to the poll, conducted Thursday and Friday nights. Only 26 percent say they "definitely favor" such a move, and 18 percent say they would "probably favor" it.

Hispanic and African-American Adults Are Uninsured at Rates One-and-a Half to Three Times Higher Than White Adults    Tuesday, August 01, 2006
Hispanic and African-American working-age adults in the U.S. are at greater risk of experiencing gaps in insurance coverage, lacking access to health care, and facing medical debt than white working-age adults, according to a new report from The Commonwealth Fund. Sixty-two percent of Hispanic adults ages 19 to 64 - an estimated 15 million adults -were uninsured at some point during the year, a rate more than three times as high as than for white working-age adults (20%). Uninsured rates for working-age African-American adults are also high, with one-third (33%) - more than 6 million adults - uninsured or experiencing a gap in coverage during the year.

To view more click here.

Online Papers Modestly Boost Newspaper Readership    Sunday, July 30, 2006
A decade ago, just one-in-fifty Americans got the news with some regularity from the internet. Today, nearly one-in-three regularly get news online. But the growth of the online news audience has slowed considerably since 2000, particularly among the very young. For the most part, online news has evolved as a supplemental source that is used along with traditional news media outlets. It is valued most for headlines and convenience, not detailed, in-depth reporting.

To view the results from this survey click here.

Most Seniors Enrolled In Medicare Drug Plans Satisfied With Their Plans    Thursday, July 27, 2006
More than eight in 10 seniors who are enrolled in a Medicare drug plan are satisfied with their plan, although almost two in 10 say they encountered a major problem in using it, according to a survey of seniors' experiences under the new Medicare drug benefit.

To view the findings for this poll, conducted by PSRAI for The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, please click here.

Bloggers: A Portrait of the Internet's New Storytellers    Wednesday, July 19, 2006
The ease and appeal of blogging is inspiring a new group of writers and creators to share their voices with the world.

A national phone survey of bloggers finds that most are focused on describing their personal experiences to a relatively small audience of readers and that only a small proportion focus their coverage on politics, media, government, or technology. Blogs, the survey finds, are as individual as the people who keep them. However, most bloggers are primarily interested in creative, personal expression -- documenting individual experiences, sharing practical knowledge, or just keeping in touch with friends and family.

Click here to learn more.

Muslims in Europe: Economic Worries Top Concerns About Religious and Cultural Identity    Thursday, July 06, 2006
Muslims in Europe worry about their future, but their concern is more economic than religious or cultural. And while there are some signs of tension between Europe's majority populations and its Muslim minorities, Muslims there do not generally believe that most Europeans are hostile toward people of their faith. Still, over a third of Muslims in France and one-in-four in Spain say they have had a bad experience as a result of their religion or ethnicity.

To view more, click here.

Democrats More Eager to Vote, But Unhappy with Party    Tuesday, June 27, 2006
With less than five months to go before Election Day, Democrats hold distinct advantages in the midterm campaign that they have not enjoyed for some time. Voters continue to say they favor the Democratic candidate in their district, by a 51% to 39% margin. And the level of enthusiasm about voting among Democrats is unusually high, and is atypically low among Republicans. In fact, Democrats now hold a voter enthusiasm advantage that is the mirror image of the GOP's edge in voter zeal leading up to the 1994 midterm election.

To view the findings click here.

The Great Divide: How Westerners and Muslims View Each Other    Thursday, June 22, 2006
After a year marked by riots over cartoon portrayals of Muhammad, a major terrorist attack in London, and continuing wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, most Muslims and Westerners are convinced that relations between them are generally bad these days. Many in the West see Muslims as fanatical, violent, and as lacking tolerance. Meanwhile, Muslims in the Middle East and Asia generally see Westerners as selfish, immoral and greedy - as well as violent and fanatical. However, both Westerners and Muslims believe that Muslim nations should be more economically prosperous than they are today.

To view more click here.

Iraq Views Improve After Zarqawi's Death    Tuesday, June 20, 2006
A study from the Pew Research Center finds Americans are now more positive about the way things are going in Iraq than in the past few months, following the killing of Abu Musab al-Zarqawi and President Bush's brief visit to the country. Optimism about the U.S. achieving its goals in Iraq, which sagged in the spring, has rebounded. But this has resulted in only a slight boost in the president's overall approval ratings, and last week's congressional debate failed to engage the public or improve the GOP's standing on the issue.

To view the results from this survey click here.

Online Banking 2006: Surfing to the Bank    Wednesday, June 14, 2006
Online banking is holding steady as a mainstream internet activity, growing along with internet use generally, though not accelerating as have some other forms of online activities. Fully 43% of internet users, or about 63 million American adults, bank online.

Click here to learn more.

America's Image Slips, But Allies Share U.S. Concerns Over Iran, Hamas    Tuesday, June 13, 2006
America's global image has again slipped and support for the war on terrorism has declined even among close U.S. allies like Japan. Though a year ago, anti-Americanism had shown some signs of abating, favorable opinions of the United States have fallen in most of the 15 countries surveyed. Yet the survey shows that Americans and the publics of major U.S. allies share common concerns, not only over the possible nuclear threat posed by Iran, but also over the recent victory by the Hamas Party in Palestinian elections.

To view more click here.

Home Broadband Adoption 2006    Sunday, May 28, 2006
Adoption of high-speed internet at home grew twice as fast in the year prior to March 2006 than in the same time frame from 2004 to 2005. Middle-income Americans accounted for much of the increase, along with African Americans and new internet users coming online with broadband at home. At the end of March 2006, 42% of Americans had high-speed at home, up from 30% in March 2005, or a 40% increase. And 48 million Americans -- mostly those with high-speed at home -- have posted content to the internet.

To read the full report, click here.

Grief Issues Still Interfere With the Lives of Many 9/11 Survivors    Friday, May 26, 2006
Nearly five years after the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, a survey of 1,500 adults directly affected by the attacks - including the families who lost loved ones and people who were seriously injured - found that although people are making progress in dealing with the emotional issues related to 9/11, grief is still a factor in their lives. Two-thirds (66%) of the 431 respondents who received mental health treatment said that grief issues still interfere to a large or moderate extent with their lives. Overall, 43 percent of respondents believe that they need additional services of some kind to help them or their families with their continuing recovery.

Study Shows How Kids' Media Use Helps Parents Cope    Wednesday, May 24, 2006
Electronic media is a central focus of many very young children's lives, used by parents to help manage busy schedules, keep the peace, and facilitate family routines such as eating, relaxing, and falling asleep, according to a national study by the Kaiser Family Foundation. Many parents also express satisfaction with the educational benefits of TV and how it can teach positive behaviors. The report, The Media Family: Electronic Media in the Lives of Infants, Toddlers, Preschoolers, and Their Parents, is based on a national survey of 1,051 parents with children age 6 months to 6 years old and a series of focus groups across the country.

To read the full News Release, click here.

Gambling: As the Take Rises, So Does Public Concern    Tuesday, May 23, 2006
A study from the Pew Research Center finds a modest backlash in attitudes toward legalized gambling has taken hold among an American public that spends more money on more forms of legal gambling now than at any time in the nation's history.

To view the results from this survey click here.

How Prepared Are We, New York?    Monday, May 22, 2006
The results of a New York City-wide survey indicates that while most New York residents have taken important preparedness actions, there is still more work to be done. Of the households surveyed, 17-percent report that they are much more prepared than this time last year, 22-percent are somewhat more prepared, and 52-percent are about as well prepared. Only seven percent have become less prepared over the past year. Still, many have not taken tangible steps to prepare for emergencies. A majority claim to have preparedness plans, though nearly seven in ten households with plans report having never tested them. Half of respondents say they have put together emergency supply kits, but most of these kits are incomplete. Fortunately, many would like to become better prepared by receiving more preparedness information and training. The report concludes with recommendations on how to build on existing preparedness efforts, based on NewYorkers' preferred methods of receiving preparedness information and training.

To read the full report, click here.

To read Press Release, click here.

To read Report/Findings cited in the NY Times, click here.

Increasingly, Americans Prefer Watching Movies At Home    Tuesday, May 16, 2006
Three-quarters of all adults say they would prefer watching movies at home rather than in a theater, according to a Pew Research Center survey, up from 67% in 1994. The survey finds that more than seven-in-ten adults (71%) watch at least one movie a week, but the great bulk of this viewing occurs at home rather than in a theater.

Click here to view more results from this survey.

Newsweek Poll: Americans Wary of NSA Spying    Saturday, May 13, 2006
Has the Bush administration gone too far in expanding the powers of the President to fight terrorism? Yes, say a majority of Americans, following this week's revelation that the National Security Agency has been secretly collecting the phone records of U.S. citizens since the September 11 terrorist attacks. According to this Newsweek poll, 53 percent of Americans think the NSA's surveillance program "goes too far in invading people's privacy," while 41 percent see it as a necessary tool to combat terrorism.

National Survey on HIV/AIDS Finds Increased Support for U.S. Leadership to Fight the Epidemic Abroad and at Home    Monday, May 08, 2006
A survey finds that Americans increasingly believe the U.S. should be a global leader on HIV/AIDS, including spending more money to fight the epidemic abroad and at home, despite an American characteristic distaste for foreign aid and a growing budget deficit. Six in ten Americans agree that the U.S. is a global leader and has a responsibility to help fight HIV/AIDS in developing countries -- up from 44% in 2002.

To view results for this poll, conducted by PSRAI for The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, please click here.

Gaps in Health Insurance: An All-American Problem    Wednesday, April 26, 2006
Gaps in health insurance coverage - a problem that has long afflicted lower-income U.S. families - is increasingly becoming an all-American problem. Findings from the Commonwealth Fund Biennial Health Insurance Survey show that, while lack of insurance continues to be highest among families with incomes under $20,000, uninsured rates for moderate- and middle-income earners and their families are rising, putting their health and financial security at risk. The survey finds that most of these individuals reside in working families: Of the estimated 48 million American adults who spent any time uninsured in the past year, 67 percent were in families where at least one person was working full time. In addition, survey respondents were asked about problems with medical bills and accrued medical debt; difficulties in accessing needed health care; problems managing chronic conditions; utilization of routine preventive care, like mammograms and colonoscopies; and coordination and efficiency of care.

To read the full report, click here.

Most Seniors Enrolled in Medicare Drug Plans Are Getting Drugs without Problems    Tuesday, April 25, 2006
A national poll finds that most seniors enrolled in a Medicare drug plan are satisfied with their plan and are not having trouble getting the drugs they need. Most seniors enrolled in plans reported filling at least one prescription, and the vast majority of them -- more than 8 in 10 -- reported no problems getting their prescriptions filled. But still, nearly 2 in 10 did report a problem getting their drugs. Future surveys will probe in greater depth the nature of the problems seniors experience filling their prescriptions.

To view the selected findings for this poll, conducted by PSRAI for The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, please click here.

2006 Governor's Race Up For Grabs; Voters Say Issues Will Be Important    Friday, March 31, 2006
An IssuesPA/Pew poll shows one-third of Pennsylvania voters are not committed to voting for either candidate in the 2006 gubernatorial election. Three-in-ten (29 percent) said they were likely to vote for Governor Ed Rendell, a Democrat, and 35 percent likely to vote for presumptive Republican nominee Lynn Swann. Thirty-four percent of voters are categorized as swing voters who are open to voting for either candidate. According to 43 percent of voters, the candidates' positions on issues will be the key factor in determining who will recieve their vote.

Click here to view more details from the poll, conducted by PSRAI among 1,504 Pennsylvania adults statewide March 14-March 22.

For many home broadband users, the internet is a primary news source    Wednesday, March 22, 2006
By the end of 2005, 50 million Americans got news online on a typical day, a sizable increase since 2002. Much of that growth has been fueled by the rise in home broadband connections over the last four years. For a group of "high-powered" online users - early adopters of home broadband who are the heaviest internet users - the internet is their primary news source on the average day.

To read the full report, click here.

Newsweek Poll: President Bush's Numbers Dropping to New Lows    Saturday, March 18, 2006
George W. Bush's approval rating now stands at 36% in the NEWSWEEK poll, matching the low point is his presidency recorded last November. While President Bush could once count on his image as an effective leader in the war on terrorism to keep his ratings up, that is no longer the case. Today, fewer than half (44%) the public approves of the way he is dealing with terrorism and homeland security. Approval of his handling of the situation in Iraq has also sunk to 29%.

For details, read about this Newsweek Poll conducted by PSRAI. This poll also includes questions on Sigmund Freud's "talking cure", and whether people's dreams reflect their unconscious desires.

To view more, click here.

Newsweek Poll: President Bush's Numbers Dropping to New Lows    Saturday, March 18, 2006
George W. Bush's approval rating now stands at 36% in the NEWSWEEK poll, matching the low point is his presidency recorded last November. While President Bush could once count on his image as an effective leader in the war on terrorism to keep his ratings up, that is no longer the case. Today, fewer than half (44%) the public approves of the way he is dealing with terrorism and homeland security. Approval of his handling of the situation in Iraq has also sunk to 29%.

For details, read about this Newsweek Poll conducted by PSRAI. This poll also includes questions on Sigmund Freud's "talking cure", and whether people's dreams reflect their unconscious desires.

To view more, click here.

Newsweek Poll: Gonzales Has Weak Support    Friday, March 17, 2006
Public opinion is divided on whether Attorney General Alberto Gonzalez should resign after reports of the possible White House involvement in the firings of eight federal prosecutors last year, according to a Newsweek poll. While roughly a third (35%) of Americans want Gonzalez to step down, a similar number want him to stay on (32%), and another third (33%) are undecided. This poll also asked how the issue of marriage and divorce might affect the 2008 presidential race. The poll finds that Americans generally and Evangelical Republicans specifically take a decidedly realistic and nuanced view of marriage and divorce. People are willing to give divorced candidates quite a bit of leeway, but many admit that a candidate's current and past marital relationships do influence their chances of winning their support.

Bush Approval Falls, Congress Gets Praise on Ports Deal    Wednesday, March 15, 2006
In the aftermath of the Dubai ports deal, President Bush's approval rating has hit a new low of 33%, and his image for honesty and effectiveness has been damaged. Yet the public uncharacteristically has good things to say about the role that Congress played in this high-profile Washington controversy.

To view the findings, please click here.

A report in PDF format is also available here.

Bush Approval Falls, Congress Gets Praise on Ports Deal    Wednesday, March 15, 2006
In the aftermath of the Dubai ports deal, President Bush's approval rating has hit a new low of 33%, and his image for honesty and effectiveness has been damaged. Yet the public uncharacteristically has good things to say about the role that Congress played in this high-profile Washington controversy.

To view the findings, please click here.

A report in PDF format is also available here.

Online Dating    Sunday, March 05, 2006
There is now relatively broad public contact with the online dating world. Yet, dating sites are just one of many online avenues that facilitate romantic connections.

To read the full report, click here.

Home Broadband Adoption in Rural America    Sunday, February 26, 2006
Rural Americans are less likely to log on to the internet at home with high-speed internet connections than people living in other parts of the country. By the end of 2005, 24% of adult rural Americans went online at home with high-speed internet connections compared with 39% of adults in urban and suburban areas.

Click here to learn more.

Survey Gauges American's Impression of New Medicare Prescription Drug Benefit    Friday, February 17, 2006
Thirty percent of Americans say they understand the new Medicare prescription drug benefit very well or somewhat well. However, seven in ten (68%) say they do not understand the new benefit. Just 28 percent have a favorable impression of the prescription drug benefit, while 61 percent have either an unfavorable impression or a neutral opinion.

To view the topline results for this poll, conducted by PSRAI for The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, please click here.

Are Parents and Students Ready for More Math and Science?    Wednesday, February 15, 2006
The first of a series of Reality Check reports finds that while parents generally support proposals to make high schools globally competitive, parents start from a different mindset than leaders. In fact, parents' concern about math and science achievement has actually declined since the mid-1990s. Most parents also say the material their children are learning is more challenging than the lessons they had to learn in school.

To read the full report, conducted by PSRAI for Public Agenda, click here.

Most Americans Not Aware of Health Savings Accounts    Wednesday, February 15, 2006
A new national survey looks at what the public has taken away from President Bush's State of the Union address in terms of health care. Forty-one percent of people say they watched or listened to the speech, and almost half say the President's emphasis on health care costs in the health segment of the speech came through to them. But seven in ten (71%) people say they have not heard of the term "health savings account" or don't know what it means, despite news coverage before and after the speech about proposals for expanding their use.

To view the topline results for this poll, conducted by PSRAI for The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, please click here.

Surfing for Fun    Wednesday, February 15, 2006
More Americans are turning to the internet as a place to hang out.

Nearly a third of internet users go online on a typical day for no particular reason, just for fun or to pass the time.

Two-thirds of all internet users have tried surfing the Web just to pass the time, according to a survey we conducted in December 2005. Some 40 million people said they were surfing for fun on a typical day during the month. This number is up from 25 million people who were browsing for no particular reason in November 2004, the most recent time when this question was asked by the Pew Internet Project.

Click here to learn more.

The Strength of Internet Ties    Wednesday, January 25, 2006
The internet helps maintain people's social networks, and connects them to members of their social network when they need help. 60 million Americans have turned to the internet for help with major life decisions.

Click here to learn more.

Generations Online    Sunday, January 22, 2006
Internet users ages 12 to 28 years old have embraced the online applications that enable communicative, creative, and social uses. Older users are more likely to engage in online activities that require some capital: travel reservations and online banking. Tables comparing how different generations' use the internet are included in this data memo.

To read the full report, click here.

Americans Taking Abramoff, Alito and Domestic Spying in Stride    Wednesday, January 11, 2006
Just 18% are paying very close attention to news reports about disgraced Washington lobbyist Jack Abramoff's admission that he bribed members of Congress. As many as 81% of Americans say that lobbyists bribing lawmakers is common behavior in Congress. But the survey finds little political fallout so far from these disclosures.

Click here to view the findings. A report in PDF format is also available here.

Americans Taking Abramoff, Alito and Domestic Spying in Stride    Wednesday, January 11, 2006
Just 18% are paying very close attention to news reports about disgraced Washington lobbyist Jack Abramoff's admission that he bribed members of Congress. As many as 81% of Americans say that lobbyists bribing lawmakers is common behavior in Congress. But the survey finds little political fallout so far from these disclosures.

Click here to view the findings. A report in PDF format is also available here.

Strong Public Support for Right to Die    Thursday, January 05, 2006
A new Pew Research Center poll about end-of-life issues finds overwhelming support (84%) for laws giving patients the right to decide whether they want to be kept alive through medical treatment. And by a 70% to 22% margin, the public says there are circumstances when patients should be allowed to die rather than doing everything medically possible to save a patient.

To view the findings, please click here. A report in PDF format is also available here.

Strong Public Support for Right to Die    Thursday, January 05, 2006
A new Pew Research Center poll about end-of-life issues finds overwhelming support (84%) for laws giving patients the right to decide whether they want to be kept alive through medical treatment. And by a 70% to 22% margin, the public says there are circumstances when patients should be allowed to die rather than doing everything medically possible to save a patient.

To view the findings, please click here. A report in PDF format is also available here.

How Women and Men Use the Internet    Wednesday, December 28, 2005
Women are catching up to men in most measures of online life. Men like the internet for the experiences it offers, while women like it for the human connections it promotes.

To read the full report, click here.

How Women and Men Use the Internet    Wednesday, December 28, 2005
Women are catching up to men in most measures of online life. Men like the internet for the experiences it offers, while women like it for the human connections it promotes.

To read the full report, click here.

Baby Boomers Approach 60    Thursday, December 08, 2005
As the oldest of the nation's 75 million baby boomers approach the age of 60, a major new Pew Research Center survey finds many are looking ahead to their own retirement while balancing a full plate of family responsibilities - either raising minor children or providing financial or other forms of support to adult children or aging parents. Detailed information, including the full report "From the Age of Aquarius to the Age of Responsibility" is available here.

Baby Boomers Approach 60    Thursday, December 08, 2005
As the oldest of the nation's 75 million baby boomers approach the age of 60, a major new Pew Research Center survey finds many are looking ahead to their own retirement while balancing a full plate of family responsibilities - either raising minor children or providing financial or other forms of support to adult children or aging parents. Detailed information, including the full report "From the Age of Aquarius to the Age of Responsibility" is available here.

Pennsylvanians Less Pleased with Direction of State, Property Taxes    Thursday, December 08, 2005
The 2005 IssuesPA/Pew benchmark poll shows a continuing downward trend in Pennsylvanians' satisfaction with the direction of their state over the past year. Only 44% of those surveyed describe themselves as satisfied, compared to 50% a year ago. Citizens' declining faith in the state's leadership and uneasiness with taxes highlighted concerns, although other economic insecurity issues such as their ability to afford health care, finance retirement and pay energy costs were also mentioned.

To read about this poll, conducted by PSRAI, click here.

Massachusetts Baby Boomers Redefining Retirement    Friday, December 02, 2005
Baby boomers in Massachusetts are planning to delay retirement and continue working even after they retire, according to a new poll conducted by PSRAI for MassINC, an independent, non-partisan organization working to improve life in Massachusetts. The survey explored issues surrounding a generation in transition, including their expectations for work, retirement, housing, family responsibilities, personal health, and civic life. The survey is based on 1,000 interviews with Massachusetts adults ages 40 to 58, conducted between June 23-July 23, 2005.

To view the report, please click here.

To view the survey results, please click here.

Massachusetts Baby Boomers Redefining Retirement    Friday, December 02, 2005
Baby boomers in Massachusetts are planning to delay retirement and continue working even after they retire, according to a new poll conducted by PSRAI for MassINC, an independent, non-partisan organization working to improve life in Massachusetts. The survey explored issues surrounding a generation in transition, including their expectations for work, retirement, housing, family responsibilities, personal health, and civic life. The survey is based on 1,000 interviews with Massachusetts adults ages 40 to 58, conducted between June 23-July 23, 2005.

To view the report, please click here.

To view the survey results, please click here.

Americans Concerned About HIV/AIDS Despite Progress    Tuesday, November 29, 2005
Four in ten Americans feel the U.S. is making progress in dealing with the problem of HIV/AIDS today, while one quarter say the problem is about the same as it has been in the past. However, another quarter feel the country is losing ground in this area.

To view the topline results for this poll, conducted by PSRAI for The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, please click here.

About 25 million people have used the internet to sell something    Sunday, November 27, 2005
Some 17% of online American adults have used the internet to sell things. That amounts to approximately 25 million Americans. In addition, internet traffic data show that visits to classified ad web sites has grown 80% in the past year. Almost everything imaginable is currently for sale or has been for sale by individuals on various auction or classified ad sites. Tangible items like pink plastic Christmas trees, collectible coins, wedding dresses, automobiles, books, or CDs share web space with a myriad of intangibles including virtual weaponry and characters from online games (sold for real money) and services including everything from finding a French tutor, a personal trainer or someone to clean your aquarium. Demographically, online sellers have an "early adopter" profile and they are relatively intense users of the internet.

To read the full report, click here.

13 million Americans made donations online after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita    Thursday, November 24, 2005
In the aftermath of the Gulf Coast Hurricanes, 13 million Americans made donations to relief efforts online and 7 million set up their own hurricane relief efforts using the internet. In addition to using the internet to respond directly to the crisis, 50% of online users sought out news and information online.

To read the full report, click here.

Foreign Policy Views of Opinion Leaders and Public Turn Cautious    Monday, November 21, 2005
A quadrennial poll on foreign policy issues finds both the public and U.S. opinion leaders taking a decidedly cautious view of America's place in the world, reflecting concerns about the war abroad and growing problems at home. The survey, a collaborative effort between the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press and the Council on Foreign Relations, finds a revival of isolationist sentiment among the general public, and a decline in support from opinion leaders for the United States playing a "first among equals" role among the world's leading nations.

The findings of the America's Place in the World 2005 Survey are based on interviews conducted between September 5-October 31, 2005. To read more about it, click here.

Foreign Policy Views of Opinion Leaders and Public Turn Cautious    Monday, November 21, 2005
A quadrennial poll on foreign policy issues finds both the public and U.S. opinion leaders taking a decidedly cautious view of America's place in the world, reflecting concerns about the war abroad and growing problems at home. The survey, a collaborative effort between the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press and the Council on Foreign Relations, finds a revival of isolationist sentiment among the general public, and a decline in support from opinion leaders for the United States playing a "first among equals" role among the world's leading nations.

The findings of the America's Place in the World 2005 Survey are based on interviews conducted between September 5-October 31, 2005. To read more about it, click here.

Search engine use shoots up in the past year and edges towards email as the primary internet application    Sunday, November 20, 2005
Washington -- Search engines have become an increasingly important part of the online experience of American internet users. These findings from Pew Internet & American Life tracking surveys and consumer behavior trends from the comScore Media Metrix consumer panel show that about 60 million American adults are using search engines on a typical day.

To read the full report, click here.

Search engine use shoots up in the past year and edges towards email as the primary internet application    Sunday, November 20, 2005
Washington -- Search engines have become an increasingly important part of the online experience of American internet users. These findings from Pew Internet & American Life tracking surveys and consumer behavior trends from the comScore Media Metrix consumer panel show that about 60 million American adults are using search engines on a typical day.

To read the full report, click here.

Storms Had Little Impact on Readiness, Study Finds    Friday, November 18, 2005
Most Americans are no better prepared for a disaster than they were before hurricanes Katrina and Rita struck the Gulf Coast and are generally unaware of local response plans for disasters, according to a study by New York University.

Most Americans No Better Prepared For Disasters After Katrina, Poll Shows    Thursday, November 17, 2005
A majority of Americans say they are no better prepared for a disaster than they were before Hurricane Katrina and have less confidence in their government to protect them. Yet most people will keep relying on state and local officials in the immediate aftermath of a terrorist attack or natural disaster, according to two polls and an accompanying analysis by New York University's Center for Catastrophe Preparedness and Response. The research was obtained Thursday by The Associated Press...

Newsweek Poll: Serious Trouble for President Bush    Monday, November 14, 2005
George W. Bush's approval rating has fallen to 36 percent in the aftermath of the Scooter Libby indictment and the withdrawal of the Harriet Miers Supreme Court nomination. Two-thirds (68%) of Americans are unhappy with the direction of the country - the highest level of public dissatisfaction seen in a decade. Just a year after winning re-election, President Bush is now regarded as "honest and ethical" by less than half of the public (42%).

For details, read about the Newsweek Poll conducted by PSRAI.

Teen Content Creators and Consumers    Wednesday, November 02, 2005
American teenagers today are utilizing the interactive capabilities of the internet as they create and share their own media creations. Fully half of all teens and 57% of teens who use the internet could be considered Content Creators. They have created a blog or webpage, posted original artwork, photography, stories or videos online or remixed online content into their own new creations.

To read the full report, click here.

Leap of Faith: Using the Internet Despite the Dangers    Wednesday, October 26, 2005
Web users are demanding more of Web sites while becoming less trustful of them. They are adjusting their behavior in response to what they see as real threats online. In fact, almost a third say they are cutting back their Web use, according to a survey of Internet users by Consumer Reports WebWatch.

For the full report, click here.

Public Sours on Government AND Business    Tuesday, October 25, 2005
The public's ratings of the federal government and Congress have dropped sharply in the past year. But public discontent with the state of the nation is not reserved for Washington institutions alone. Favorable opinions of business corporations are at their lowest point in two decades, according to a national survey by the Pew Research Center for the People and the Press.

For more details, click here.

How to Bridge America's Economic Divides Post-Katrina    Tuesday, October 18, 2005
The survey indicates that even after Katrina, Americans across income levels share many of the same hopes and aspirations for the future. However, most Americans agree that the gap between the rich and poor is very big. The majority of respondents supported a broad range of measures to help with poverty, such as increased wages, health insurance, education, job training and tax credits. Among the top reasons cited for poverty are low minimum wage, benefit cuts, too many part-time jobs and jobs being exported to other countries.

Pennsylvanians Losing Confidence in State Government    Thursday, October 13, 2005
After voting themselves a pay raise this past summer, Pennsylvania state legislators are viewed less favorably by state residents. At least for now, Governor Ed Rendell has managed to avoid the pay raise fallout.

To read more about this IssuesPA/Pew Poll conducted by PSRAI, click here.

Newsweek Poll: Bush Approval Slide Stopped    Monday, October 03, 2005
George W. Bush's approval rating is up a few points from the record low recorded in early September, despite the indictment of House Speaker Tom Delay. Americans believe the President has done a better job responding to Hurricane Rita and her aftermath than he after Katrina.

For details, read about this in a Newsweek Poll conducted by PSRAI.

Newsweek Poll: President's Image Also Suffers Hurricane Damage    Monday, September 12, 2005
George W. Bush's popularity and approval ratings have dropped across the board in Katrina's wake, according to a Newsweek Poll conducted by PSRAI.

Two-In-Three Critical Of Bush's Hurricane Relief Work    Thursday, September 08, 2005
The American public is highly critical of President Bush's handling of Hurricane Katrina relief efforts. And there is a huge racial divide over Katrina and its consequences, according to a national survey by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press.

To read the full report, click here.

Religion: A Strength And Weakness For Both Parties     Tuesday, August 30, 2005
Both major political parties have a problem with their approach toward religion, in the eyes of many Americans, according to a national survey by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press and Pew Forum on Religion & Public Life.

To learn more, click here

Teens Leading Transition to Mobile Nation    Wednesday, July 27, 2005
Today, American teens live in a world enveloped by communications technologies; the internet and cell phones have become a central force that fuels the rhythm of daily life, according to a Pew Internet and American Life survey.

Click here for more details.

Public Confident, Lawyers Not, that President Bush will Make Good Choice in Supreme Court Nomination     Tuesday, July 19, 2005
Nearly six in ten of Americans say that they are confident the President will make good choices in his nominations to replace Supreme Court justices, while six in ten lawyers do not have faith in Bush's ability to choose the best candidate for lifetime appointment in the highest court.

To read the release, click here.

Islamic Extremism: Common Concern for Muslims    Thursday, July 14, 2005
Concerns over Islamic extremism, extensive in the West even before this month's terrorist attacks in London, are shared to a considerable degree by the publics in several predominantly Muslim nations surveyed by the Pew Global Attitudes Project.

Click here to learn more.

Islamic Extremism: Common Concern for Muslims    Thursday, July 14, 2005
Concerns over Islamic extremism, extensive in the West even before this month's terrorist attacks in London, are shared to a considerable degree by the publics in several predominantly Muslim nations surveyed by the Pew Global Attitudes Project.

Click here to learn more.

Women and Health Care: A National Profile    Thursday, July 07, 2005
A new national survey of women on their health by the Kaiser Family Foundation finds that a substantial percentage of women cannot afford to go to the doctor or get prescriptions filled. Although a majority of women are in good health and satisfied with their health care, many have health problems and do not get adequate levels of preventive care, according to the survey conducted by PSRAI.

For a detailed report, click here.

Spyware is changing the internet    Wednesday, July 06, 2005
Spyware and the threat of unwanted programs being secretly loaded onto computers are becoming serious threats online, according to a Pew Internet and American Life survey.

To find out more, click here.

U.S. Image Up Slightly, But Still Negative    Thursday, June 23, 2005
Anti-Americanism in Europe, the Middle East and Asia, which surged as a result of the U.S. war in Iraq, shows modest signs of abating. But the United States remains broadly disliked in most countries surveyed, and the opinion of the American people is not as positive as it once was, according to a 16-nation Pew Global Attitudes survey.

To view the detailed findings, click here.

Baby Boomers Want to Work and Help in Retirement    Thursday, June 16, 2005
A recent PSRAI poll for Civic Ventures finds that leading-edge Baby Boomers as well as Americans age 60 to 70 are ready now, and in retirement, to shift to jobs that give back to their communities

Click here to check out the New Face of Work.

One American in Four Considers Rush Limbaugh a Journalist    Monday, June 13, 2005
About as many Americans consider Rush Limbaugh, the conservative radio talk show star, to be a journalist as say the same of Bob Woodward, the Washington Post assistant managing editor who broke the Watergate story with Carl Bernstein, according to a national survey conducted for the University of Pennsylvania Annenberg Public Policy Center.

For the full press release, click here.

Party Identification and Election 2004    Monday, May 16, 2005
2005 AAPOR Conference Paper

2004 Presidential Approval Ratings in Perspective    Saturday, May 15, 2004
2004 AAPOR Conference Paper


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